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Old 10-24-2019, 11:49 PM
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Default Lentils vs. beans



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The common wisdom of LTS food is that beans need to be a staple due to their long shelf life (5+ years), and high amounts of protein and carbohydrates. Unfortunately, they require a lot of time to soak, and often a long time to cook. That means time and fuel spent cooking instead of anything else that would need to be done in a situation requiring you to live off of your stockpile.

Lentils on the other hand have similar amounts of protein and carbs, higher fiber, and a few micronutrients most beans lack. AND they can be cooked in 15 minutes, although they're still better if you presoak them IMHO. The only downside I can see is that the only shelf life information I can find is around 3 years. Which is still perfectly fine for 99.9999% of the people who maintain and rotate a stockpile.

Are there any other positives or negatives of lentils over beans? I haven't seen them promoted much as a LTS food option.
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Old 10-25-2019, 12:11 AM
prairiegirl1925 prairiegirl1925 is offline
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I haven't seen anything about their shelf life. They are legumes, as are beans. They are also called pulses. I have some lentils because of the low cooking time. Black beans also do not take as long to cook, but probably more time than lentils.

There are a variety of lentils. There is a brown variety that is sold in most grocery stores in America. There is a red split lentil that is used to make a variety of Indian dal. It too does not take long to cook. If you can find Indian grocery stores, you will see that there are a variety of legumes that are used for making dal. Make some dal, basmati rice and some Indian flat bread from your wheat and you will have an inexpensive food storage meal, with a little variety from other beans.
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Old 10-25-2019, 01:07 AM
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For the most part, lentils have a healthful nutritional profile, but those who have kidney issues or are prone to calcium-oxalate kidney stones may want to limit lentils in the diet.

https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/len...eys-12272.html

Although I enjoy lentils on a regular basis, I would not want to create any kidney issues by going crazy overboard with this legume.
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:28 AM
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Didn't know about the kidney stone issue. I'll have to cut back. I like 'em, and the easy cooking is a plus, but I don't want a repeat of last year's stone!
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Old 10-25-2019, 04:35 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
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I eat them occasionally. I just like pintos, black and navy beans as well as most peas better.
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Old 10-25-2019, 07:08 AM
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I store both, small white beans and lentils.
We also stock chickpeas/garbanzo beans.
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Old 10-25-2019, 07:15 AM
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I like and eat a lot of pulses
Mostly black beans and lentils
I have both on hand
Very healthy foods
For me it is not a one or the other deal
Long term, dry beans will become so hard as to be inedible
I do not see a huge advantage here, either way
I believe in not having specialized survival food so
First in and first out will prevent dried-out beans
Soaking beans overnight reduces cooking length
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Old 10-25-2019, 08:29 AM
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I grew up eating pintos and red bean besides the various ones dad grew in the garden more often than lentils.

Wife grew up eating lentils more often than beans.

We’ve moved towards the middle on this to where I tend to cook lentils when cooking over a fire just because they cook so fast.

Throw in some onions, potatoes and carrots and I have a soup I can feed us with in 20 minutes or so.

Nothing wrong with quick and easy!

SD
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Old 10-25-2019, 08:42 AM
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Add some salt pork or bacon to that! MMMmmmm!
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Old 10-25-2019, 08:43 AM
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I have eaten lentils stored in a jar, more than 3 years old, they were fine. They are the only bean I prep.

I can't think WHY I would want to spend 6x as long cooking another bean.

I have plenty of spices for variety.
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Old 10-25-2019, 09:02 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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I store and cook them all, but white navy pea beans are my favorite.

For pintos, I store them uncooked for about 3 yrs and then pressure can them for up to 5 more years (my neighbors usually have them gifted to them, and love them!). Navy beans don't make the 3 year uncooked mark cause I love to eat them.

WW

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Old 10-25-2019, 09:41 AM
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Lucky for us there isn't a bean or pea we don't like and we prep a little bit of all of them.
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Old 10-25-2019, 10:13 AM
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Flavor, texture and cost.

