Survivalist Forum

Survivalist Forum (https://www.survivalistboards.com/index.php)
-   Farming, Gardening & Homesteading (https://www.survivalistboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=13)
-   -   Could You Garden Successfully in Venezuela's Grid Down / Collapse Conditions? (https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=915542)

Velvet Elvis 04-10-2019 06:09 AM

Could You Garden Successfully in Venezuela's Grid Down / Collapse Conditions?
 
1 Attachment(s)
That really cuts to the heart of EP gardening in my opinion. They are not in a true EMP type grid down, but given their circumstances they are essentially living much that way. Must be horrible. It could last for years.

That's why I survival garden for the most part like I'm in a grid down existence.

I address that in this latest post to my blog

https://growingfromscratch.com/2019/...la-nightmares/


"Can you imagine living in Venezuela right now?

More importantly….. have you ever imagined living like that? Have you ever seriously stopped to think about the ramifications of an economic collapse? Your money is virtually worthless. Wide ranging power blackouts, almost no food, eating pets and whatever stray animals can be obtained. They are essentially in a grid down existence, the very type of which I write about here. Recent online articles featured dramatic headlines such as “Venezuelans Return To Middle ages”. I’ve always viewed the scenario of a power grid catastrophe as returning us to the 1800’s rather than a time of peasantry. Give or take a few hundred years, the dire meaning is the same.

For their city dwellers, it must be a living hell. But I wonder how the rural folk are doing? Not the bigger farm operations. They are surely suffering. But what of the common ......"


Blackout in Caracas ... the real deal. The garden center is closed.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/at...1&d=1554894437

FarmerChad 04-10-2019 06:30 AM

If there was ever a "**** has hit the fan situation", I'm pretty confident this is it. I don't know if any of us have been alive to see something similar.

Your observations are spot on. Like you, gotta wonder about the rural folk. I think though, they farmed/farm without machinery? I think I recall reading about that. Something about after the gov takeover, diesel became so expensive, they just went back to doing everything by hand?

barnetmill 04-10-2019 06:59 AM

Of course people garden there but a lot less in the cities compared to rural. Without modern machinery food production would be lower. Venezuela has oil fields and no diesel, strange. Likely lacking transportation to bring produce in to the cities.

Likely they have disarmed the farmers so anyone can take what someone else grows which can lead to other problems. Under such circumstances the armed police and military do not often go hungry. All of the above could possibly happen in the USA in the future. I certainly hope not.

Don H 04-10-2019 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barnetmill (Post 19461732)
Likely they have disarmed the farmers so anyone can take what someone else grows which can lead to other problems. Under such circumstances the armed police and military do not often go hungry. All of the above could possibly happen in the USA in the future. I certainly hope not.

It has happened in the past, during the Great Depression and will likely happen again.
I was talking with my Dad the other day about living during the depression. He told about how he and his brothers (born 1928 - 32) would each get an empty sack and get dropped off after dark by their father at a nearby farm. The kids were expected to come back with a full sack of whatever was growing in the fields, usually corn and tomatoes.

Major Mjolnir 04-10-2019 07:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barnetmill (Post 19461732)
Of course people garden there but a lot less in the cities compared to rural. Without modern machinery food production would be lower. Venezuela has oil fields and no diesel, strange. Likely lacking transportation to bring produce in to the cities.

Likely they have disarmed the farmers so anyone can take what someone else grows which can lead to other problems. Under such circumstances the armed police and military do not often go hungry. All of the above could possibly happen in the USA in the future. I certainly hope not.

Disarmament started with Chavez in 2012 and was stiffened to 20 in years in prison for 'illegal' carrying or selling under Maduro. Some firearms were surrendered voluntarily but most were confiscated.

barnetmill 04-10-2019 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don H (Post 19461784)
It has happened in the past, during the Great Depression and will likely happen again.
I was talking with my Dad the other day about living during the depression. He told about how he and his brothers (born 1928 - 32) would each get an empty sack and get dropped off after dark by their father at a nearby farm. The kids were expected to come back with a full sack of whatever was growing in the fields, usually corn and tomatoes.

Here is a longstanding rural practice
https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/rCcAA...RX/s-l1600.jpg

https://www.google.com/search?q=wate...i3xGIM:http://

The Old Coach 04-10-2019 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don H (Post 19461784)
It has happened in the past, during the Great Depression and will likely happen again.
I was talking with my Dad the other day about living during the depression. He told about how he and his brothers (born 1928 - 32) would each get an empty sack and get dropped off after dark by their father at a nearby farm. The kids were expected to come back with a full sack of whatever was growing in the fields, usually corn and tomatoes.

