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-   -   Weedinhoe's 2016-2020 Garden (https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=428297)

Twicebitten 04-15-2016 01:56 PM

Your detailed notes interest me. I have kind of half-heartedly kept notes, mainly because I was moving around a bit and didn't know from one year to the next if I would even be in the same time zone, much less growing zone. Then I read about how detailed Thomas Jefferson's notes were. There is just so much to try to remember, especially when trying something "off-the-wall" or different, that if you DON'T write it down chances are eventually you will make the same mistake.

Now that I'm settled a bit, I'll try to do much the same. My tomatoes are just about to give up in the yogurt cups they are in. I started much too early (anyone recognize the symptoms?) and have them about 18-24 inches tall, watering twice daily just to keep alive. My garden was plowed for the first time a few weeks ago, and my neighbor is unable to disc it for me until Monday. So.......Monday it is.

That will give me the weekend to finish the electric fence going around the garden, the apple trees, and the thornless blackberries.

Thanks for your threads folks, they are great motivators!!

Weedinhoe 04-16-2016 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Twicebitten (Post 9505905)
There is just so much to try to remember, especially when trying something "off-the-wall" or different, that if you DON'T write it down chances are eventually you will make the same mistake.

My tomatoes are just about to give up in the yogurt cups they are in. I started much too early (anyone recognize the symptoms?)

Exactly! Too much to remember! I believe it was Einstein who said something to the effect that you don't have to memorize complicated formulas and information. You just have to remember where to look it up when you need it.

Yep, I do recognize the "planted too early" syndrome although mine aren't as big as yours. LOL! I shifted mine up into 16 oz Solo cups last week and now they're touching the lights again. Out they go this afternoon onto the front porch to start hardening off. A quick look at my tomato starting data shows the seeds were started March 19 and were probably at perfect transplant size April 9. Three weeks! Seems way too quick but if I had checked '15 and '14 start-to-transplant times I would have seen four weeks.

We're to have super weather for the next week. Highs in upper 70's-low 80's, lows in the 50's-60's after tomorrow morning. Dang! I am soooo tempted to plant beans tomorrow but it never fails that we have one final frost around the end of the month. I think I will compromise and plant one of the three bean beds tomorrow and the other two next weekend after checking out the ten day forecast at that time. Then if the weather turns I'll only have one bed to set up hoops and cover on.

The Hamburg Rooted Parsley directly sown into the garden on March 23 is finally coming up! I had about given up on it. 25 days! The ones started indoors in cell packs on the same day were up on the 30th and are now 2" tall. I need to put them out on the porch to harden off a few days and get 'em in the ground because of the developing root. You don't really transplant carrots and this parsley is supposed to have that big old root on it. I love running experiments like this.

The first blooms are on the sugar snap peas. :)

Weedinhoe 04-20-2016 11:51 AM

The weather has been fantastic so I've been planting. Yesterday we put in a double bed of 'Duke' bush beans and a half bed of 'Bountiful' bush beans. The 'Bountiful' is new to me and is a quick 45 day bean. I'm trialing it's taste for possible inclusion in the fall bush bean lineup along with 'Contender', another quickie that did fine last fall. Next week I'll put in a double bed of 'Nash' bush bean and sow the other half of the 'Bountiful' bed with 'Golden Rod' wax beans. All told that should be 108' of beans, enough to can all I need and for fresh eating too.

Today the tomatoes got planted out after hardening off on the front porch for a while. Bacterial wilt in the garden kills my tomatoes right when beautiful green tomatoes are starting to ripen. For the last two years I've planted tomatoes in 15 gallon nursery pots in the back yard and they do pretty well. Today we planted out:

2 'Celebrity', chosen for their disease resistance. They always do better for me than a lot of others.
2 'Early Girl', another that does well for me.
1 'Viva' paste, one that can catch early blight and still produce. Rather large paste type tomatoes, larger than 'Roma'.
1 'Martino's Roma' - It was a freebie and I'm growing one to see how it compares with 'Viva'.
1 'Juliet' cherry. Sooo sweet!
1 unnamed freebie "paste/salad variety" sent by Shumway this year. We'll see.

There's also that "Large Red Cherry" from Ferry Morse that was started Dec 25. It's now in a big bucket in front of the house and is loaded with green cherry tomatoes. That thing gets huge, the cherry tomatoes are also a bit larger than normal and they have a really good flavor.

This evening I will set out the potted peppers that were also started Dec 25 as part of that germination test. They're already producing peppers in the pots! There's one each of 'Red Marconi' (they do a lot better for me than bells), 'Maule's Red Hot' cayenne (makes really large cayenne peppers) and a 'Mucho Nacho' jalapeno. The other peppers just came out from under the lights this morning and have begun the hardening off.

