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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-13-2020 07:55 PM
Henrykjr My wife and I said the same thing!

HK
01-13-2020 07:53 PM
Cabinet Maker Wouldn’t it be cool if when you call back to thank him after you’ve received the medals, you’re told that they’ve never had a Michael working there.....
01-13-2020 07:41 PM
Henrykjr I wanted to share this story with you because I got a pretty good chuckle out of it today.

The "America needs Fatima" website produced a St. Michael Medal with the "Michael of the Morning" pray on the back of it:

You can see the medal on this page here:
https://www.americaneedsfatima.org/A...e-morning.html

Anyway....the Michael medal is for first responders, military etc...... since the medal was out of stock I called and spoke to a lady before Christmas and told here I wanted to buy 1000 of these medals......on top of the blessed Rosaries we give away.....we want to give a blessed medal to all the police we see in our daily lives.... the woman took our name and info and never called back....I'm sure she just got busy and forgot.

So I called today...here is how the call went.

Hello this is Michael at America needs Fatima....I told him that I was looking for the woman I spoke about the medals. Michael says to me....no worries Henry.....I'm going to take care of you right now.

Within 5 minutes of talking to Michael......the Michael of the Morning Medals are on their way.

Coincidence? I think not!

HK
01-06-2020 05:30 PM
Pinhead
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
Epiphany

Today is the feast of Epiphany. This commemorates the day that the "Magi", the 3 visitors from the East - commonly known as the wise men, or King Balthazar, King Melchior and King Caspar (the three kings), arrived at the stable where Christ was born, and worshiped Him, bringing Him gifts of gold, frankincense, and Myrrh. It is the conclusion of the Christmas season, and gave rise to the modern term "epiphany" which is a noun meaning "a realization" or "a discovery." Merry Christmas to all of you! The feast is ended. Christ is born in Bethlehem. Alleluia!!! Alleluia!!! Alleluia!!!
http://www.carmelites.net/news/chalk...ouse-blessing/
Quote:
On the Feast of the Epiphany, the family gathers to ask God’s blessing on their home and on those who live in or visit the home. It is an invitation for Jesus to be a daily guest in our home, our comings and goings, our conversations, our work and play, our joys and sorrows.

A traditional way of doing this is to use chalk to write above the home’s entrance. It can also be written somewhere inside the home.

+20 C M B 18+

The letters C, M, B have two meanings:
• They are the initials of the traditional names of the three magi: Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar.
• They also abbreviate the Latin words Christus mansionem benedicat, “May Christ bless the house.”

The “+” signs represent the cross and 2018 is the year.

Here’s a suggested format for the blessing:

All make the Sign of the Cross.

Leader: “Peace be to this house and to all who dwell here, in the name of the Lord.

All: Thanks be to God.

Reader: When Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea,
in the days of King Herod,
behold, magi from the east arrived in Jerusalem, saying,
“Where is the newborn king of the Jews?
We saw his star at its rising
and have come to do him homage.”
After their audience with the king they set out.
And behold, the star that they had seen at its rising preceded them,
until it came and stopped over the place where the child was.
They were overjoyed at seeing the star,
and on entering the house
they saw the child with Mary his mother.
They prostrated themselves and did him homage.
Then they opened their treasures
and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.
And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod,
they departed for their country by another way.

The word of the Lord.

ALL: Thanks be to God

Using chalk, write on the outside of your house or inside above the front main entrance,
above or next to an entrance:

+20 Christus Mansionem Benedicat 18+ or +20 C M B 18+

These words mean. “May Christ bless this house” or you may use the names of the Magi

+20 Caspar Melchior Balthazar 18+ or +20 C M B 18+

All: Lord God of heaven and earth, you revealed your only begotten Son to every nation by the guidance of a star. Bless this house and all who live here and all who visit. May we be blessed with health, kindness of heart, gentleness and the keeping of your law. Fill us with the light of Christ, that our love for each other may go out to all. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.
01-05-2020 11:15 PM
Atticus Epiphany

