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-   -   Weedinhoe's 2016-2020 Garden (https://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=428297)

Twicebitten 03-24-2016 06:23 AM

"It was also carrot sowing day. Nine feet each of 'Bolero', 'Dragon' (a freebie), 'Ingot' and 'Kuroda Long' along the edges of the bed that will eventually have peppers and eggplant down the middle. Of the four varieties I've only done 'Bolero' before."

I thought for a split second you were growing 9 ft carrots. Figured two things.....one would probably do you 4 would be too many; and I gotta GET me some of THOSE.

That's probably why I never finished school?!?!

Weedinhoe 03-24-2016 07:58 AM

"I thought for a split second you were growing 9 ft carrots."

LOL! Pondering the implications of a 9' carrot ... I would probably need a BIG backhoe to loosen the soil that deep for 9' carrots. Can you imagine how big the seed would be? Use a wheelbarrow to dump it in the hole. The backhoe bucket to backfill the hole. And a backhoe and a chain to pull the thing out. Bwaaaahahahaha!

"Do you have your canning jars ready?"

Yeah, they stay ready! I thought about canning up a few pints of collard greens yesterday from what plants are left but then found a new recipe to use some and decided to give a bunch to a good friend. The 'Alabama Blue' is going to seed and I think the 'Flash' are fixin' to. Maybe one more cutting and then none until the spring batch is ready. That's ok, the kale is still going.

Weedinhoe 03-25-2016 05:01 PM

Well, I've had the first two casualties in the garden not counting the 'Sabre' peas that wouldn't germinate. Two of the recently set out broccoli plants got snipped off, probably cutworm. They are rarely a problem. So I guess I need to make and install some collars and also spray some bT.

The northern part of that big line of storms coming through the South yesterday dissipated before it got here. Dry, dry, dry. We got just shy of an inch on March 3 and have had only 5/100" since then with lots of wind sucking the moisture out.

I sure hope it's not going to be one of those droughty years again.

LindaLou 03-25-2016 09:00 PM

It's only March and per NWS my area is already behind in rainfall. Not looking like a good summer for the south.

Twicebitten 03-26-2016 06:16 AM

Weedinhoe, I am starting my first garden in my new place, and although I've heard about bt I've never used it. What's it for exactly; how does it work; can you use it on all crops; and in what ways can it be applied? I'm sure I could look it up, but hey inquiring minds want to know?!

Weedinhoe 03-26-2016 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Twicebitten (Post 9224673)
Weedinhoe, I am starting my first garden in my new place, and although I've heard about bt I've never used it. What's it for exactly; how does it work; can you use it on all crops; and in what ways can it be applied? I'm sure I could look it up, but hey inquiring minds want to know?!

bT is bacillus thuringiensis, a bacterium that is deadly to all kinds of caterpillar types but very user friendly. It is OK for organic gardens and you can use it up to day of harvest. Once ingested by caterpillars, cutworms, tomato hornworms, etc, it kills them. Works on any crops that get infested by these critters. The first time I spy munches on the tomato plants, they get sprayed with bT! That usually ends the problem for about six weeks.

You can find bT in liquid form for mixing into a spray or in powdered form for dusting. For me, spray is the easier to apply. I've found the liquid forms under the trade names of Dipel and Thuricide (I've used either one the store has) and some powdered labeled as WormWhipper. There are probably others out there but that's what I've found around here at the local feed & seed or big box garden centers. Just look on the back for the ingredients list and check for bT as the main ingredient.

Twicebitten 03-26-2016 12:15 PM

Good to know. I don't even like putting chemicals on the yard, much less the garden.

Weedinhoe 03-27-2016 08:43 AM

I forgot to add that there is a specific variety of bT that targets the Colorado potato beetle. That would be "bacillus thuringiensis var. san diego". It's helped keep them off the eggplant.

I don't like sprays either but without some I wouldn't have a garden. My list of preventatives is small but works well for me. Other than bT I use pyrethrum (organic spray derived from chrysanthemums and inexpensive) spray for flea beetles and for aphid infestations that survive heavy water spraying. It works really well.

Then I found something a few years ago called Serenade. Had to order it online as I couldn't find it anywhere else but I think it's starting to be seen on shelves. It's a broad spectrum, organically ok spray that targets fungus on veggies, flowers and shrubs. It works pretty good if you use it as a preventative. Once fungus gets going, Serenade won't "cure" it (nothing will, actually) but can help keep it from spreading. However if it rains, Serenade needs to be reapplied.