So off we go!

Weedinhoe 04-20-2016 12:11 PM

Two weeks ago I was casually looking over my empty pot pile upon which was tossed a defunct wheel-around hose reel cart. Out of curiosity (and having nothing better to do at the time) I grabbed a few tools and disassembled the reel from the cart. At that moment the Garden Muse and Recycle Muse must have put their heads together and sent an inspiration my way. Part of the hose reel looked like the perfect thing to make a pole bean tower. So I thought about it a while and yesterday put the thing together.

This is the completed bean tower. This morning I filled the pots and planted four 'Purple Trionfo Violetto' pole beans in each bucket. I might thin to the three strongest seedlings if they all come up. Beans don't have huge root systems so I'm thinking three per pot would be OK. This system involves no digging in the ground, is easily watered and can be stowed away after the season. Time will tell how well it functions. The pots are set 22" out from the edge to the tire rim and 27" apart from each other around the perimeter. The whole thing measures about 5.5' across so it fits in an approximate 6' x 6' area. There's plenty of room in the garden here for pole beans but I wanted to play with something that maybe folks could use in settings where they don't have a garden or not much room.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=52801

This is the top of the tower. It's part of the old hose reel cart (the part you wind the hose on) and it fit perfectly on top of the 2x2 pole. I've tied baling twine to it to run to the buckets.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=52793

The ground was so hard (old orange rock hard clay, probably from the construction of the house) that the post hole diggers didn't make a dent in it. My sister suggested using an old homemade sprinkler as a support for the center pole and just tie the pole to it. This sprinkler was given to me a long time ago. It's made from an old tire rim with a pipe welded to it and an impact head screwed on top of the pipe. But it worked perfectly to support the tower pole:

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=52785

Finally, the buckets. They are "full gallon" nursery pots and as such already have a drainage hole right in the middle of the bottom. The thought was to just stake them to the ground and the stake would also function as a tie-off for the strings. Of course, the ground was too hard to pound in wooden stakes so I pounded pilot holes with a 3/4" piece of rebar I had. Perfect fit for the stakes. I added a nail at an angle to the top of each stake to function as the string tie-off so that the string wouldn't slip off. The pots are set 22" out from the edge of the tire rim and 27" apart from each other around the perimeter.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=52777

Lord Darwath 04-20-2016 12:31 PM

Awesome use of materials.

Personally, I don't care for the teepee trellis designs as I tend to miss a lot of beans growing on the inside. YMMV

Last year I just hammered 2"x2"s into the ground in a line, attached more 2"x2"s to span the tops from post to post and ran cotton clothesline for the plant supports, wrapping it around the horizontal board at the top and looped through tent stakes at the bottom. The vine foliage still gets dense enough to miss a few beans here and there, but not as bad as if I couldn't get to both sides easily. I have a clay soil, but it's not so hard that I can't work with it.

st0n3 04-20-2016 01:33 PM

I can't see the pictures... Of the bean tower...
Nm... See 2 of them now...

"Full gallon" nursery pots don't seem like much to me.
My beans are already growing out the bottom of gallon nursery pots as week old seedlings...
I've seen bean roots that stretched across a good bit of real estate... And gallon pots are very difficult to keep moist in southern summers...
Was me... I'd get out the mattock... See how much of the clay I could break up while the weather is wet....
That stuff gets real hard in the summer... But it usually isn't bad during the rainy season.

Weedinhoe 04-20-2016 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by st0n3 (Post 9567969)
I can't see the pictures... Of the bean tower...
Nm... See 2 of them now...

"Full gallon" nursery pots don't seem like much to me.
My beans are already growing out the bottom of gallon nursery pots as week old seedlings...
I've seen bean roots that stretched across a good bit of real estate... And gallon pots are very difficult to keep moist in southern summers...
Was me... I'd get out the mattock... See how much of the clay I could break up while the weather is wet....
That stuff gets real hard in the summer... But it usually isn't bad during the rainy season.

Yeah, this is just an experiment. Fortunately I have plenty (for me) of raised beds to grow what I want and don't have to use the area where this tower is. And I could have used 3, 5 or 10 gallon pots but didn't want to waste the soil on this. It's just a play thing to see what I could make out of "stuff". :)

Weedinhoe 04-21-2016 07:51 AM

Last evening I set out the twelve Hamburg Rooted Parsley plants and my sister set out the zinnias, some 'Bolero' dwarf marigolds and a few strawberry spinach plants.

