Rice & Beans and thangs! - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rice and beans tsitenha Food and water 57 02-19-2015 02:11 PM
Rice and beans, beans woozy Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 29 11-07-2012 11:21 PM
rice and beans, beans and rice Mad Pole Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 66 08-05-2012 10:01 AM
How to season Rice & Beans Antiacus Recipes 24 08-31-2011 11:40 AM
Sams out of rice and beans RockinGLock Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 21 08-03-2010 02:06 PM
Dry beans and rice,Question TXak Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 10 11-22-2009 09:38 PM
Rice and beans shawn Recipes 13 08-03-2009 07:24 PM
Beans and Rice ClovisMan Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 34 12-20-2008 07:49 PM
beans and rice riverrat Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 9 02-04-2008 05:06 PM
Beans and Rice bluefool Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 14 01-14-2008 11:34 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-04-2010, 12:08 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 64,003
Thanks: 129,603
Thanked 153,049 Times in 44,570 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default



Advertise Here

Gridrebel makes a good point. I haven't tinkered a whole lot with ground beans, but I've played around a little bit. Navy beans and Great Northerns ground into flour make a "gravy" like consistency and flavor with very little cooking. Many years back I ate a cake that was made from ground pinto beans. You couldn't tell they were in there and the cake was one of the moistest cakes I've ever tasted.

Ground beans cook very quickly, which saves fuel. Even coursely cracking beans speeds the cooking process immensely, and for those that don't like the texture of whole beans, this might be a solution. It's a good way to sneak beans into all sorts of other recipes too.

Ground rice has a lot of uses also. Finely milled becomes rice flour, with a bunch of uses. The Asian cultures have a bunch of useful recipes for it. A little less finely ground and you can substitute it for corn meal 1 to 1 in any recipe calling for it. I've used it to replace some of the corn meal in cornbread just to see what happens and it was good. Rice flour gives a crispness that can't be duplicated. Mix some in cookie recipes, or in with your flour for dredging.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 07-04-2010, 12:11 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 64,003
Thanks: 129,603
Thanked 153,049 Times in 44,570 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Pete View Post
Sprouting beans will make some of those dried meals fresh. all you need is a mason jar the outer rim and cheese cloth. Wet and drain daily and keep in a cool dark place. You will have something fresh from dried beans in a couple of days. It goes well with rice and cooked dried beans.
Sprouting improves the nutrient content also, especially boosting vitamin C, which will be in short supply for those who aren't gardening. Sprouted beans still need cooking though, as there is something in them that blocks the absorbtion of nutrients. Some, like kidney beans, are really bad about that, while others like mung beans aren't. I wish I had a chart or something that I could post but I've never found one.
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-04-2010, 09:16 PM
OhioMan's Avatar
OhioMan OhioMan is offline
It's ok to be white
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 32,618
Thanks: 92,600
Thanked 92,802 Times in 24,446 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
Gridrebel makes a good point. I haven't tinkered a whole lot with ground beans, but I've played around a little bit. Navy beans and Great Northerns ground into flour make a "gravy" like consistency and flavor with very little cooking. Many years back I ate a cake that was made from ground pinto beans. You couldn't tell they were in there and the cake was one of the moistest cakes I've ever tasted.
Ground beans cook very quickly, which saves fuel. Even coursely cracking beans speeds the cooking process immensely, and for those that don't like the texture of whole beans, this might be a solution. It's a good way to sneak beans into all sorts of other recipes too.

Ground rice has a lot of uses also. Finely milled becomes rice flour, with a bunch of uses. The Asian cultures have a bunch of useful recipes for it. A little less finely ground and you can substitute it for corn meal 1 to 1 in any recipe calling for it. I've used it to replace some of the corn meal in cornbread just to see what happens and it was good. Rice flour gives a crispness that can't be duplicated. Mix some in cookie recipes, or in with your flour for dredging.


I didn't know you could make a flour with great northern beans

That's good to know
Thanks Teacher!
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to OhioMan For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-05-2010, 05:33 AM
Silentpoet Silentpoet is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 531
Thanks: 528
Thanked 406 Times in 195 Posts
Default

Don't add peanut butter to rice. I tried it once, it didn't work. I do like honey over rice for a breakfast type treat/meal. Rice is real good with chili over it. Also try canned chicken and sauce. You can also make a great dish with rice, taco meat, and cheese.
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2010, 08:06 AM
Zombie Hunt Club's Avatar
Zombie Hunt Club Zombie Hunt Club is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: The Volunteer State
Posts: 2,053
Thanks: 172
Thanked 1,521 Times in 761 Posts
Default

i plan on using some of my Honeyville dehydrated veggies to help with both. Beans and rice will keep me alive but variety is the spice of life. Heck even if it is wild greens, anything will be better. I have a few stored spices but spices typically dont store very well - salt being one of the exceptions. Growing a little something of your own - Im on an 1/8th of an acre in a big suburban neighborhood and still i grow stuff - will help as well. You arent going to be overly healthy on just those staples. Your gastric happiness level will be low! A dash of dehydrated vegetables whether adding corn to your beans or some carrot pieces or celery in your rice will make the difference between just living and thriving. I havent mentioned the additional of wild meats or even poultry of some kind that you may have post SHTF. Those are obviously HUGE pluses.
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2010, 04:10 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 64,003
Thanks: 129,603
Thanked 153,049 Times in 44,570 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombie Hunt Club View Post
I have a few stored spices but spices typically dont store very well
I get years out of my stored spices. They lose some strength over time, but you can compensate for that by adjusting the amount added. Luckily, most are easy to grow and dry and don't need much space though.

