Survivalist Forum - Reply to Topic
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Thread: Lessons Learned From Bug Out Bag Testing Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
08-05-2016 03:51 PM
dompamar I went out last week. We live on a small farm. I carried my rifle around for a bit and very quickly realized how uncomfortable it is. I definitely need a sling. I also realized that you can only carry so many items in your pants pockets, so I think a utility belt/fanny pack could come in handy.

Great replies so far!
07-29-2016 03:03 PM
NCalHippie
Quote:
Originally Posted by preperguy View Post
I got rid of the inflatable things. Trust me if you sleep in the ground you will wish you had something between you and the ground. But a person can get used to it. If we're talking gray, a roll won't make any difference. That's just me.

If I can go on a two week hike and be comfortable, eat, drink, stay dry, that is perfect for a BOB. Just add a weapon. If a person wants to test a BOB there is no better way than a hike. Even a two day hike works. Do a few in different seasons. Or as long as it would take to get home from work or to your BOB location.

I'd really like to add a hammock and ditch the ground/tent sleeping.
That is what I decided and I carry a hammock, bivy bag and tarp/tent in my 8 pound survival bag. I have set everything up and tried it, but haven't tested it overnight as of yet.
07-29-2016 12:40 AM
preperguy I got rid of the inflatable things. Trust me if you sleep in the ground you will wish you had something between you and the ground. But a person can get used to it. If we're talking gray, a roll won't make any difference. That's just me.

If I can go on a two week hike and be comfortable, eat, drink, stay dry, that is perfect for a BOB. Just add a weapon. If a person wants to test a BOB there is no better way than a hike. Even a two day hike works. Do a few in different seasons. Or as long as it would take to get home from work or to your BOB location.

I'd really like to add a hammock and ditch the ground/tent sleeping.
07-28-2016 05:25 PM
thataway
Quote:
Originally Posted by preperguy View Post
Last time I hiked I learned I needed more water. I found out inflatable pads and pillows are uncomfortable. I prefer a roll up pad. I didn't take one because I couldn't tie both a bag and a pad to my pack. I need a better pack. My sleeping bag fell off and down a small cliff. Luckily I was able to go down and get it. Need a better way to tie it down. I need more water.
Each of us has our own priorities, but some seem to be more like back packing than BOB type of gear. For example, my "sleep" system, is a light tarp(poncho), SOL Bivy sack+fleece. Minimal clothing--essentials for fire/water, defense. Also multi tasking like a poncho--which gives warmth, rain protection, ground cloth/shade etc is more practical than purposed items.

But sleeping bags, roll up/inflatable pads/pillows are not in what I would consider for a BOB. The lighter the better! The more mobile the better. The more you blend in (Gray man) the better...High energy food/water are going to be essential. In many cases, movement at night may be better, and rest during the day.
07-28-2016 01:46 AM
preperguy Last time I hiked I learned I needed more water. I found out inflatable pads and pillows are uncomfortable. I prefer a roll up pad. I didn't take one because I couldn't tie both a bag and a pad to my pack. I need a better pack. My sleeping bag fell off and down a small cliff. Luckily I was able to go down and get it. Need a better way to tie it down. I need more water.
07-27-2016 07:43 AM
Johnnny13 I've found that a small amount of the basics are what works. If your moving in your car then you can carry as much as you want. If your moving by foot then 30 pounds would usually be the max. It's about survival and defense. Everything else can be found.
07-26-2016 07:53 PM
jayclimber
Quote:
Originally Posted by dompamar View Post
Hello everyone!

How many of you have actually done a field test with your bug out gear? I have to admit, that I have not tested my actual BOB and its contents overnight. I have gone on some backpacking trips and have used a lot of my gear that is currently in my BOB...But I have not done a dedicated BOB Field Test.

I've seen a lot of people talk about testing and recommend it. But I haven't seen a dedicated thread that for people to post what they learned. So I thought I'd start this thread so that people with be encouraged to do some testing and then share what their results.

I think it will be good for many of us to hear some real stories from people who have actually gone out and tested their BOBs.

What items worked?
What items were dead weight?
Did you really need 13 knives? ;p
Did you carry your BOB AND a Rifle?
What challenges did you face?
Was your bag too heavy?
Was it lighter than you thought and could you add more items?
Were you not in as good of shape as you thought?
Is one type/brand of item better than another?
What items are overlooked?
Should you have brought water instead of soda? ;p

etc...etc...

