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Old 04-14-2019, 06:55 PM
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For myself, my land is zoned as residential and so is unlikely to be on anyone's watch list. Many people living in residences do plant a few fruit trees in my area. I just happen to have a lot more than most other people. My efforts have been towards getting fruit trees and also chestnuts planted first. Blight resistant chestnuts I found grow real well in my climate. I can likely figure out a way to store chestnuts long term. Beside nuts, citrus while not for storing, can stay on the tree through most of the winter here, especially grape fruit like citrus. I just planted some medlars which are a late fall or early winter fruit and need to bleated rather than eaten when mature. Peanuts do well here and hope yams and sweet potatoes will also. I just put in the last of my paw paws today. For spring it is berries, mulberries, and loquats. Then the early nectarines and chickasaw plums, by then early apples and pears about 1st of july are getting ready. The asian pears are the last of the pears. Then come the persimmons for fall.
later this summer I will start preparing land for gardens and finally storing a year's supply of food for me and my dogs.
The fruit tree cultivars tend to mature at different times of the season and there will be no one time that every tree has fruit on it. It is more like picking throughout the year. That is not the sort of crop that will attract governmental attention, but could attract some trailer trash that according to roads are 3 miles away, but across a large swampy creak wet lands about 0.5 miles away.
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Old 04-15-2019, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Hilltopper View Post
Yesterday I was talking to someone whom has "farm status" and pays lower property tax but thinks she is opting out of the new mandatory registration of private wells used for farm purposes, these will be taxed here in our part of Canada. I think she is delusional now she has projected herself as a farm benefiting from that status and having a farm stand, accepting government money to employ student helpers and using woofers . Her well is now open to scrutiny and taxation , not a big step further to taxing her property for not producing to capacity for the public or government benefit or being assigned under other management if food production became critical . Our country imports 10.5 billion dollars in fruit and vegetables a year now and is welcoming more refugees , setting up social nets for all those downtrodden . If something goes off the deep end like Venezuela, accepting government funds may be akin to them taking over management of her property .
Exact-a-mundo. I think CA. wants rural folks to register their wells. All for the good of course.

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Originally Posted by sonya1 View Post
We could survive on our farm if the grid went down, but we would not be able to defend it against a hostile government. Nothing we can do about that. But, I think if it came to that I would burn it all to the ground and kill as many of them as I could before they kill us. Scary thoughts, but realistic.

Venezuela can't be that bad yet, there are no massive deaths due to starvation, crime, lack of medical care or the blackout. At least you don't hear about it. I do wonder what its really like there. People on here have this idea that if the grid went down millions of people would just die. This isn't what's happening in Venezuela. Humans are sort of like cockroaches. It takes a lot to decimate the population.
You make several good points. People are getting by, but that's about it.
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Old 04-15-2019, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
My efforts have been towards getting fruit trees and also chestnuts planted first. Blight resistant chestnuts I found grow real well in my climate. I can likely figure out a way to store chestnuts long term.
Have you considered truffles?

Apparently there's already a naturally growing native pecan truffle in south ga and presumably in your area as well.

https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/food-...VlGwbWk62qg7O/
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:54 AM
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Have you considered truffles?

Apparently there's already a naturally growing native pecan truffle in south ga and presumably in your area as well.

https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/food-...VlGwbWk62qg7O/
I will look into it. Sounds fascinating.
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:40 AM
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...I can likely figure out a way to store chestnuts long term. ...
From here: https://www.lost-in-france.com/blog/...autumns-bounty
"You can easily preserve chestnuts through the winter, after removing them from their green prickly husks make sure they are perfectly dry then place them in a wooden box or barrel between layers of dry fine sand much like the method used to preserve carrots."

...and a couple of intriguing recipes here, especially the one with whiskey : https://www.italymagazine.com/commun...ving-chestnuts

"Castagne Sotto Whisky
Ingredients: 1 kg Chestnuts, 1 litre whisky, 500g sugar
Method: Peel chestnuts Choose the largest and best looking chestnuts and keep them as whole as possible. Place the whisky in a saucepan and stir in the sugar. Bring the mixture to the boil. Add the chestnuts and turn off the heat. Leave to cool and bottle into clean jars."

"Marmellata di Fagioli e Castagne
This is a kind of substitute for the ubiquitous Nutella, just better and less sickly sweet.
Ingredients: 400g dried white beans, 150g sugar, 400g chestnuts
Method: Soak the beans overnight in plenty of water. Drain and boil in fresh water until soft, then whiz them to a fine puree in a food processor. In the meantime peel the chestnuts and chop them finely. Put the bean puree back into the saucepan and, over a low flame stirring constantly, add the sugar. Once the sugar is dissolved, add the chopped chestnuts, taking the mixture off the heat. Bottle immediately into hot jars, seal and turn upside down for about half an hour. Use as a sandwich spread."
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Old 04-18-2019, 08:54 AM
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Once the sugar is dissolved, add the chopped chestnuts, taking the mixture off the heat. Bottle immediately into hot jars, seal and turn upside down for about half an hour. Use as a sandwich spread.
Chestnut butter wow. at this link is some information on chestnuts relative to diet. https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/ben...nuts-2283.html They are low in fats and are high in complex carbohydrates. At one time in many parts of the eastern USA they were an important food item prior to the chestnut blight. I have 3 blight resistant dunstan chestnuts that are now mature enough to bear nuts and have planted diverse chinese chestnut seedlings around my place. Right now I am waiting for tassels to appear on my trees. They were until recently badly shaded. I removed some of the shade this year and during the summer I will take down some more of the shading oaks with hopes of a better nut crop.
I also have some chinquapin x chinese chestnut hybrids.
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Old 04-18-2019, 10:28 AM
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“Man does not live by chestnut alone”..... ha!
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