Variety is indeed the spice of life and extremely important for a number of reasons. Appetite fatigue being one of them. But we need more foods than just beans and grains to remain healthy. Sprouting is a good way to get fresh veggies into the diet, as well as live enzymes. I store a lot of dehydrated veggies too.

Basically, I take a look at the foods I enjoy now, and stock the items to prepare them later. Lots of pastas, ethnic dishes of all sorts, etc.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 07-05-2010, 10:48 PM
Summer's Avatar
Summer Summer is offline
Still here...
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: AZ
Posts: 1,153
Thanks: 3,681
Thanked 1,474 Times in 650 Posts
Default

Cooked rice and a can of cream of mushroom is really good. Do you have condensed soup in your stores?

I'm not great with beans. Others have already covered everything I've tried and them some.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Summer For This Useful Post:
Old 07-07-2010, 11:36 AM
Diddy's Avatar
Diddy Diddy is offline
Proverbs 26:4
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: FEMA region V
Posts: 2,112
Thanks: 4,377
Thanked 2,201 Times in 957 Posts
Default

I just had a very good rice dish last week. It isn't something that I thought I would like but...

It was white and saffron rice with sweet/tart berries and almonds. It is a mediterranean dish and very refreshing departure from the rice dishes I'm used to eating.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Diddy For This Useful Post:
Old 07-07-2010, 12:04 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 64,003
Thanks: 129,603
Thanked 153,049 Times in 44,570 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diddy View Post
I just had a very good rice dish last week. It isn't something that I thought I would like but...

It was white and saffron rice with sweet/tart berries and almonds. It is a mediterranean dish and very refreshing departure from the rice dishes I'm used to eating.
Rice is one of the most versatile grains there is. I rarely have plain white rice unless it's a side dish to an asian meal. I usually make some form of pilaf.

Also, you can make a really rich and delicious rice dish by using canned coconut milk. You can replace some of all of the water with the milk. If you want it really rich and caloric, add the coconut cream too. I usually skim it and use it in cooking the rest of the meal. The coconut rice gets some golden raisins and a pinch of curry powder tossed in.

I've also used rice as a base for a quick meal when I'm in a hurry. I measure out the rice and liquid first, then toss in some veggies and meat and put it in a rice cooker. It's almost like stew, only dry. Very fast one dish meal.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 07-07-2010, 12:35 PM
SmokeEater2's Avatar
SmokeEater2 SmokeEater2 is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 402
Thanks: 239
Thanked 423 Times in 188 Posts
Default

Beans and rice are staples for us,both for storage and everyday use. Rice can be added to meatloaf to stretch the servings,to stew,soups etc. Sweetened and eaten as a breakfast or dessert.

Beans can be added to almost any dish also. Chili made with beans and served over rice makes a filling meal and is fairly inexpensive. I bet I ate a ton of that particular dish in Army chow halls and field kitchens over the years.
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-07-2010, 02:00 PM
Bullets~n~Beans Bullets~n~Beans is offline
Just livin'
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Off-grid in the Idaho backcountry
Age: 59
Posts: 2,466
Thanks: 6,571
Thanked 3,789 Times in 1,491 Posts
Default

So many good idea's on this thread that I'm thinking of a cut and paste to a word doc and printing it out.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Bullets~n~Beans For This Useful Post:
Old 07-07-2010, 08:19 PM
Diddy's Avatar
Diddy Diddy is offline
Proverbs 26:4
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: FEMA region V
Posts: 2,112
Thanks: 4,377
Thanked 2,201 Times in 957 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
Rice is one of the most versatile grains there is. I rarely have plain white rice unless it's a side dish to an asian meal. I usually make some form of pilaf.

Also, you can make a really rich and delicious rice dish by using canned coconut milk. You can replace some of all of the water with the milk. If you want it really rich and caloric, add the coconut cream too. I usually skim it and use it in cooking the rest of the meal. The coconut rice gets some golden raisins and a pinch of curry powder tossed in.