What are some lessons learned?

PS: sorry if a thread like this already exists...I did a few searches and didn't see any.

Thanks
Actually think these are great questions! It is said fairly often on this forum to train with your gear! Know its pros and cons and how it works. Does your load out work for your AO? What time of year is it? Where you physically able to carry it? Work with it? All this needs to be worked out!

Luckily, I've grown up in the outdoors climbing, backpacking, skiing, scouting and being an Army "Brat" didn't hurt either! So being comfortable living and surviving in the outdoors isn't an issue... But, putting all that experience together with dedicated gear for 3-season use and winter use all packaged and ready to go was a little different. Add weapons and ammo to the mix and then the thoughts of concealment and E&E tactics not to mention navigating to a predetermined BOL with all the above, whew, its a lot to seriously consider...

I bought 2 separate BOB (one packed for spring, summer, and fall and the other for strictly winter) and have tested both! I have walked/hiked to our BOL in summer and am planning on the same this winter! Here is a little of what I learned to help answer your specific questions!

-What items worked?
***quick dry, durable clothing. Lightweight, quick dry, and small packing. I had quick dry hiking pants and long sleeve button up quick dry shirt on with a spare set in my bag. Will keep the bugs off of you and dry quick after river/creek crossings! 2 changes of quick dry underwear, 2 prs wool socks, LW microfleece pullover and rain gear. plus a LW pair of gloves and a wide brimmed hat. Along with approach hiking shoes on my feet!
-What items were dead weight?
***Personally, my only real dead weight would have been a 5x8 piece of camo netting that I packed in case I needed to conceal my self and location while en route to my BOL. I didn't use it but will still pack it anyways! I also carried too much water, especially since the bulk of my route follows a river valley...
-Did you really need 13 knives? ;p
***I packed a leatherman tool, a folder, and a small fixed blade!
-Did you carry your BOB AND a Rifle?
*** I did! Ohio is an open carry state and I checked with a friend of mine on the local PD (he also happens to be prepping) he didn't see any issues although he did give me a few things to be careful about. I kept my rifle unloaded but I do have my CCW so my pistol was carried as usual! Carrying a rifle over several miles was different and I used a 2 point sling that enabled me to keep my hands free with it across my chest or at times I did strap it to the outside of my pack in a scabbard...
-What challenges did you face?
***I have experience with maps and cross country navigation, but the obstacles such as an unexpected river crossing and traffic posed a dilemma. Also the unexpected dog barking made me a bit skittish of being seen and causing alarm.
-Was your bag too heavy?
***My bag weighed just under 30 lbs... But with a plate carrier (15 lbs) and belt (8 lbs) and rifle (6.5 lbs) my load came in under 60 lbs... Now being an avid backpacker and mountaineer, this was no surprise to me and I was relatively comfortable moving with the load.
-Was it lighter than you thought and could you add more items?
***No and I really wouldn't want to add more...
-Were you not in as good of shape as you thought?
***Thank goodness I am in relatively good shape (I run, do light weight training, and circuit train) and train with my load and gear, along with backpacking and climbing trips throughout the year I was OK...
-Is one type/brand of item better than another?
***I do pay attention to quality with the bulk of my gear and it does pay get better stuff, I have my favorites but, my equipment is a good mix of everything!
-What items are overlooked?
***I think a lot of folks overlook 1st aid, navigation, preplanning, gear repair kit, gun cleaning kit, and proper clothing and never taking the time to learn it and train with it before hand....
-Should you have brought water instead of soda? ;p
***Water!!!!

etc...etc...

-What are some lessons learned?
***I would say that it took me 2 times as long to get to my BOL than I had planned... I was constantly looking over my shoulders and felt like my head was on a swivel. Every noise made me pause, and my senses were overloaded at times... Getting from my house to the town limits took really long. tried to be slow and quiet and not disturb anyone or anything and stay off the major streets and roads. I ended up dropping into the river valley sooner than I thought to just bypass people... I was uncomfortable on the street. I stayed in contact with my wife via cell phone just to check in and also texted my Police friend a few times to check in with him. He actually met up with me at one point to just see how it was doing! My BOL is my grandmas farm which has a pond, a well, a small creek, and partially wooded. I camped in her woods that night and my wife picked me up the next morning. My shelter was a 5x8 SOL tarp and I used a fleece blanket for a sleeping bag. I normally do a tent and down bag but figured the tarp was worth trying out, wasn't that bad, I'll stick with it for my BOB...