The spinach plants are another test of the "food hiding in plain sight" thing. It's one of those "the young leaves taste like spinach" plants but this thing is supposed to have edible berries too. Depending on whose description you're reading, the taste of the berries is like it or hate it. Some info on this "new to me" thing:
http://subsistencepatternfoodgarden....y-spinach.html

I also got a few end-of-bed trellises repaired and planted some pole beans to each one. One got the purple beans planted around the bean tower. Another got the last effort of growing 'Christmas' lima. The third got 'Lazy Housewife', supposedly the return of an old variety that has three effective uses. You can pick and eat fresh when young, you can wait and use them as shellies or let them dry completely and shell for dry beans. Of course, any pole bean will dry if you let them go but this one is supposed to be very good in all three stages. We'll see.. if the bean beetles let them get past the shellie stage.

As I was gathering up garden implements last evening my eyes fell on the guy wire attached to the power pole in the yard. Hmmm, if I planted a few pole beans around it, there would be more food hiding in plain site if someone didn't know beans about beans!

Lord Darwath 04-21-2016 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Weedinhoe (Post 9578553)
As I was gathering up garden implements last evening my eyes fell on the guy wire attached to the power pole in the yard. Hmmm, if I planted a few pole beans around it, there would be more food hiding in plain site if someone didn't know beans about beans!

Not sure if I would recommend that one. Maybe in a societal breakdown, sure, but otherwise you bean stalks will just keep climbing up and up that wire and you won't be able to reach half your beans. Or at least that's been my experience with too tall of a climbing structure. I've learned to keep my poles to around 6'.

st0n3 04-21-2016 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lord Darwath (Post 9580521)
Not sure if I would recommend that one. Maybe in a societal breakdown, sure, but otherwise you bean stalks will just keep climbing up and up that wire and you won't be able to reach half your beans. Or at least that's been my experience with too tall of a climbing structure. I've learned to keep my poles to around 6'.

Ah....
Those beans out of reach... Next year's seed... Or dried beans over the winter...
I see no reason to worry about the out of reach beans.
Although.... They use some harsh chems on those utility poles... Might not actually be safe to eat... Maybe plant hyacinth beans there instead.
Or research bioremediation...

Re:
Strawberry spinach....
I've planted that at my house a number of times with absolutely deplorable results... Too hot here in GA...
Good luck, and maybe save me some seed if you can get it to grow...

Weedinhoe 04-21-2016 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by st0n3 (Post 9584313)
Ah....
Those beans out of reach... Next year's seed... Or dried beans over the winter...
I see no reason to worry about the out of reach beans.
Although.... They use some harsh chems on those utility poles... Might not actually be safe to eat... Maybe plant hyacinth beans there instead.
Or research bioremediation...

Re:
Strawberry spinach....
I've planted that at my house a number of times with absolutely deplorable results... Too hot here in GA...
Good luck, and maybe save me some seed if you can get it to grow...

The beans would be climbing up the guy wire, not the pole. I hadn't thought about the dried bean aspect of it but this will be a good test of the whole "three kinds of beans" concept behind the 'Lazy Housewife' bean. Eat what you can reach and when everything else dries, pull down the vines and grab the dry ones.

Thanks for the tip about the heat! Sometimes I forget that the people who write these articles probably don't live in our kind of climate. The spinach sure will be getting some where it's planted but maybe I can rig up some kind of shade for that after-3pm blast. Hmmm, maybe try some in the fall too and see how cold tolerant it is or isn't.

LindaLou 04-21-2016 04:45 PM

Admire your upcycle bean tower! Great idea.

Weedinhoe 04-22-2016 09:19 AM

Yesterday afternoon I got the corn planted, so now there are five 18' rows of 'Silver Queen' in (want more but that's all the room I can give to it) and hopefully they will get rained on this afternoon. Since that area of the garden is the one that always floods with gusher rains, I decided not to water in the rows ahead of today's rain "just in case" we get more than a good shower. If it doesn't rain, out comes the hose.

My sister mulched all of the tomato pots with wheat straw and weeded out the daylily bed down along the garden so progress is being made.

The peppers still need to be put in the ground and that will happen today. There are also a few other oddball things to set out and about like 'Aunt Molly's Ground Cherry', of which there are six plants to put here and there in different environments just to see what works best where. It's another "food in plain site" item I'm trialing.

And there are more flowers to start in cell packs (some freebie asters and cosmos). Oops, can't forget that the okra sets need starting. They do better for me by doing that as opposed to direct seeding.