I've also used rice as a base for a quick meal when I'm in a hurry. I measure out the rice and liquid first, then toss in some veggies and meat and put it in a rice cooker. It's almost like stew, only dry. Very fast one dish meal.
Mike, I've also had a curry and raisin rice dish and I liked it too, surprisingly. I love curry but I'm not one to mix sweet and spice. I generally don't like sweet meals. I'm a salty, crunchy kind of guy. But you're right, rice is a very versatile food. I guess that's why it's been around for thousands of years
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-07-2010, 09:17 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 64,003
Thanks: 129,603
Thanked 153,049 Times in 44,570 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diddy View Post
Mike, I've also had a curry and raisin rice dish and I liked it too, surprisingly. I love curry but I'm not one to mix sweet and spice. I generally don't like sweet meals. I'm a salty, crunchy kind of guy. But you're right, rice is a very versatile food. I guess that's why it's been around for thousands of years
I'm not normally one to like anything sweet unless it's a desert dish. I don't want sweet cornbread, BBQ sauce or anything else. But it just sorta makes culinary "sense" in some curries, and it works really well with the coconut milk in the rice, though I don't sweeten the rice at all.
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-08-2010, 11:41 AM
I Buried My Guns's Avatar
I Buried My Guns I Buried My Guns is offline
I'll bring the rope.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston: we have a problem
Posts: 1,354
Thanks: 9,441
Thanked 2,427 Times in 836 Posts
Default You: Wise beyond your years

Quote:
Originally Posted by jane333 View Post
I personally think the key to great beans is GREASE. Doesn't matter what kind, just plenty of it. We use bacon drippings.....

Bacon grease may be the most underrated cooking ingredient known to all mankind, except muslims, who will never know of its' true awesomeness. I try to stockpile it whenever I use bacon in a recipe, and some oldtimers have told me it does not go rancid if stored correctly. I am dubious of that, but I love bacon grease a lot. It adds a smoky component to dishes even when you don't want to add any actual bacon; it injects an element of complexity.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to I Buried My Guns For This Useful Post:
Old 07-08-2010, 11:44 AM
I Buried My Guns's Avatar
I Buried My Guns I Buried My Guns is offline
I'll bring the rope.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston: we have a problem
Posts: 1,354
Thanks: 9,441
Thanked 2,427 Times in 836 Posts
Default American Tastes: insipid and simple?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diddy View Post
...I love curry but I'm not one to mix sweet and spice....
I heard this from many, many folks. They just don't cotton to it. There is something about the American palette that resists the sweet/spicy combo. I am included in that.

So no curry ice cream for me or you!
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-08-2010, 12:04 PM
SmokeEater2's Avatar
SmokeEater2 SmokeEater2 is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 402
Thanks: 239
Thanked 423 Times in 188 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by I Buried My Guns View Post
Bacon grease may be the most underrated cooking ingredient known to all mankind, except muslims, who will never know of its' true awesomeness. I try to stockpile it whenever I use bacon in a recipe, and some oldtimers have told me it does not go rancid if stored correctly. I am dubious of that, but I love bacon grease a lot. It adds a smoky component to dishes even when you don't want to add any actual bacon; it injects an element of complexity.

Yup! Good ol' bacon grease can make a lot of things taste better whether it's a pot of beans or plain ol' macaroni, bacon grease adds a lot of flavor.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to SmokeEater2 For This Useful Post:
Old 07-08-2010, 12:32 PM
OhioMan's Avatar
OhioMan OhioMan is offline
It's ok to be white
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 32,618
Thanks: 92,600
Thanked 92,802 Times in 24,446 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullets~n~Beans View Post
So many good idea's on this thread that I'm thinking of a cut and paste to a word doc and printing it out.
thinking the same thing, rice and bean are the one thing I have 100's of pounds of and I want as many ideas as I can.
Quick reply to this message
Old 07-08-2010, 12:50 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 64,003
Thanks: 129,603
Thanked 153,049 Times in 44,570 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioMan View Post
thinking the same thing, rice and bean are the one thing I have 100's of pounds of and I want as many ideas as I can.
One cookbook I can highly recommend is "366 Delicious Ways to cook Rice, Beans and Grains" by Andrea Chesman. It gives a fascinating variety of combinations and easy recipes. They're not as good as the ethnic recipes you'll find by browsing the cuisines of different cultures. But it's sure a great starting point for developing your own.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 07-08-2010, 01:16 PM
OhioMan's Avatar
OhioMan OhioMan is offline
It's ok to be white
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 32,618
Thanks: 92,600
Thanked 92,802 Times in 24,446 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
One cookbook I can highly recommend is "366 Delicious Ways to cook Rice, Beans and Grains" by Andrea Chesman. It gives a fascinating variety of combinations and easy recipes. They're not as good as the ethnic recipes you'll find by browsing the cuisines of different cultures. But it's sure a great starting point for developing your own.
thanks Mike, I'm going to Barns and Noble this weekend, I'll see if they have it. That's a good idea!!!
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to OhioMan For This Useful Post:
Old 07-08-2010, 01:58 PM
I Buried My Guns's Avatar
I Buried My Guns I Buried My Guns is offline
I'll bring the rope.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston: we have a problem
Posts: 1,354
Thanks: 9,441
Thanked 2,427 Times in 836 Posts
Default I don't mean this in a creepy way!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeEater2 View Post
Yup! Good ol' bacon grease can make a lot of things taste better whether it's a pot of beans or plain ol' macaroni, bacon grease adds a lot of flavor.
When I taste the awesomeness of bacon grease in a dish, I feel loved, like my departed mom is hugging me from heaven. It's that good.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
beans, black beans, dried beans, lima beans, red beans, stockpiling food, storing beans, storing food, storing rice, storing rice and beans, white rice



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net