Anyways, it was a great test and learning experience. I hope more people try it and fully test their gear!

Hope this helped!
07-26-2016 03:14 PM
NCalHippie
Quote:
Originally Posted by drray777 View Post
I have tried various methods and using Vaseline and cotton is the easiest way to start a fire with flint or mag fire starters. They take up little space and work like the bomb. I have put together a small fire starter kit that I keep in my knife sheath that includes these. I am sure you may be aware of these but this will make the difference in a fire within seconds vs. struggle, so I thought I would mention it.
I make cotton balls with Vaseline on one side and wax on the other. Easy to start, but last longer. Dip the cotton ball in the wax about halfway, let cool and smear the other side with Vaseline, I carry a couple in my EDC FAK on my person at all times (anytime I am dressed).
07-26-2016 02:53 PM
America's Patriot I've learned that I can't hump dozens of miles with the same heavy pack that I could when I was 20... take the bare necessities.
07-26-2016 02:30 PM
GVC86
Quote:
Originally Posted by drray777 View Post
I would love to have a game cart, but they are not available over here in South Africa as far as I could find. I would most likely pull it if I had a hill and have been considering developing a harness, but again, it is hard to find things over here. I would like to find a M.U.L.E. and I believe there is one fellow over here who is currently making something like it available.
D.I.Y. Doc.

As we say in South africa, "n boer maak n plan" where there is a will there is a way...

Sent from my E2303 using Tapatalk
07-26-2016 06:02 AM
drray777
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataway View Post
I am trying to visualize pushing or pulling a 240 L wheeled trash bin. This is what we have at our home for both re-cyclables, and trash. I have a tough enough time pushing then 75 feet to the street, especially thru the grass, if loaded--let alone along some trail. All of one's preps depend on their circumstances and routes. Are there large pneumatic tires? I agree with Jerry Young that a game cart would be a good platform if you needed heavy weights. I do love the cart idea, but it seems to me that a single wheel cart would be easier to handle on a trail, than a double or triple wheel cart???

I have not tried using just what is in our BOB currently--but I have done a lot of backpacking, and know that all items carry will work and have been individually tested. One advantage is that I started the outdoor adventures in the 1940's, so the gear improvement is offset by my being elderly, but not one would would ever give up! Our bags are about 30#,without water. But we live in area where there is an abundant water supply (with filtering and disinfection). We each have a 3 Liter bladder for our packs. But that does add 6.6 lbs to each pack for full water bladders.

I have mulled over the weapons. A min would be two 9mm semi auto-one for each of us with at least 100 rounds each. If I could carry openly long guns, then I would carry AR 15 variant, and the wife the Ruger 10/22 takedown, or 12 gauge pump action Mossberg. However, if we had to conceal, then one of my packs will easily carry the 10/22 takedown. For us, having to engage any human threat at a significant range, is very low the the list of scenarios. The 10/22 with 100 rounds in magazines, adds about 7 lbs. If we took a basic AR 15 with 3-30 loaded magazines, that would be closer to 9 lbs.

So each bag could potentially could weight 45 lbs (with water/guns/ammo)--and that is too much for our age. cut down--to one fixed blade (K-Bar) for me, and Buck 110 for my wife. Still keep one light weight Leatherman, I still need to cull down...

Thanks for the topic
I would love to have a game cart, but they are not available over here in South Africa as far as I could find. I would most likely pull it if I had a hill and have been considering developing a harness, but again, it is hard to find things over here. I would like to find a M.U.L.E. and I believe there is one fellow over here who is currently making something like it available.
07-26-2016 01:45 AM
thataway
Quote:
Originally Posted by drray777 View Post
I have practiced camping and hiking with with some of my gear. I found that theory and practice have a wide disparity. That is why I have various options to bug out. Hopefully one of them will work, but if going on foot, I have a 240L wheeled trash bin with a flip lid to carry my bag in. It will keep things dry and allow me to carry more weight for a longer distance than with a pack. My wife has a 140L bin.
I am trying to visualize pushing or pulling a 240 L wheeled trash bin. This is what we have at our home for both re-cyclables, and trash. I have a tough enough time pushing then 75 feet to the street, especially thru the grass, if loaded--let alone along some trail. All of one's preps depend on their circumstances and routes. Are there large pneumatic tires? I agree with Jerry Young that a game cart would be a good platform if you needed heavy weights. I do love the cart idea, but it seems to me that a single wheel cart would be easier to handle on a trail, than a double or triple wheel cart???