That leaves only the cukes, squash, and melons to sow and the eggplants to set out. That calls for a little warmer soil temp before that happens. They usually go in around May 1, which is right around the corner.

Weedinhoe 04-28-2016 01:48 PM

It's been a long ten days getting beds forked and planted and I think I screwed up my left shoulder doing that. Fortunately the garden is basically planted. Here are some photos of the garden as it is now.

This is the lower right quadrant. The bed in the foreground has spinach on the left and collards and kale on the right. Today I was going to pick the last of the spinach and pull it all out as it is suffering in the heat. Postponing that until tomorrow.

The next bed was planted yesterday with 'Double Yield' cukes. This variety has more flowers than I've ever seen on cuke vines! The bed behind the cukes has broccoli on one side and cabbage on the other. The next bed was planted with two rows of 'Duke' bush beans and they're up and going. In the empty area behind the bean bed there are five hills of various winter squash spaced out, two watermelon hills and one of a freebie cantaloupe type melon.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=53385

This is the lower left quadrant. In the foreground the bed has various peppers, one ground cherry and an eggplant that will get set out today. There are 'Lazy Housewife' pole beans under the trellis on the end. They just popped up yesterday.

Behind the pepper bed is the cuke bed I planted yesterday with 'Homemade Pickles' with those transplanted 'Sabre' peas on the end trellis. The next bed has two rows of 'Nash' bush beans planted two days ago with a few leftover 'Ishikura' scallions.

In the open area there will be a row of okra (got that row and holes prepped this morning) and then there are five rows of 'Silver Queen' corn which popped up yesterday. Once those roses are finished with the first round of blooms, I need to whack them. They were planted at different times and are all different sizes. Brown Turkey fig to the left.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=53393

This is the upper right quadrant. The bed at the bottom has 'SugarSprint' snap peas on one side and 'Red Faro' quinoa on the other side. It looks like the quinoa is trying to go to seed but it's too short to do that. I'm guessing it's the heat, as I found out quinoa is a cold lover and not suitable for this area. Live and learn!

Uphill from the peas is a bed with turnips on one end and beets on the other with purple pole beans planted under the trellis. Above that is another bed with two rows of 'Wando' peas and 'Eureka' cukes planted under the trellis. The bed at the top (not visible) has five blueberry bushes that were planted last fall.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=53409

This is the upper left quadrant of the garden. Right to left, the first bed on the right has bush beans. The 'Bountiful' (a quick 45 day bean) are starting to pop up. The other side of the bed was just planted with 'Golden Rod', a yellow wax bean, two days ago. In that bed is also the Alabama Blue collard plant I'm letting go to seed.

The next bed has 2 rows of 'Wando' peas, full of blooms and yesterday I saw the first pod. Next to the pea bed will be two hills each of yellow crookneck squash and zucchini. One of each has already been seeded and coming up; the other two will be sown in three weeks. There are onions planted down each side of the bed.

The fourth bed next to the wheelbarrow has the 'Hamburg Rooted Parsley' down the sides with an 'Aunt Mary's Ground Cherry' in the middle with dwarf French marigolds also down the middle.


https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=53401

Now it's time to start mulching and shifting into maintenance gear. At least until some of the early stuff is done and it's time to plant succession stuff.


FarmerChad 04-28-2016 02:07 PM

Very nice use of your space, and raised beds.

Weedinhoe 04-28-2016 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FarmerChad (Post 9681673)
Very nice use of your space, and raised beds.

Thanks! I try to use every bit of space in the beds although sometimes it gets a bit crowded if there's a new thing in there I'm trying and not used to.

I converted most of the garden to raised beds when I retired five years ago. It makes amending the soil and crop rotation so much easier to keep track of. :thumb:

roseman 04-28-2016 03:07 PM

I don't see any photo's.

Weedinhoe 04-28-2016 03:15 PM

Hmmm, I can see them and I think FarmerChad could, but I wonder if anyone else is having a problem seeing them.

For whatever reason, I did have a devil of a time posting them. That's never happened before.

LindaLou 04-28-2016 05:32 PM

I can see the photos just fine.

I'm viewing from a desktop if that makes any difference?

Weedinhoe 04-29-2016 08:06 PM

It was a real stinker today, hitting 91 this afternoon. We haven't had a 90+ temp in April since 2012. No rain until *maybe* Sunday. The air conditioner was turned on around noon for the first time this season.

This afternoon around 4:30 was the first use of the sprinkler in the garden for the summer and I got the lower half of the garden watered for about an hour on each side. Everything is so dry. Gotta help that new seed in the ground that needs to come up! Will do the upper half of the garden tomorrow morning early.


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