Today is the feast of Epiphany. This commemorates the day that the "Magi", the 3 visitors from the East - commonly known as the wise men, or King Balthazar, King Melchior and King Caspar (the three kings), arrived at the stable where Christ was born, and worshiped Him, bringing Him gifts of gold, frankincense, and Myrrh. It is the conclusion of the Christmas season, and gave rise to the modern term "epiphany" which is a noun meaning "a realization" or "a discovery." Merry Christmas to all of you! The feast is ended. Christ is born in Bethlehem. Alleluia!!! Alleluia!!! Alleluia!!!
12-18-2019 07:13 AM
Watchingtheweasels ...another thing I would add that I think expect is true for both Roman Catholic and Orthodox congregations is that on a per capita basis there are far fewer “first generation” members. Far fewer people join these churches in the US than circulate in and out of your typical Evangelical or Pentecostal megachurch on an annual basis (and I use “circulate” deliberately, for while there is a spotlight on the new arrivals, those who drop out/move/leave for the most part slip out the back door unnoticed). For some who are in such congregations, seeing an adult convert join may be something they have never seen before and may raise as many questions for them as it does for the person joining.

So the atmosphere of fellowship may be there in an evangelical or Protestant congregation, deliberately cultivated by ushers and greeters. A good friend of the present Southern Baptist Convention President even deliberately planted people in the pews to go forward at the altar call to fake baptisms to encourage others to come forward. But it’s an extremely shallow fellowship that rarely extends beyond the Sunday morning gathering.

...and what Cabinet Maker said about worshipping in liturgical setting as opposed to a songs and a service setting.
12-17-2019 12:16 PM
Cabinet Maker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
On my mind most recently has been the lack of people to talk to, at length, about spiritual matters. In other words, I would like to tell people about my stories, and hear about the stories of other catholics. I would like to see how people live out their catholic Faith, and what that looks like in their lives.

My parents generation used to invite families over for dinner with some frequency. This seems to be absent in my own (Generation X) generation. Some churches have coffee-hour after Mass, but that's not conducive to anything more than small-talk. I'm also a member of the Knights of Columbus, and they also have "fellowship" after their meetings - but again, it looks like small talk, with coffee and donuts, sandwiches, etc.

My only source, most of the time, for hearing about this kind of thing (other than this thread), is Relevant Radio. There are many shows where people call in and relate stories or ask for prayers, which sometimes gives you some insight on their own spirituality.

So I'm starting to think about starting a group like this at our parish. I'm thinking that there must be other catholics who want this kind of group the way I do. Do any of you know of anything like this? Is there some kind of discussion group like this in your diocese? Let me know. I'd like to get some ideas from someone who has already tried this. Or maybe you can offer your own ideas. Thanks!
My feeble attempt at explanation...

As a convert coming from a Protestant mindset, you're more used to fellowship than occurs through the Catholic mindset. Our focus is on the Sacrifice of the Holy Mass and the ways taught by the Church to honor God. A fair number of "requirements". Protestants have no real equivalent, so their gatherings can really only revolve around Bible Study and listening to a Pastor explain some Scripture. (And don't forget to swipe your card).
I'm a Cradle Catholic, and my exposure to the Faith was thru once a week Catechism classes (to which we were school bussed from public school to Church!), Confession and Mass. I did become an Altar Boy, but besides an occasional Retreat organized for kids, I remember very little interaction with other Catholics outside of these things. Most of my extended family were Catholic, but the overriding sense for us was we all did what was required, and little more. So growing up with that, plus going away to college (out of Mom's watchful eye) in 1970, I had no real foundational grasp on the Faith itself to combat the Collegiate Hedonism thrust upon a teenager. So thus began my 40 year lapse. Accidentally tripping over Immaculate Heart Radio while tuning my shop radio began the long process of return. Yet I KNOW it was no accident.

So all that being said, I now totally know what you're searching for and why it's hard to find. Relevant Radio is on most of the time in my shop still, and I relate to those folks better than most personally at Church. The relative anonymity of radio or the Internet allows people to open up more, plus pick specific interests, problems or debates they want to chime in on.
In a way, that's what you're trying to do...find some like minded folks who are as dedicated to the Faith as you and want to share how they found it and then live it. We're out here, but finding such locally, willing to talk face to face, is difficult.

Personally, and I haven't found a setting yet, I want to get involved with some charitable Ministry. Even during my lapsed years, I worked with Habitat for Humanity and Rebuilding Together (since I'm in the Trades), and also volunteered at a soup kitchen once a week at a Congregationalist Church. Those are the places that I found folks with more Love of Christ and were willing to actually DO what Jesus asked. In person. Not just throw money in the basket and call it good.
I know that the K of C is a great outfit (although their outfits are not ). I can't yet decide whether to commit, though. Have you built a personal relationship with any of them? Any families around your age with similar circumstances? It takes a while to build friendships, especially for those loners like me.

