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-   -   Weedinhoe's 2016-2020 Garden (https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=428297)

FarmerChad 04-30-2016 05:43 AM

You just now got the A/C going? I must be going soft. Mine has been running for a few weeks now. :D:

My house is brick so it seems to just radiate heat if the sun is shining.

Weedinhoe 04-30-2016 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FarmerChad (Post 9702305)
You just now got the A/C going? I must be going soft. Mine has been running for a few weeks now. :D:

My house is brick so it seems to just radiate heat if the sun is shining.

Two strategically placed floor fans and open windows had been doing the trick... until yesterday! Last night after it cooled off I opened up the house again and turned on the fan. That sweet scent of blooming chinaberry trees just drifted right in. Love it!

LindaLou 04-30-2016 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Weedinhoe (Post 9699361)
It was a real stinker today, hitting 91 this afternoon
This afternoon around 4:30 was the first use of the sprinkler in the garden for the summer and I got the lower half of the garden watered for about an hour on each side. Everything is so dry.

Wish I could deport some of our flooding rain to your area where it would do some good. :D:

Weedinhoe 05-01-2016 04:17 PM

Yesterday I had to hand water the upper half of the garden. It was just too windy to use the sprinkler and the wind kept shifting to boot. But hand watering also has the advantage of getting 'up close and personal' with stuff so I noticed that there seem to be some leaf miner activity happening on some of the quinoa leaves. I've not seen much of that before.

The first cluster of four cherry tomatoes were ready on that one plant I kept going through the winter so I picked them. Lots of greenies behind those:

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=53753

And this morning I picked the first 'SugarSprint' sugar snap peas. Boy, are they sweet!

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=53761

inMichigan 05-01-2016 09:09 PM

Seeing your pictures gives us heart on our more dreary days of what is to come.

FarmerChad 05-02-2016 07:26 AM

Is that a "Felt Gro-Bag" I see that cherry tomato plant in?

Weedinhoe 05-03-2016 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FarmerChad (Post 9725465)
Is that a "Felt Gro-Bag" I see that cherry tomato plant in?

That's just a ten gallon nursery bucket. Gee, I wonder how they got here... :D:

Weedinhoe 05-03-2016 10:43 AM

Dry, dry dry. We've only had .68" of rain in the last thirty days and I've had to resort to this. Putting the sprinkler on the ladder gives the water more range.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=54001

UNTIL YESTERDAY!!!!! We got 2.5" between 3pm yesterday and this morning. Woo hoo! Such a welcome site I thought I'd take a pic of it to remind me in the next dry spell that miracles do happen and prayers do get answered... eventually. :thumb: Those are two kinds of arugula (a summer type and a more cold hardy winter type) going to seed which will be collected. The winter has already formed seed pods and the summer is still blooming.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=54009

Weedinhoe 05-05-2016 01:35 PM

Yesterday I got three more beds mulched with last fall's oak leaves. It was a really nice 75 out there but the wind was blowing hard so it was a good thing the leaves were wet from the recent rain and stayed where I put them.

The bed on the left has 'Duke' bush beans. The trellis on the end has only three of the 'Purple Violetto' pole beans as germination was poor. The next bed to the right has both 'Charleston Wakefield' and 'Stonehead' cabbages on one side and 'Packman' broccoli on the other. I've kept the deer netting on that bed and it's been fun watching very frustrated cabbage moths desperately trying to reach the plants. So it's not just deer that the netting is keeping away!

The next bed to the right has seven hills of 'Double Yield' cucumbers that just poked up several days ago.

The last bed to the right has four 'Siberian Dwarf' kale, three 'Alabama Red, collards, three 'Flash' collards and two Chinese cabbages in half of the bed. Again, netting on those plants. The other half of the bed is now empty after the spinach and radishes went away yesterday and I'm going to put some basil, dill and cosmos plants in there.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=54233

Weedinhoe 05-06-2016 04:00 PM

This afternoon found me providing extra support for the 'Wando' peas. The peas were originally planted to an 18" high fence and last year they got tall but didn't need extra support. This year they've gone bonkers. The high winds of the last two days started pushing them over so I had to rig higher support to prevent bent stems.

I pounded in taller stakes and then ran a line down both sides of the two beds using catfish trot line. I guess you'd call it braided nylon; strong stuff and it doesn't stretch like jute twine.

So the problem is fixed. The first picking is about two or three days away.

The bed next to the peas has 'Bountiful' bush beans down the left side and 'Golden Rod' wax bush beans on the right side along with that 'Alabama Blue' collard that's going to seed.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=54385

LindaLou 05-07-2016 04:04 PM

Beautiful, absolutely beautiful !