Between these three "tools", I manage to keep garden problems down to a dull roar. :)

Weedinhoe 03-30-2016 05:32 PM

Things are slowly moving along in the garden. Rain is supposed to move in tomorrow and Friday. Good!

Today I pulled the first radishes from an unnamed freebie mix that came with the Shumway seeds in January. Hmmmm, guessing Cherry Belle for the ones on the left but no idea what the purple ones in the middle are or the others on the right are. I might have to e-mail them and ask.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=50513

The peas are coming along and just starting to send out tendrils. It won't be long before they start climbing the fence. They're big enough that after this incoming rain I will mulch them with leaves to keep the moisture in and the weeds down.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=50521

I have a question on turnips. This is only my second year growing them so I'm still experimenting. So far I've sown them four times, two 3' rows across the bed for each sowing, starting at the left. The first two rows were both sown on Feb 2, the second two rows on Feb 19, the third two rows on Feb 29. The fourth sowing on Mar 19 is out of the photo to the right because they've just popped up.

But check out the growth of the rows. The right hand one of each pair is a lot larger than the left hand one. Now why is that, I wonder? Anybody have a guess?

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=50529

Hamburg Rooted Parsley Update: The first two seedlings have germinated in the six pack that was sown straight out of the pack. No sign of any in the pack whose seeds were soaked first and no sign of anything up yet that was directly sown in the garden. Looking at my records from last spring it took the regular parsley 9 days to germinate. Patience, Weed.... patience. We're only on Day 7.

Weedinhoe 04-02-2016 10:21 AM

Mother Nature decided to cure the dry spell by delivering 5.2" of rain yesterday. Some April Fool present! There's also standing water between some of the raised beds. It's a good thing there are about 3-4 weeks before I plant corn and winter squash in this lower part of the garden.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=50705

On the other hand, the greens are loving the wet, cooler weather as it was getting quite warm for a spell. Front to back, 4 kale, 6 collards, 2 Chinese cabbage with a few onions on each side, spinach and radishes. I need to cut the kale and spinach. Thank goodness the collards aren't ready yet. One *can* have too many greens at once, at least I can! That's why I only planted four kale plants. I've not found a good way to store excess. I did read where one person dehydrated and powdered it and stored the powder as an emergency vitamin supplement. Might think on that.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=50713

Weedinhoe 04-04-2016 10:22 AM

Today I started some more herbs; cilantro 'Confetti', coriander (1st time for that), dill 'Diana', parsley 'Gigante D'Italia, red Shiso (for Korean stuff) and catnip for the four-footed furries. The variegated cat grass is already up and 4" tall (the cats are showing no interest); also the Fernleaf Dill. No signs of life on the thyme yet but it's old seed (2013). However I have had five year old thyme seed come up before so there's still hope. :)

Yesterday when I cut more spinach I noticed that the fall planting is starting to bolt. That's ok as the spring planting is about ready.

The tomatoes were seeded on March 19, six weeks before anticipated set out. That might have been a week too early as they're growing fast. I can shift mine up to larger pots and intend to but I'm hoping that six pack of 'Celebrity' I'm growing for someone else slows down!

In this pick the peppers are on the right to the rear. That pack up front on the right is one of the two 'Hamburg Rooted Parsley' packs. Still none showing in the garden from direct seed.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51009

inMichigan 04-04-2016 11:26 AM

A lot of enviable green in your pictures! Mother Nature is playing April Fools with us as well. With your tomatoes, it might help slow down their shoot growth if you place them deeper in the pots. Burying them up to just under their leaves should help them focus on advantageous roots.

Weedinhoe 04-04-2016 12:31 PM

The tomatoes in the foreground are in cups 3" tall and they'll be going into 6" deep pots this week and, if the weather cooperates, out onto the front porch the following week to start hardening off. You'd think after 30 years of doing this I'd learn to start them a bit later. But every year that "gotta start some seed" itch gets going and it's usually the tomatoes that get started. :rolleyes:

Our last frost is usually around April 15th but it seems every year we get one more "cover up' night not long after I set out tomatoes. It doesn't matter when I set them out... there will always be one more nippy night. LOL!