I have not tried using just what is in our BOB currently--but I have done a lot of backpacking, and know that all items carry will work and have been individually tested. One advantage is that I started the outdoor adventures in the 1940's, so the gear improvement is offset by my being elderly, but not one would would ever give up! Our bags are about 30#,without water. But we live in area where there is an abundant water supply (with filtering and disinfection). We each have a 3 Liter bladder for our packs. But that does add 6.6 lbs to each pack for full water bladders.

I have mulled over the weapons. A min would be two 9mm semi auto-one for each of us with at least 100 rounds each. If I could carry openly long guns, then I would carry AR 15 variant, and the wife the Ruger 10/22 takedown, or 12 gauge pump action Mossberg. However, if we had to conceal, then one of my packs will easily carry the 10/22 takedown. For us, having to engage any human threat at a significant range, is very low the the list of scenarios. The 10/22 with 100 rounds in magazines, adds about 7 lbs. If we took a basic AR 15 with 3-30 loaded magazines, that would be closer to 9 lbs.

So each bag could potentially could weight 45 lbs (with water/guns/ammo)--and that is too much for our age. cut down--to one fixed blade (K-Bar) for me, and Buck 110 for my wife. Still keep one light weight Leatherman, I still need to cull down...

Thanks for the topic
07-25-2016 11:14 PM
iyaayas One obstacle I discovered was new gear for fiance and daughter. Things like new footwear that hasn't been properly broken in and two people completely unaccustomed to wearing even light packs for any length of time. It's not so hard to break in new boots but the training they both went through to get familiar with carrying packs and weapons.......still an ongoing process after three years.

Progress is being made but I can't bring myself to subject either of them to how I was raised and the training and experience I have from military service. I never realized how difficult it can be for people to move over what I consider mild terrain when they simply aren't used to the weight of a pack. And how awkward it can be to carry a rifle or shotgun comfortably. All things I sort of took for granted until I started prepping and running emergency drills with the family.

Don't ever assume a thing. Not even for yourself. Try out your gear, all your gear and get comfortable wearing and using it. That goes for family members as well.

Word of advice on packs. If you've never humped a pack, or your trying help outfit a family member that's never done it.......whatever you or they think they can comfortably carry while hiking....cut it in half and start there. It is a real morale destroyer to get a newbie out in the field with way more then they can carry. They will struggle and possible injure themselves which may cause them to lose interest in doing any of it. Set them up for success and go light at first. Work your way up and always double check their gear. This means pack contents,how it's loaded, what they are wearing including footgear. Keep an eye on them as you hike and pay attention to signs of fatigue. Take appropriate breaks and remember water and rations have to be part of the load. Water especially. Make sure they hydrate.

Look for signs of chafing around pack straps. Check for blisters. Treat these immediately as they will only get worse as the day goes on. And believe me, blisters on folks not used to hiking can end a trip.

Last piece of advice: when working with wives, children, or other family members keep the training as fun as is possible. Be creative but if you want folks New to it to keep at it, making the training fun is a sure fire way to keep them coming back. Drill instructor approaches and forced marches don't work on the ladies, or children. Or even some men, for that matter.
07-25-2016 10:49 PM
jonnydingo Some sound advice for sure, the one common thing I am hearing is what took me two years to figure out.
To much weight will kill you. I am constantly tweaking my kits for weight vs function and reliability.

With a family you can leverage supplies. Know your limitations.

So many people here crap on expensive gear, but as I evolve I have learned that shaving pound matters, and yes some of the titanium gear and high tech fabrics are grossly overpriced, but my family is worth it.

How much do you spend per month on movies, booze, etc. If you want it and care about it you find a way, it may take some time, but we can all afford it given enough time.