Question: Do you prefer Wando or is there anyother pea that produces well in heat?

Weedinhoe 05-07-2016 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LindaLou (Post 9798561)
Beautiful, absolutely beautiful !

Question: Do you prefer Wando or is there anyother pea that produces well in heat?

Thank you for the kind words! Peas... over many years I've tried a ton of kinds of peas and once I found 'Wando' I've never looked back. LOL! Oh, I keep trying other peas now and then to grow alongside the 'Wando' cuz ya just never know when there's something even better out there but 'Wando' beats them all for me. It takes the cold and really takes the heat. That's important here as it can start getting hot early.

Now, I tried a bed of 'Sabre' last year and they did really well. A bit longer pea than 'Wando' and they bore well. So I did them again this year but had a really bad germination problem with them. Yes, it was last year's seed but all the other pea seed I sowed this spring did fine, even the two year old 'Wando' I found at the bottom of the seed can. Out of a whole bed I was able to get just 25 little pea plants to come up. They got transplanted elsewhere to free up that bed.

I'll give them one more chance next spring as I always like to have two kinds of varieties going just in case something happens to one of them.

Weedinhoe 05-08-2016 02:35 PM

Water conservation. Every place has dry spells to contend with. However it sometimes seems that there's a dome over this location that diverts rain around us. There's got to be some geographical aspect that splits approaching storms to either side of us, raining a mile away and leaving us high and dry. That can sometimes be a blessing though when it's rough weather that's coming.

Many years ago my 80 year old garden mentor (I'll call her Mrs. N) taught me to plant things in a "bowl". She'd use a clawed hand, beginning in the middle of where the plant or seeds would go. Then she'd make her hand go around and around in the soil in ever increasing circles until she had created a bowl in the soil. She said that when you watered by hand, the bowl would keep the water from running off and keep it right where the water was needed. I've been following the practice ever since and it has really helped, especially during those times when you wonder if the water will hold up in the well.

Today I mulched one of the cucumber beds but before I did I broke up the crust on the surface and then hoed up more soil around the edges of the bowls. Because I had the time, I went one step farther than I ever have and used the back of the hoe to kind of tamp the sides of the bowl to reinforce them, hopefully to prevent "blowouts" when water is added to the bowls.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=54473

I've thought about using irrigation hose and soaker hose. Due to the number of raised beds there are and the changing plant spacing every year, irrigation line with emitters is a no-go. Also, the length of the beds vs the length that soaker hose comes in doesn't work and it's too pricey to buy that much. So I use "bowls'' and mulch and it works well. It's free and the leaves add to the soil. No hose or lines to store over the winter.

Here's the finished bed. The sticks in the bowls are there to show me where the bowls are once the bed is covered in cuke vines so that I put the water in the right place. There are seven bowls of cukes so it's gonna get crowded in there! But a gentle redirection of wandering vines kind of keeps them from overtaking the walkways. This particular bed is planted with 'Homemade Pickles', a prolific cuke for me with somewhat shorter vines which helps.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=54465

If anyone has other water saving tips to share, I'd love to hear them!

LindaLou 05-08-2016 08:22 PM

I read a few suggestions some years ago in Mother Earth and I've used them; they work pretty well.

1.) The bowl like you use.
2.) Buried soaker hose. I have a much smaller space for garden so I just lay out my soaker hose where I need it, then use a small hoe next to the hose to dig a tiny trench just big enough to bury the hose. Pretty good for irrigation of a small garden.
3.) Dig a retention pond next to each large plant, i.e. tomato, eggplant, cuke, etc. The pond I manage to dig is maybe 18 inches across and 6 inches deep. The idea is to catch rain in a pond that will slowly leach water to the surrounding soil where the plant has roots. I fill mine with pine cones in an attempt to slow evaporation, kinda like Los Angeles did with the thousands of plastic balls in their city reservoir. Can't hurt, might help!
Anyway, besides mulch, these are my good old standbys for getting by with erratic rainfall.
Hope it helps. :thumb:

Weedinhoe 05-09-2016 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LindaLou (Post 9813817)
Dig a retention pond next to each large plant, i.e. tomato, eggplant, cuke, etc. The pond I manage to dig is maybe 18 inches across and 6 inches deep. The idea is to catch rain in a pond that will slowly leach water to the surrounding soil where the plant has roots. I fill mine with pine cones in an attempt to slow evaporation, kinda like Los Angeles did with the thousands of plastic balls in their city reservoir. Can't hurt, might help!