You'll find them. Until then, you still have our little SB family to sound off on.
12-17-2019 06:38 AM
Watchingtheweasels
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornly2 View Post
Because it was truth. How can I possibly return to faith without expressing what was truth to me at the time. I can hide how I felt, sure, but it would be a lie. I believe part of confession is to be true to that and frankly admit my sin.

I don't want to go into lots of details but in my young 20's I was bombarded with many many terrible things all at once. Most of those terrible things were related to unexpected and traumatic deaths.

My final straw, the one that shattered my faith and made me angry was the death of an infant. I was part of a crew trying to save this infant's life. We failed. The parents were present. It was horrible. Combined with all the other deaths and my experiences, I got angry. I saw no sense in it whatsoever.

Not all of us are perfect. I'm admitting a terrible shame.

Maybe someone else that lost faith and became angry at God can relate and maybe gain a little faith through positive responses and encouragement. I'm gonna guess I'm not alone.

All I know is that it's impossible for me to convey where I stand without being truthful to myself and those that I'm seeking guidance from. Be it priests, laity, or even yourself. Anything else would be a lie.
Cornly,

I'm not Catholic but it sounds like you're in health care so I'll throw in my $0.02.

I too once coded a child... who ran behind a car that mom backed out of her garage too quickly. Late for school. Maybe hit the snooze button one too many times. Maybe the child was late getting ready. Single mom. Late for work? I don't know the prequel. All I know was the sequel that changed a mother's life forever. As did the shaken baby that ended up on a vent in the Peds ICU.

I really detest evil. I detest what it does to creation. If I was God, I would have probably evacuated all the birds, dogs, and dolphins to Mars and knocked the earth into the sun with my cosmic pool cue.

But perhaps that's the thing. Our detesting evil is sort of like the ultimate philosophical suicide bomb...for we too do evil. Perhaps not in the same way, but evil nonetheless. For I, who just got done shaking my head at the boyfriend choices of the mother of that baby above, am I above noticing that not five minutes later the pretty new nurse had her hand on my shoulder when she was telling me about a patient? As the Pogo comic strip observed, ""We have met the enemy and he is us."

...and perhaps that's why Jesus observed that the fix starts with the man in the mirror. The more we focus on our own theosis, the more faith grows. The more we focus on that broken environment we are in, the more faith dies. Perhaps that's the secret of generations of Christian ascetics, monks, and nuns who are now part of the Church Triumphant.

"And why do you look at the speck in your brother’s eye, but do not consider the plank in your own eye? 4 Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me remove the speck from your eye’; and look, a plank is in your own eye?" Matthew 7:3-4.

That plankectomy is a life long process.

I'm not sure if that's the answer you were looking for, but it's the only one I've got.
12-16-2019 03:03 PM
Atticus On my mind most recently has been the lack of people to talk to, at length, about spiritual matters. In other words, I would like to tell people about my stories, and hear about the stories of other catholics. I would like to see how people live out their catholic Faith, and what that looks like in their lives.

My parents generation used to invite families over for dinner with some frequency. This seems to be absent in my own (Generation X) generation. Some churches have coffee-hour after Mass, but that's not conducive to anything more than small-talk. I'm also a member of the Knights of Columbus, and they also have "fellowship" after their meetings - but again, it looks like small talk, with coffee and donuts, sandwiches, etc.

My only source, most of the time, for hearing about this kind of thing (other than this thread), is Relevant Radio. There are many shows where people call in and relate stories or ask for prayers, which sometimes gives you some insight on their own spirituality.

So I'm starting to think about starting a group like this at our parish. I'm thinking that there must be other catholics who want this kind of group the way I do. Do any of you know of anything like this? Is there some kind of discussion group like this in your diocese? Let me know. I'd like to get some ideas from someone who has already tried this. Or maybe you can offer your own ideas. Thanks!
11-25-2019 12:35 AM
Atticus My RCIA Experience

My wife and I, when deciding whether to join the Catholic Church, were advised by our priest to enter the RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation) program at our church. This was partly because my wife and I needed further teaching on the Faith, but also because our priest felt that people joining the Church were more likely to stay if they knew people who they went to church with. So we could look around and know people we considered friends. It was a good idea, even though, at first, I felt a little insulted to be going to a program designed for new Christians.