Weedinhoe 04-08-2016 01:54 PM

My sister and I took a quick overnight jaunt up to Cherokee NC. A spring trip there is always fascinating as they are usually about three weeks behind us in blooming trees, etc. Right now their redbud trees are in full bloom and the dogwood blooms are just starting to open. Our redbuds here are long gone and the dogwoods are in full glory. Their tree leaves are just starting to push out and we have actual shade here under the oaks and part shade under the pecans. The black walnuts in the background are still naked as jaybirds

Meanwhile, the Grandaddy (or Grancy) Graybeard tree (Chionanthus virginicus) is in full bloom next to the garden and the Knockout roses are starting to do their thing. Spring is in full swing.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51289

That little tomato seedling from December now sits in a 15 gallon nursery pot. It's loaded with blooms and setting cherry tomatoes. I'll probably have to drag it into the house Saturday night as they're calling for a low of 33.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51281

The peppers and fernleaf dill from December are also enjoying life right now in one gallon pots, patiently awaiting frost-free nights and warmer garden soil so they can be planted out into the garden. That will probably be about three more weeks. Meanwhile, the peppers are setting fruit. The two little pots above the peppers are Aronia 'Viking' or Chokeberry that arrived in the mail today. They are a part of the "guerilla garden" plan.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51273

Weedinhoe 04-11-2016 03:51 PM

Today I noticed a couple of the 'Dragon' radishes pushing out of the ground, asking to be pulled so I did. Wow, this is the first time I've tried them and I was amazed by the color. Got them from Jung.

https://www.jungseed.com/P/03336/Dragon+Hybrid+Radish

Looks like they performed as advertised. They weren't hot tasting either. Almost a tad sweet. I'll do a lot more this fall.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51705

Weedinhoe 04-12-2016 04:25 PM

Yesterday I set out the last six cabbage and broccoli plants, making sure the deer netting is in place.

The rain is past, the sun is out and there's a week of 70 temps ahead. The soil temp is 75 right now at 3". I couldn't stand it any more and had to scratch the planting itch so I planted two hills of summer squash this afternoon, one yellow straightneck and one gray zucchini. Will plant the same again in four weeks. Should an unexpected cold snap arrive I'll put a wall 'o water around each. If that doesn't work, there's plenty more seed to resow.

I also started a six pack of sweet basil. And so it goes on a pretty afternoon. :)

wilderness bushman 04-12-2016 06:35 PM

happen to read a bit of your garden thread ,,,lol just to get a garden fix,,,still froze in here ,, my thoughts about the turnips is that its sort of a two fold problem,,,the first row to the left might of been slow from different water availability ,,,the outside row was drier ,,,the third row I think is shaded by second row,,and so on,,,thats just from what I can see in pic ,,,soil looks close enough to same,, look at how the shadows fall from the even rows onto the odd,,

Weedinhoe 04-13-2016 07:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wilderness bushman (Post 9464401)
happen to read a bit of your garden thread ,,,lol just to get a garden fix,,,still froze in here ,, my thoughts about the turnips is that its sort of a two fold problem,,,the first row to the left might of been slow from different water availability ,,,the outside row was drier ,,,the third row I think is shaded by second row,,and so on,,,thats just from what I can see in pic ,,,soil looks close enough to same,, look at how the shadows fall from the even rows onto the odd,,

Interesting observations and thank you for those. Perhaps next time I will try planting the staggers 90 degrees from how they were done this time. That way they should all receive the same amount of sunlight.

As of yesterday it seems that the shorter turnip rows have caught up a lot in size so maybe it will all work out in the end. Go figure. :rolleyes:

Weedinhoe 04-14-2016 10:38 AM

This morning I was playing with screen shots in the Preview function on this Mac. Here are two shots of my garden planning I keep in Excel spreadsheets.

The first is part of the planning page listing what will be grown and various other data to include seed info, start date, seed germination, transplanting, etc. When something is actually started I paint that date green so I can easily see what's left to do. Varieties colored tan are for fall planting. Red items are seeds I have but will not be planting. Not shown is the rest of the list (squash, tomatoes, etc) and the herb and annuals sections.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51977

This is the upper part of the garden map showing what's planned for each raised bed this year. It is to scale, one square = 1'. Under each bed I list what's been in those beds for the past several season so as to help with crop rotation.

Putting all of this together helps to pass those long winter days! It took a while to get used to regularly capturing all the data but it sure helps in the long run. Now I'm addicted. :eek:

https://www.survivalistboards.com/pic...ictureid=51985

LindaLou 04-14-2016 08:50 PM

Wow! Impressive!


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