Thank you for the input! I had never heard of this mini-pond before. This reservoir idea might be just the thing for the three young fruit trees that are out of hose range out back. They have bowls too but are on a slight downhill slant so the water slowly erodes the edge of the bowl. Hmmm, maybe situate this mini-pond on the uphill side...

I think I will try it with one and see how it works. :)

In addition to the veggie bowls, I usually chop small holes into the bed surface with the hoe right before mulching. That also helps prevent water from running to one area of the bed just in case it hasn't been raked perfectly level.

st0n3 05-09-2016 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Weedinhoe (Post 9809441)
Water conservation. Every place has dry spells to contend with. However it sometimes seems that there's a dome over this location that diverts rain around us. There's got to be some geographical aspect that splits approaching storms to either side of us, raining a mile away and leaving us high and dry. That can sometimes be a blessing though when it's rough weather that's coming!

Yup...
I've been watching (for nearly 30 years)... the rain storms coming from tx across la, ms, al, and then instead of raining on my patch of gods green earth... Split... And go to the north and south, leaving middle ga in the high and dry....
I understand how the Appalachians act as a chimney, and draw the rain north... But I'm not sure what pulls the rain south.... All I know... Is we see a lot of drought in middle ga.

I practice a lot of drought proofing... Amendments and mulch... And search out varieties that want to grow in my garden.... And encourage all self sowed plants... Those are the genes I want to encourage...

I'm not into trying to rake my garden perfectly level.
Something I saw on public tv a while back... The woodland isn't perfectly level, and thrives.... With different plants finding the terrain best suited...

Weedinhoe 05-10-2016 08:27 AM

Never a dull moment...

Last night I was watering the garden. Some motion caught my eye and I turned to see the six cows in the pasture trotting along the side fence towards the end of the garden where I was. Hmmm.... there's something wrong with this picture.... dang! It took a few seconds to realize it but then saw that one of the cows was on MY side of the fence! Oh my....

So I slowly walked towards the cow and it spooked, turning around and heading back down the fence line towards the road while it's buddies inside the fence followed along. It romped through the glads bed before finally using the pathway. And once it got to the end of the fence it kept going out into the road. Oh crap! Fortunately no cars or trucks were coming and the cow stood there a minute looking around before realizing it was away from its friends and it went back to the front of the fence line where the rest of them were.

I hustled up to the house to call the neighbor and he was already on it, heading to his end of the fence. His wife was in her car and already parked at my end of the fence to block the cow from coming into my yard. I started waving my arms and hollering "Hep! Hep! Hep!", something that one of the Alaskan show guys always hollers on his cattle drives. By golly, the cow and friends started running back down the fence towards the gate end. At that point, I let the neighbor have all the fun as my knees were tired of hustling.

No damage to the glads and all's well. Just a little bit of country excitement!

LindaLou 05-11-2016 06:03 PM

I would like to have seen that! :) :D:

FarmerChad 05-11-2016 07:20 PM

Got to thinking about your watering situation.

I know you said soaker hoses and drip emitters are out, have you considered "soaker dripline"?

Comes in both 1/4 and 1/2 inch. Its a combination of drip emitter and soaker all in one. Its a hose with holes pre-punched. You just cut to length, unlike soaker hose.

Weedinhoe 05-12-2016 08:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FarmerChad (Post 9853377)
Got to thinking about your watering situation.

I know you said soaker hoses and drip emitters are out, have you considered "soaker dripline"?

Comes in both 1/4 and 1/2 inch. Its a combination of drip emitter and soaker all in one. Its a hose with holes pre-punched. You just cut to length, unlike soaker hose.

Thanks for your input, FC. I really appreciate it. I've thought long and hard about alternatives and all of them seem to require more money and especially time than just spending an hour "visiting" with all of the plants in the beds while watering.

I have 17 beds, 4' x 18'. Most have two rows of plantings, one down each side of the bed so I'd have to run a drip line down both sides of the beds. Then I would have to install some kind of manifold or other system to connect the lines from each bed into maybe a section. Then connect the sections with another manifold and connect that to the hose from the well. Still, that would require going down to the garden periodically to turn one section off and another one on or spend big bucks for a manifold with timer that would do that automatically.

A few days ago while watering I discovered one danged cabbage moth had somehow gotten under the netting over the cabbage/broccoli bed. During last night's watering I discovered munching on those leaves so out came the bT spray. And I also discovered another fire ant hill starting in one bed so out came the detergent jug. So while it takes an hour to water, it does have its benefits. :rolleyes:


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