Two of my kids are picky eaters, we have beans as part of our meals 3-5 times a week, they will eat bowls and bowls of pintos, navy and great northern beans. They will only eat a spoon full of black beans, kidney beans, split peas, black eyed peas, chick peas, or any type of lentils. I also favor pintos and navy beans over the rest.

We buy pintos, navy and split peas at a semi-local restaurant supply store for $.30-$.50 a pound. I think lentils locally are about $1.50 a pound(they were out of stock at the restaurant supply store so this isn't necessarily a fair price comparison)

With storing pintos I am aware of the risk of them becoming unable to soften when cooked if stored too long. We probably go through 80+ pounds of them a year so I figure it is safe to store a few hundred pounds of them without too much risk of them going bade before we rotate through them.

Cooking time is much longer for pintos. For us that makes them much more of a winter food where the excess heat is welcome. In a SHTF event I have a wood stove for heat, A cooking pot can be put on top of it and used like a slow cooker running all the time. For use in the summer we over night soak 5 pounds of beans then pressure can them into 7 one quart jars. That way when we want to make a meal the beans just need to warm up and it uses very little fuel and doesn't make a hot kitchen hotter by requiring long cook time.

You can also look into hay box cooking to save fuel, I found pinto beans need to be boiled 2 times in the process to get soft enough, then finished on the stove to get the right doneness I like.
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Old 10-25-2019, 10:23 AM
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When the pintos get too hard, I guess you can grind them up? Can you reasonably do it in a Corona hand grinder? What's the best way to grind, wet or dry and what do you do with the grinded up beans?
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Old 10-25-2019, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puttster View Post
When the pintos get too hard, I guess you can grind them up? Can you reasonably do it in a Corona hand grinder? What's the best way to grind, wet or dry and what do you do with the grinded up beans?
I am not even sure what "hard" means when it comes to old beans. Does it mean "al dente" hard once cooked? Or "rocks that will break teeth" hard once cooked?

If it is al dente hard, I would assume they could be soaked and cooked then ran through a meat grinder to make something like chunky refried beans. I can't imagine grinding dry beans in a wheat grinder would be easy on the person or the grinder.
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Old 10-25-2019, 12:04 PM
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Pressure cooker will soften them, I'd bet. Like others have posted, no bean lasts long enough around here to get that hard. I also stock brown rice over white, for a dietary reason, and it doesn't last long enough to go bad, either.
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Old 10-25-2019, 12:32 PM
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You can pressure can them, or cook them and dehydrate them, store in mylar with O/2 absorbers and avoid the too hard to eat dilemma altogether. Yes over time they will get too hard to pressure cook and soften, avoid it or lose 'em . I'm not sure grinding them is possible or even if it is would it be beneficial?
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceoky View Post
You can pressure can them, or cook them and dehydrate them, store in mylar with O/2 absorbers and avoid the too hard to eat dilemma altogether. Yes over time they will get too hard to pressure cook and soften, avoid it or lose 'em . I'm not sure grinding them is possible or even if it is would it be beneficial?
Are you talking about beans, lentils, or both?
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:27 PM
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I'm not saying that beans don't have a place, I'm just surprised at the lack of attention regarding lentils. The main advantage to me is the short cook time, but I didn't know about them causing kidney stones in some people. I've been eating them pretty heavily recently, so I doubt I'll have an issue but it's good to know.

Lentils are definitely going to simplify and lighten my camping/woods BOB supplies, whereas beans take too much time and fuel to be an option for me.
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Old 10-25-2019, 03:09 PM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaSierraCharlie View Post
...Lentils are definitely going to simplify and lighten my camping/woods BOB supplies, whereas beans take too much time and fuel to be an option for me.
Lentils certainly play a part in that kind of scenario and I do keep a few of them around. I'm a bug-in guy and my group will most likely have a fire going most hours of the day. Having one of the kids tending a pot of beans over a slow fire will probably occur frequently.
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