I read a story a while ago about an urban-gardening program in some eastern city. It was abandoned after the produce was all stolen as soon as it was ripe.

It's more than an urban legend that Depression-era truck farmers used to keep an old shotgun loaded with rock salt handy.

Velvet Elvis 04-10-2019 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FarmerChad (Post 19461700)
If there was ever a "**** has hit the fan situation", I'm pretty confident this is it. I don't know if any of us have been alive to see something similar.

Your observations are spot on. Like you, gotta wonder about the rural folk. I think though, they farmed/farm without machinery? I think I recall reading about that. Something about after the gov takeover, diesel became so expensive, they just went back to doing everything by hand?

The focus of the blog is more in regards to the gardening aspects rather than the farming. I wonder where these folks are getting seeds for example. Was their soil managed to not require amendments purchased from the store etc. No doubt the machinery / diesel dependent growers are already irrelevant.

Velvet Elvis 04-10-2019 10:14 AM

Looting of the farms is another matter. The article was written with our Venezuelan counterparts in mind, the backyard gardeners.

barnetmill 04-10-2019 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis (Post 19461978)
The focus of the blog is more in regards to the gardening aspects rather than the farming. I wonder where these folks are getting seeds for example. Was their soil managed to not require amendments purchased from the store etc. No doubt the machinery / diesel dependent growers are already irrelevant.

It is a rural tropical country area that we are talking about. People have had gardens there for millennia. People under such conditions usually manage to find a way. Some tropical crops are grown from cuttings. There are many fruit trees. there is often the emergence of black market and bartering that occurs when there are shortages due to break down of normal commerce.
Elvis you are asking very specific questions from us that mostly live in the USA so we can not answer from direct knowledge and must speculate.

bunkerbuster 04-10-2019 11:04 AM

The trouble in Venezuela is generally only the bad guys have firearms & ammo.

Consequently, if the bad guys see fruits / vegetables / crops growing somewhere, once ripe they steal it at gunpoint.

So, many who could grow a garden don’t, simply because they cannot defend what they could produce.

The meager exception is rural or isolated areas where there aren’t many bad guys.

Velvet Elvis 04-10-2019 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barnetmill (Post 19462034)
Elvis you are asking very specific questions from us that mostly live in the USA so we can not answer from direct knowledge and must speculate.

I can see I may need to edit the thread title. The “conditions” referred to is not the growing climate/ geographic region, but financial collapse, the inability to depend on store bought goods to aid in growing. That’s what the article is about.

barnetmill 04-10-2019 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis (Post 19462128)
I can see I may need to edit the thread title. The “conditions” referred to is not the growing climate/ geographic region, but financial collapse, the inability to depend on store bought goods to aid in growing. That’s was the article is about.

I see what you are asking and one does need to phrase questions carefully at times. But you are still making a assumptions. you are assuming Venezuela that gardening are highly dependent on such store bought items. Just how dependent were our ancestors during the depression on store bought items. You are really asking if we suffered a complete financial breakdown like Venezuela could we still have some decent gardens?
i am working to get myself to that point.
More important to have some big food storage also and hope things sort themselves out before you have to depend solely on gardening. I am going to look into myself getting patches of things to grow in the same patch year to year. I need to look into peanuts, sweet potatoes, yams, several other root crops and perennials that will come up each year for
crops to see if they maintain themselves in the same place year to year. Seed saving is important also.
A just as likely SHTF would be some environmentally based disaster causing crop failure of one of the major grain crops of the world.

FarmerChad 04-10-2019 02:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Velvet Elvis (Post 19461978)
The focus of the blog is more in regards to the gardening aspects rather than the farming. I wonder where these folks are getting seeds for example. Was their soil managed to not require amendments purchased from the store etc. No doubt the machinery / diesel dependent growers are already irrelevant.

Your absolutely right, I was a bit off target. That happens. :)

See below for my thoughts on seed and supplies.

Quote:

Originally Posted by barnetmill (Post 19462178)
I see what you are asking and one does need to phrase questions carefully at times. But you are still making a assumptions. you are assuming Venezuela that gardening are highly dependent on such store bought items. Just how dependent were our ancestors during the depression on store bought items. You are really asking if we suffered a complete financial breakdown like Venezuela could we still have some decent gardens?
i am working to get myself to that point.
More important to have some big food storage also and hope things sort themselves out before you have to depend solely on gardening. I am going to look into myself getting patches of things to grow in the same patch year to year. I need to look into peanuts, sweet potatoes, yams, several other root crops and perennials that will come up each year for
crops to see if they maintain themselves in the same place year to year. Seed saving is important also.
A just as likely SHTF would be some environmentally based disaster causing crop failure of one of the major grain crops of the world.

