Survivalist Forum

Survivalist Forum (https://www.survivalistboards.com/index.php)
-   Disaster Preparedness General Discussion (https://www.survivalistboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=49)
-   -   Where do I get live chickens? (https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=27691)

Jevaud 10-06-2008 09:29 PM

Where do I get live chickens?
 
Some friends of mine and I are planning on raising egg-laying hens in our back yard. Does anybody have any hints or help on what I would need and how much it would cost?

Also, I live in Florida in Lee County, does anyone know where in my area I can get some live hens and how much it would cost?

Thanks to anyone that can help.

thx1138 10-06-2008 09:43 PM

Try calling your county extension office, they may be able to guide you in the right direction plus give you some tips about raising poultry in the area.

RevPaul 10-06-2008 09:47 PM

Go too the feed store there, ask for peeps, or go too the flea market off MLK blvd, check there, they may have some.
Cost?
What the market will bear.
Look for rhode island reds.
Also, you can check off hwy 31, only a few hundred farms there, the farmers will sell you some, just knock on a door, and ask.

Reality Czech 10-06-2008 09:47 PM

Look in the yellow pages under Feed & Seed stores.
My local Purina dealer carries chicks year round.
They run under $2 apiece.
They just need a coup to roost in at night, that's safe from predators.

Scruggs 10-06-2008 09:58 PM

There are mail order hatcheries that will ship chicks directly to you. I have used:
www.hoffmanhatchery.com but they are on the expensive side if you go that route.

Try putting a want add in the local paper that you would like to purchase a few hens. I have sold quite a few to local folks who wanted just a couple of hens and had run an add in the local "Pennysaver" type paper looking for them. Sometimes you can get them really cheap or even free from someone who has become tired of the beasts. I have also seen chicks for sale at a local tractor supply and a feed store. It isn't hard to raise them but you need to get ready for them before you buy them.

Jevaud 10-06-2008 10:13 PM

Awesome thank you very very much. I am feeling much more optimistic about having hens now. Does anybody know how much feed usually costs for them. I'm planning on having like two or three.

Reality Czech 10-06-2008 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jevaud (Post 293156)
Awesome thank you very very much. I am feeling much more optimistic about having hens now. Does anybody know how much feed usually costs for them. I'm planning on having like two or three.

A 50 lb bag of high quality layer formula feed runs around $13, with supplimental other foods such as kitchen scraps, cracked corn, that bag should last at least 3 months or more. If they can free range even longer.
Chickens will eat whatever you eat,.....mine are especially fond of chicken and dressing leftovers.:D:

Sam Reeves 10-06-2008 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jevaud (Post 293156)
Awesome thank you very very much. I am feeling much more optimistic about having hens now. Does anybody know how much feed usually costs for them. I'm planning on having like two or three.

Start out with a bag of starter feed and they'll be healthier sooner.

Mama Bear 10-06-2008 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reality Czech (Post 293170)
A 50 lb bag of high quality layer formula feed runs around $13, with supplimental other foods such as kitchen scraps, cracked corn, that bag should last at least 3 months or more. If they can free range even longer.
Chickens will eat whatever you eat,.....mine are especially fond of chicken and dressing leftovers.:D:

.... You feed your chickens other chickens? Isn't that how mad cow disease got started? :eek: *mental image of zombie chicken outbreak* LOL :upsidedown:

RevPaul 10-06-2008 10:30 PM

Buy 15 peeps, 1 rooster, and you should end up with 10-12 laying hens.
Buy less, and you may not have any.
When they stop laying eggs, you have stew chickens.
Note:
Most chickens are hybreds, and will not reproduce viable survivable chickens for long term.
They also (Includes all chickens) will not lay eegs when molting.
Buy a book at the feed store, it will help.

Scruggs 10-06-2008 10:43 PM

Yeah, a bag of feed will last you a long time. The prices quoted by others is also the price around here. We usually sell mature hens for around $5 each. I forgot to mention that about 1/4 of the people who bought a few chickens from me showed up a few days later wanting me to take them back. They bought them without having a coup, waterers, feeder or anything else ready for them. They got them home and put them in the garage or cellar. A few days of them crapping in those areas was enough to change their minds. You are putting some thought into this so you won't have that problem. Medicated feed for a few weeks then go to layer feed. With just a couple of chickens, a 50 pound bag of medicated crumbles may be too much.

Belladonna 10-07-2008 03:12 AM

Craigslist is also a good place to look. I live in Florida (duval county) and that's where I got mine.

I keep two little buckets in my kitchen, one is for the compost pile and the other is scraps for the chickens. I give them feed as everyone else mentioned and a hand full of oyster shells from time to time.

LuniticFringeInc 10-07-2008 03:52 AM

In my area the Feed Stores usually sell Cornish Rock Cross (big meat chicken) and Plymouth Barred Rock pullets (good egg laying hens) in the spring time. The rest of the year I have to oder them from a hatchery. I believe McMurry is who I have used the last few times I have bought chickens. The down side is the hatcherys usually sell them in lots of 25 chicks.