So we registered for RCIA and began rearranging our schedule to be able to attend. The classes were every Tuesday evening at 7:00 p.m. My wife and I had finally qualified for respite care from the state, and so we had a lady who came to hour home once each week for three hours. That was just enough time for a quick dinner and to attend our RCIA class. Usually we would eat at some fast food restaurant, and then head to the church.

When we entered the room, there were about 10 other students in the class. There was Jennifer, a kind and gentle young woman who was from New Orleans and on her second marriage. She and her husband were going through the church’s annulment process to make their current marriage valid in the Catholic Church. There was Stacy, who was a tall thin woman married to a Catholic man in the parish. She was working on joining the church after having attended services with her family for some years. Then there was William, Christian, LizBeth, and Lisa, William, Christian and Lizbeth were all cousins. Lisa was a family friend they brought along. She also was dealing with a divorce and the Church’s annulment process.

Many of the students had a person close to them who acted as their "sponsor." The women whose husbands were Catholic had obvious sponsors. A few of the others had a family friend who acted as their sponsor. But neither my wife nor I knew anyone well enough (who lived close enough) to ask them to be our sponsor. So we were able to request someone from among the teachers. I picked Steven, a deacon at our church, who was often the voice of reason whenever there was a tough question. My wife was assigned a woman from the staff. Her name was Caroline.

As the class progressed, I became restless at times. There were two women in the class as teachers, who, though I liked them both personally, were telling us things that the Church opposed as if the Church was wrong. One was that they thought women weren't priested simply due to male chauvinism. And there were other things contrary to the Faith that they expressed sometimes. I spoke out with a differing view sometimes, and mine was a lonely voice. I started to think maybe they didn't think I should pass the class. But that was probably my imagining.

The weather was getting colder, and both my wife and I started feeling we were under attack - spiritually. I started waking up every night at exactly 3 a.m, with a feeling of terror. I would then say the Lord's prayer in a whisper there in the dark, and gradually the feeling would pass.

After a couple of days of this, I looked up spiritual warfare on the internet, and discovered the St. Michael prayer.

St. Michael the Archangel,
defend us in battle.
Be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the Devil.
May God rebuke him, we humbly pray,
and do thou,
O Prince of the heavenly hosts,
by the power of God,
thrust into hell Satan,
and all the evil spirits,
who prowl about the world
seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

We found a Catholic bookstore, and bought some St. Michael prayer cards, along with a few other things. We both started to recite that prayer once each day, and the attacks stopped completely. Then the cards would mysteriously go missing, and we would return to the store to buy some more. We knew now that something was trying to prevent us from joining the Church.

As October approached, the weather got still colder. We always dressed casually for the class, and I dug out one of my favorite rugby shirts one night. It had dark green and dark blue stripes, and it was warm and comfortable, with all cotton construction.

That day, the instructors told us that sponsors had been assigned from the parish for everyone who still needed one. I lost Steven, however they introduced me to Casey that night. Casey was a big tall man with an easy smile and a friendly personality. The first thing he did was look at me and say "Hey, nice shirt!" He started pulling up the sleeve of his pullover, and lo and behold, he had on the exact same rugby shirt I was wearing!

I found out that Casey was a "cradle Catholic" and had been an altar boy when he was a kid. I was a "cradle Episcopalian" and had been an altar boy myself. So we had that in common. We also both liked traditional music and Pope Benedict. Casey sat next to me though every class from then on. He rarely spoke, but when one of the women said something wrong, he usually chimed right in and corrected her. It was a real relief. When the course was over, I received a gift from Casey. It was a book by a former Anglican priest, who converted to Catholicism after a supernatural experience with Therese of Lisieux. Casey was very devoted to the Saint himself. I gave him a collection of Christmas carols by King's College Choir, Cambridge.
11-25-2019 12:07 AM
Atticus In my family, which was Episcopalian prior to our conversion starting in 2011, it was traditional in Advent to attend a service known as "Lessons and Carols" during Advent. I'm planning a trip to a catholic Lessons and Carols service in the next few weeks so my wife and son (and maybe my inlaws) can experience this glorious tradition of sacred music, and the Liturgy of the Word. Here is a video of the Lessons and Carols service as it is done at King's College, Cambridge, England. The music arrangements were written by Sir David Wilcox. The renowned conductor of the Choir back in the 1950's. While an Anglican church - this is a very Catholic tradition, and the music is perfectly sound. Please enjoy - and if you ever have the chance - go and experience Lessons and Carols somewhere yourself.