But, keep in mind their current situation has only been going on for what, about 5 years? it was a slow decline into their current reality. I'm guessing most folk, just like in the USA, simply went to the stores and bought what they need. They had no concerns about the "old ways". They had money, no worries at all.

I'm willing to bet the knowledge of an old timer is priceless, about now.

That might be a good question,better asked in the thread about V. Coming apart. Assuming that thread is still active? Haven't checked it out for a long time.

ajole 04-10-2019 05:00 PM

Once upon a time in the Amazon, they simply burned off a few acres, farmed it for 4-6 years until it was exhausted by leaching and production, then moved over to the next patch of rain forest, burned it off, and farmed there for 4-6 years....rinse, repeat.

Parts of Venezuela will still be able to do that. If anyone knows what to grow and how to grow it. Chances are good, there are some that do, in those areas.

But closer to towns? Not so much. They have decades of land issues, with the gov't taking land, giving land, people leaving cities to settle on free land, but then being unable to grow things without gov't help...they've been a net importer of food for years.

The knowledge won't be there, even if the tools and materials were, and I doubt the things that WILL easily grow there, are the things they want to grow.

old_code 04-10-2019 05:03 PM

If water is a limited resource, it's going to be challenging. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-v...-idUSKBN1QS2SN

Considering Southern California's reliance on distant water supplies, if we didn't have water out of the taps, we'd be in deep doo-doo, too. We'd have to raid swimming pools to flush toilets (not joking; did that after the Northridge earthquake.)

Velvet Elvis 04-11-2019 05:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barnetmill (Post 19462178)
But you are still making a assumptions. you are assuming Venezuela that gardening are highly dependent on such store bought items. Just how dependent were our ancestors during the depression on store bought items. You are really asking if we suffered a complete financial breakdown like Venezuela could

Correct, I do assume that much of the Venezuelan growing is largely dependent on the stores. Maybe less so than Americans though, but still not prepared to deal with a large scale crisis.

The overall premise of my article is probably best summed up in this snippet.

"I realize that makes me sound like a grumpy old Luddite. Its a stance I take only because I believe we imperil ourselves by losing sight of what we are supposedly engaged in. Prepper gardening is survival gardening. That means mastering the skills needed to grow food without the crutches of industry. The best simulation in my opinion is the pretense of an attack on the power grid. A nation at a standstill. Gardening would instantly be forced to revert back to the old ways."

Velvet Elvis 04-11-2019 06:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FarmerChad (Post 19462532)

I'm willing to bet the knowledge of an old timer is priceless, about now.

Absolutely! The old timer knowledge is golden.

mtnairkin 04-11-2019 07:23 AM

Right now I grow lots of food but I do use modern methods (powered machinery) to grow it.

I also practice to a small extent doing without machinery. In a situation comparable to Venezuela's I could grow enough food for myself to live on (and have the seeds and tools to do it). It would not be easy. Even more difficult as one ages. If other people were involved, it would require more food but there would be more help and load sharing to grow it.

Because I have enough space in a state of cultivation that it would not take pioneering efforts to work the land, it would be much much easier than starting from scratch (my original efforts were much more akin to pioneering than farming/gardening). I also have been accumulating equipment that could be drawn by animals but as yet am not equipped to utilize it because I have no draft animals. :)

The great unknown is always people and politics. Will it be possible to get into the gardens to work them and would you be able to keep the produce for your own purposes and the people that produce it.

At some point the situation can breakdown, like it apparently has in Venezuela, and become difficult to the point of impossible to grow and protect your food or even barter it. This is all pure speculation and then one uses the judgement on what Bunker mentioned on our current right to keep and bear arms (and how long that will last). It boils down to that even if growing food is reasonably doable, will one be able to utilize the fruits of one's labor?

The next question would be, do you have the skills and the area to utilize what nature offers.

Velvet Elvis 04-11-2019 08:08 AM

All good points. A fair amount of speculation comes with all scenarios. Being able to keep / guard your own produce partially depends on the severity of calamity. As we have a strong gun culture I believe the ability to defend it would be somewhat possible in the country, at least initially. Urban plots wouldn’t stand a chance however. Even with a martial law situation, small country gardens would be high on the tree rather than low hanging fruit.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:56 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,