And a Big 1+ for the guy who said 13 knives is to many. Give me a break these are the guys who are armed to the teeth but don't have enough food to last two days (yea I will die before I eat warm tunafish) LOL. (5 ounce of tuna is about 160 calories) For five ounces I can eat something that is tasty and quadruple the calories (and my family eats everything that we have in the kits, boy that has changed over the years).

You cannot drastically change your diet or you will get sick.

Don't get me wrong I am a knife guy and a gear junkie and spend a lot more than I should on those hobbies, but the weight abuse of some of these kits is hilarious.

My kits are no exception. I think that they are all to heavy so I trim and try to whittle away more and more.

Practice with your food, and supplies. I still fail on some our family drills , we can do nothing but work on it to become better, and pray that we never need all this cool crap...
07-25-2016 12:20 PM
dompamar Lots of great replies! Thanks, everyone!
07-17-2016 08:47 AM
atomic17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cephalotus View Post
Well done. How did that night vision system worked out?

Just a comment from a daily bike commuter: Worst case for riding a bike is not a cold day but a rain storm. No matter what you do, you will be soaking wet after a short time. It's much(!) worse than hiking in a rain storm (and this isn't fun either)

If you ride bikes with your family what about using electric assisted bikes at least for those with less leg power? 65 miles is quite doable...
Ive found good gear helps make riding in the rain more tolerable. Its still no fun, but a good under armor top and bottom mean at least you arent cold and miserable, just wet and miserable.
07-17-2016 02:03 AM
Old fart
Quote:
Originally Posted by kfilly View Post
Oh, I forgot to add a few things. Trekking poles are very underrated when hiking with a loaded pack. I am sold on them. I have not hiked with my rifle due to hiking in a fairly busy public park. That would be frowned upon. However, I have added additional weight to my pack to simulate the rifle weight that would be strapped to the pack.
You may not want your rifle on your pack where it might be easy to steal, attract unwanted attention, and/or impossible to employ immediately if you need it.

The alternative is carrying it in your hands, preferably with a tactical sling of some sort. Movement with a rifle in your hands is very different than with it on your pack. Try standing in your house (with the curtains closed) with your rifle in your hands. Walk around with your rifle still in your hands. How often are you having to adjust your grip? How long does it take before your hands get tired and you wouldn't be able to hang onto it if someone tried to take it? What about your wider profile? Try it for an hour. How do your hands, fingers, arms, back, and neck feel? Don't forget to try some stairs and faster movement to see how you do. Now add your pack and repeat the exercise.

Depending on your results, you may want to modify how your rifle is packed/carried/hidden, or your sling(s). And/or make sure you have a pistol for immediate employment should the need arise. Especially since you plan on using trekking poles.

$0.02
07-17-2016 12:38 AM
Jedi Medic Learned a lot as a boy scout. Learned more when "BOBing" close to home, close to my BOV in the desert in fair weather.

you learn what's important with actual experience. water, shade, warmth at night and food. everything else is variable.

BOBing in your backyard will teach you a lot.

spent a few miserable cold nights in an otherwise warm desert because-wet clothes, not enough dry warmth to wrap up in. learned the hard way.

water is heavy. 1 canteen is not enough. you can go through 1 gallon of water just lazing around in 70 degree weather. washing your face/hands becomes unthinkable when you're packing it all on your back !

get experience, dirt time. not total immersion, not yet. just backyard it to start.
07-16-2016 03:16 AM
Writer's Block
Quote:
Originally Posted by dompamar View Post
Hello everyone!

How many of you have actually done a field test with your bug out gear? I have to admit, that I have not tested my actual BOB and its contents overnight. I have gone on some backpacking trips and have used a lot of my gear that is currently in my BOB...But I have not done a dedicated BOB Field Test.