When my son was born, we had a boombox in the delivery room. I put in a CD of King's College Choir, and the first music my son's ears heard upon birth were Christmas carols from King's College. I couldn't think of anything better.
11-24-2019 11:36 PM
Atticus Advent

Advent is the season of the Church Liturgical year which starts about now. It is the season immediately preceding Christmas - one of the greatest Feasts of the year.

Advent represents the time the world awaited in expectation the coming of the Messiah. The tradition is to make or buy an "Advent wreath" which is often a wire circlet with four candle holders spaced evenly around it. People usually decorate the wreath with evergreen branches and holly sprigs, ribbons and other decorations like pine cones, etc.

Into the candle holders go four special candles. Three are a deep purple, which is the liturgical color of the season. It represents the darkness of the world before Jesus, the Light of the world came to us. It also represents penance, and royalty. One of the candles is pink or rose colored. This candle is burned starting on "Rose Sunday" in English tradition, or for others, the Third Sunday of Advent, which is the day commemorating the birth of John the Baptist. On this day, the priests wear pink or rose colored vestments, and the readings are about John.

One candle is lit on each of the four Sundays of Advent, until at Christmas, when all four candles are burning, a white candle is often placed in the center of the wreath, representing Christ.

During Advent, we sing hymns of yearning for God, and of expectation. One of my favorites is "Come Thou Redeemer of the Earth" by Praetorius. It is also traditional to give alms, and to go to confession during Advent. Some call it a "mini-Lent."



Here's another traditional Advent "carol." It is "Oh Come oh come Emmanuel."

Advent is a season of preparation. It is one of the major effects of the liturgical year. It allows Catholics to "live" the life of Jesus in stages through the year, and to experience the full range of emotions through the cycles of waiting, expectation, joy, and sorrow, in the events of the life of Christ. Preparing for Christmas through a well-spent Advent greatly enhances the Joy and Exultation of the Christmas Feast.

Even if you don't follow catholic traditions, I invite you to listen to the hymns several times during the coming weeks, and to buy an Advent wreath, and light the candles each Sunday and every night at dinner. You will experience a sense of expectation, and a greater experience of Christmastime. God bless you!! Have a happy Advent!
11-08-2019 10:45 PM
Atticus Henrykjr, Thank you for posting. I really liked his sermon. God bless you.
11-08-2019 08:45 PM
Henrykjr
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
Henrykjr, I am a former "Anglo-Catholic" Episcopalian. I always wished for a reunification with Rome, and was dismayed as I saw the Episcopal Church step further and further away from any possibility of reunion. I was DELIGHTED when I heard of the Anglican Ordinariate. It was the perfect way to preserve the rich patrimony of the English church, with it's spirituality, customs and culture. I came into the Roman Catholic Church during the reign of Benedict XVI, and was thrilled when he made his state visit to Britain. Unfortunately, there is no Anglican Orinariate parish close to me. I would be there in a heartbeat, as I love the old English hymns and prayers. I'm so glad this Ordinariate exists, and it is my hope that it will reintroduce to the rest of the Church the great beauty of English sacred music and art, and help to add much needed color and reverence to the Novus Ordo Mass.
The Ordinariate is growing at a pretty good pace.

If you want to understand this....please listen to Doc Holiday's Nov 3 Sermon
here:
https://www.ordinariate.org/index.php/category/sermons/

HK
11-07-2019 07:33 AM
Trogshak
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
... There was a woman talking about her own struggles. It was in the context of prayer. She had a large family and many many problems with her kids. She said "if God is gonna give me all this, He's gonna hear about it!" So she complained to God, and I think that's okay. The point is, she was talking to God. Keeping up the relationship. Praying.
And [Jesus] told them a parable, to the effect that they ought always to pray and not lose heart. He said, "In a certain city there was a judge who neither feared God nor regarded man; and there was a widow in that city who kept coming to him and saying, `Vindicate me against my adversary.' For a while he refused; but afterward he said to himself, `Though I neither fear God nor regard man, yet because this widow bothers me, I will vindicate her, or she will wear me out by her continual coming.'"