As for food. With chicks I would start off with the medicated crumbles as much as I hate that. The chicks do really well on it and put on some size quick. After they get some size you can use scratch which is really cheap and not all that great, but if supplemented with some scraps and free ranged is okay. With just scratch you wont see fast gains in weight or spectacular egg production, but it works. For egg laying chickens if you want good egg production there is a layer feed available but it cost more than the "Scratch" does.

I do about 4 batches of 25 Cornish Rocks a year and try to keep a good dozen or so laying hens on hand along with a seperately penned Rooster or two. The Cornish Rocks go in the freezer and any culls from the rest of the flock make soup or dumplings. It works out pretty good this way for me. The biggest issue I have had is keeping them safe from preaditors. A good strong chicken pen and roost go a long way to that end despite the number of preaditors in the area that will often attempt to get to them.

headhunter74 10-07-2008 06:11 AM

chickins in the mail
 
look at mcmurrayhatchery.com.... they have some intersting combos.... dont have to get all of the same kind....:thumb:

Ihatebugs 10-07-2008 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jevaud (Post 293079)
Does anybody have any hints or help on what I would need

The first thing you need is to go to the library and get a book about raising chickens.

Don't make the same mistake I made the first time around. Start small... I'd say about 3 chickens at the most. Use them as a learning experience, and then you can decide if you want more chickens later.

If you crowd too many chickens in a small area, they will kill each other.

wildjo 10-07-2008 07:22 AM

The problem with the mail order hatcheries is they require a minimum order of 25. One place I've found that will ship you less is mypetchicken.com. I've tried craigslist, but haven't had any luck, they are always gone or the person never returns the call/email.

The feed store is where we got our first batch, but they only sell in the late spring.

You can get an incubator and fertile eggs on ebay. If you purchase a heirloom breed, you should have no problem with healthy chicks despite the warning above about hybrids.

Chickens are great. They eat lots of bugs, produce great compostable matter for the garden, and are, generally, well behaved. Ours return to the coop like clockwork every evening and all we have to do is shut the door.

Crutch 10-07-2008 09:38 AM

I have many chickens, and I used eggbid.com

I also have a friend who only sells organic animals. They are feed only natural food, with out additives or hybrid plants. They generally cost a few dollars more, but if your wanting to start out and you plan on eating the eggs, its something to consider. He is the only recognized true organic commercial farmer in NC.

http://www.naturallygrown.org/ The qualifications are extremely hard to meet. But if you ever visit his farm, you can tell the difference.

http://www.classifiedflyerads.com/profile/12313/

I would suggest going through Mike, because he is a fellow survivalist. He also was the guy who offered to let us meet on his land a few months back.

I really never cared about organics until what I ate started to effect my health. All the garbage we pump into ourselves is why we are ballooning up. Not that I am a health nut, (wish that I was) I just think organics are better. Sure the fattened calf isn't 4 tons of fat and steriods, but it wont cause your 9 year old daughter to grow double d breasts and cancer by 20.

Mike holland is a former Marine and a close friend as I said. He has a ton of info on his blog. Things like "how to tell if the egg is freash" or "how to raise your chickens organically". Check it out.

http://www.kerrlake.org/news.php

Crutch 10-07-2008 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ihatebugs (Post 293413)
The first thing you need is to go to the library and get a book about raising chickens.

Don't make the same mistake I made the first time around. Start small... I'd say about 3 chickens at the most. Use them as a learning experience, and then you can decide if you want more chickens later.

If you crowd too many chickens in a small area, they will kill each other.

I disagree. They pretty much take care of themselves if they are free ranged. That meens, they wonder around your yard freely. I usually leave my roosters out to be freeranged. They don't wonder far, because the females are locked up.

Chickens eat table scraps and grass. They also eat bugs and pretty much anything. I have been raising chickens for about 4 or 5 years now. They are easy to take care of, and don't require a great deal of attention.

Personally I would buy about 5, free range the roosters, and enjoy the eggs.

Jevaud 10-07-2008 02:55 PM

I will have to individually thank everyone here. I am very exited about the idea of raising my own chickens. My next necessity are plans for a back yard coop. Would anyone have any ideas as far as size for like 2-3 hens?

Ihatebugs 10-07-2008 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CrutchCoR (Post 293553)
I disagree. They pretty much take care of themselves if they are free ranged. That meens, they wonder around your yard freely. I usually leave my roosters out to be freeranged. They don't wonder far, because the females are locked up.

Chickens eat table scraps and grass. They also eat bugs and pretty much anything. I have been raising chickens for about 4 or 5 years now. They are easy to take care of, and don't require a great deal of attention.

Personally I would buy about 5, free range the roosters, and enjoy the eggs.

You're making it sound more simplistic than it really is for a beginner. This guy doesn't even know where to get chickens, so that's a sure sign he doesn't know anything about chickens.

Before you buy any chicks, you need to buy or build a coop and nesting boxes. And it has to be built right, or else predators will get in and eat your chickens. If you want eggs in the winter, you need to provide a heat source or the hens will stop laying.

And the chicks themselves need special care. You need a heat lamp, and set it at the appropriate distance so the chicks don't get too hot.

Like I said, go to the library and get a book about chickens.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,