I tend to take a slightly different approach than some people.
When I go to buy something for my preps, unless I have extensive experience with it already (or the deal is too short term to wait on), I tend to buy a single one or small assortment specifically to test.
I use the item the way I would in the field; simulating conditions in the back yard, garage, bath tub, and the like before I even think about taking it into real field conditions. I see it as my very own version of a Consumer Reports Lab. If they pass initial testing I buy more and they go into the kits.
Now, I am NOT one of those guys who tests gear to intentional destruction. I do NOT put it through stuff it will likely never experience in real, SHTF use (like some of the insane stuff people do intentionally to break things like knives on Youtube.
If they do survive the home testing, I take them out in the bush either camping or hiking and use them under real field conditions. And I do beat the heck out of them. Not all mind you. For example: knives. I do not see any reason to abuse the heck out of every knife I get just to prove they work. When I replaced almost all my fixed blades with BK-2 Campanions a while back all of them got the at home tests and new edges (just to make sure there were no factory defects) but only the first one caught the field beating to see if the make and model was worth acquiring.


I've seen a lot of people talk about testing and recommend it. But I haven't seen a dedicated thread that for people to post what they learned. So I thought I'd start this thread so that people with be encouraged to do some testing and then share what their results.

The main thing I have learned from the tests I have done is that testing is very needed for equipment you plan one day to trust your life with. I have had stuff fail under the least of stress, fail under storage conditions, found out many a great deal simply wasn't (if it's too good to be true, it probably is), and some stuff is just not worth the aggravation (high tech is not always best tech; K.I.S.S is better).

I think it will be good for many of us to hear some real stories from people who have actually gone out and tested their BOBs.

What items worked?

I am a big advocate of acquiring something that does the job NOW and upgrading as time goes on, rather than buying the bestest, most expensive of everything when you buy it and thus waiting on some stuff because of finances.

For one thing, this has taught me that some times the cheap version works just as good.

For example, I have purchased a number of different tinder products for fire starting over the years. I have found dryer lint with wood shavings made by a pocket knife works as good as anything I have bought except maybe hex tabs.


What items were dead weight?

See, here is another place I often disagree with people. Lots of people in the prep community declare "Take the BOB into the field and use it, then ditch anything you don't use". I disagree.

My thinking is the contents of a BOB are a function of your plans and skills. Depending on what you are planning for there will be more or less gear, and different types of items, than in another person's BOB.

There are tons of items in my BOB people would say no to. Thing is, I plan different than others.

For example, I tend to have AT LEAST three fire kits in all my BOBs and in different locations of the BOB. This is a direct response to the various survival courses I have been on and my diverse experiences with trying to light fire under terrible conditions, losing fire kits, and the like.


Did you really need 13 knives? ;p

The most any of my BOBs has is a multi tool, a fixed blade, and a lock blade. I am not into tons of the same item. I mean, at a certain point we are just talking about an INCH bag....

Did you carry your BOB AND a Rifle?

Here in Canada we cannot even do such a thing, so no. I have not even been hunting recently enough to have done that.

What challenges did you face?

One of the biggest in Canada relates to the previous question. Here, we have to be VERY careful carrying anything that even partially resembles a weapon and certainly cannot carry a firearm or ammunition in a BOB we take out in public.

Was your bag too heavy?

Often they start out that way and shed pounds as I upgrade gear and buy items that are more multi-purpose. This leads to reduced weight, greater functionality, and more space in pack.

Was it lighter than you thought and could you add more items?

So far, never. My lightest pack, my so called "Urban BOB" is well under weight, has loads of space left, and I still would prefer to lighten it more.
In fact, I am reworking my INCH as I discovered I cannot sit down wearing it and stand back up.


Were you not in as good of shape as you thought?

Actually, I am in exactly as bad of shape as I thought. Currently still a work in progress, but I am in fact making progress.

Is one type/brand of item better than another?

There are only two brands I really heavily "endorse":

Soldier Fuel Bars are a food bar worth every dime IMHO. Great company, great product.

SOL blankets and bivvies are AWESOME. Well made, well designed, well thought out. Well worth the money.


What items are overlooked?

Morale items are among the most important and forgotten of all.

Also, AM/FM type radios. They can provide invaluable information and such. Carry a means to increase antenna (they make antenna spools for such) and a set of headphones (for privacy and stealth).


Should you have brought water instead of soda? ;p

etc...etc...

What are some lessons learned?

PS: sorry if a thread like this already exists...I did a few searches and didn't see any.

Thanks
VERY nice to see a BOB thread not about telling others when to put in it.
07-15-2016 08:31 PM
NickB
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old fart View Post
Ditto.....
Same........
This thread has more than 20 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net