And the Lord said, "Hear what the unrighteous judge says. And will not God vindicate his elect, who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long over them? I tell you, he will vindicate them speedily. Nevertheless, when the Son of man comes, will he find faith on earth?" (Luke 18:1-8)
11-07-2019 01:38 AM
Cabinet Maker ^^^Well said!
11-07-2019 12:44 AM
Atticus We say in Catholicism that God is good - always. All good comes from God. I personally feel that the word "good" may have come from the word "God." Any linguists out there are free to correct me.

But not all that occurs in the tainted world is good. Part of the answer to this is that God allows free will. If this were not so, his children (us) would not have any choice in our salvation or damnation. However He gives us a choice, either to choose Him, or choose the world. But that's only part of the answer.

Bad things happen to good people all the time. Good things happen to bad people all the time. Evil exists in our world, and wreaks havoc on all creation. This also is part of the answer. When people follow God's laws, goodness flows from those decisions. Not because we have won God's favor, but because He has taught us how to live, so that we may be free, may live life abundantly, and may someday come to live in eternity with Him. When people choose evil. Evil flows from those decisions.

When a man cheats on his wife, usually divorce happens. The children are damaged by this, and may never form a loving trusting bond with a husband or wife of their own. They may fail at many things, and may turn to alcohol or drugs.

When a couple is married in Church, God is partner in their union. God strengthens them, and if they receive the gift of children, those children are raised to know God, and to know what the sacrament of marriage looks like when lived out by their parents. From this comes the desire to marry and emulate or do better than their parents, and a positive cycle can begin.

There are many other examples, and exceptions. My point is, that when we follow God's plan for us, our lives are happier doing His will. He made us for Himself, and He knows how to help us live better.

Still there is disease, deformity, and accidents. Horrible things still happen - seemingly through chance. It is this which C.S. Lewis's book "The Problem of Pain" addresses so well.

Through it all, the Church stands with us in our hour of great need, and comforts us. Suffering is one of the great mysteries of the Faith, and can be redemptive in itself.

Listen to this woman at the :39 minute mark for an education on suffering as a devout catholic: https://relevantradio.com/2018/08/go...ugust-31-2018/

I'll say one more thing tonight. I watched a film a few years ago - don't remember the title. There was a woman talking about her own struggles. It was in the context of prayer. She had a large family and many many problems with her kids. She said "if God is gonna give me all this, He's gonna hear about it!" So she complained to God, and I think that's okay. The point is, she was talking to God. Keeping up the relationship. Praying.

God bless you!
11-06-2019 07:45 PM
Bluesman60 Many families and individuals experience tragedy but some seem to be immune. Nothing worse than the death of young people or watching a loved one slowly die to an illness. These type of occurrences can make us angry at God but that anger will hurt us more in the long run and the open wound makes us susceptible to the evil one...
I try to keep life and its sufferings in perspective and say Thy will be Done and I am consoled by thinking about Heaven and reuniting with my loved ones.
11-06-2019 07:32 PM
Cornly2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyzer Soze View Post
Why would a Catholic or any Christian publicly state he is angry at God?
Because it was truth. How can I possibly return to faith without expressing what was truth to me at the time. I can hide how I felt, sure, but it would be a lie. I believe part of confession is to be true to that and frankly admit my sin.

I don't want to go into lots of details but in my young 20's I was bombarded with many many terrible things all at once. Most of those terrible things were related to unexpected and traumatic deaths.

My final straw, the one that shattered my faith and made me angry was the death of an infant. I was part of a crew trying to save this infant's life. We failed. The parents were present. It was horrible. Combined with all the other deaths and my experiences, I got angry. I saw no sense in it whatsoever.

Not all of us are perfect. I'm admitting a terrible shame.

Maybe someone else that lost faith and became angry at God can relate and maybe gain a little faith through positive responses and encouragement. I'm gonna guess I'm not alone.

All I know is that it's impossible for me to convey where I stand without being truthful to myself and those that I'm seeking guidance from. Be it priests, laity, or even yourself. Anything else would be a lie.
11-06-2019 07:14 PM
Keyzer Soze
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticus View Post
PeterEnergy, you are not a Catholic. In fact you're not a Christian. You do not believe in the Trinity. Do not post in this thread again. You have been warned. I will not say what I think about Sylvia Browne - but I do not believe much of anything she says, and neither should catholics.
Why would a Catholic or any Christian publicly state he is angry at God?
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