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Thread: Got a pair of new Doberman pups... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-29-2018 11:12 PM
273andme I have a blue/rust dobbie. love him, smart, protective obedient, alert. funny thing is i work night no matter when i come home day time middle of the night he wont even get out of his bed. but if anyone else he goes nuts.

Hes 12 so hes old, he plays way less and moves way slower. everyone know hes into his golden years. good thing my GF is a vet tech lol she takes good care of him and notices things i wouldnt.
11-29-2018 12:00 PM
Eddie_T There is a lot to consider with dogs and there are many who fall for the cuteness and get in over their head. My son had a neighbor with a St Bernard/Lab mix (neutered male) that he didn't keep at home. My son's wolfdog (female) had bonded with him (to watch them play was hilarious). When the neighbor moved into town the wolfdog was depressed. Knowing the dog wouldn't be kept up in town my son put in an order with animal control and within a couple of weeks he had the dog. It cost him only $5 for a rabies shot to adopt the dog.
11-28-2018 08:09 PM
Truck Vet
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
In the back of my mind I still ponder how women can be hard to get along with if not in hormonal balance, and it's hard to imagine a warrior with low testosterone. How can dogs handle it any better than humans?
When are women in hormonal balance? My first wife's time of the month was about 2 weeks. My 2nd and current wife had a hysterectomy before she met me and is a much better person. I know it proves nothing but dogs are pack animals who need a leader, and its been my experience they follow your guidance much better when they are not trying to hump your leg.


If you have a pure bred Doberman, I know of no reason why you can't keep them unaltered if you are responsible. If you want to breed them with a Black Standard Poodle, that's fine also. The most intelligent and entertaining dog I ever owned was a Doberman/Lab mix.


Over the decades, I have helped with maybe 5 litters of puppies. All my dogs are fixed because I don't ever want to do it again. But it was a experience I recommend if your fairly sure you can give them good homes.
11-27-2018 12:08 AM
Eddie_T In the back of my mind I still ponder how women can be hard to get along with if not in hormonal balance, and it's hard to imagine a warrior with low testosterone. How can dogs handle it any better than humans?
11-26-2018 06:05 PM
Truck Vet
Quote:
Originally Posted by DG23 View Post
Much respect for you and your opinion when it comes to anything 'dog related'. Have read enough of your posts to know that you are no dummy when it comes to dog care or dog training...

With that said, I got to disagree with what you said above as it pertains to females and health problems / aggression issues due to having them altered.

This study discusses the aggression issue as it relates to spay / neuter surgery: http://saveourdogs.net/wp/wp-content...er-in-dogs.pdf

A snippet from that study:


This study has to do with the long term health effects of spay / neuter surgery in dogs: http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf

A snippet:


This study is related to spayed females and longevity:
https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/100301g.aspx

A snippet from that one:



I was picking and choosing my 'snippets' to help prove my point here but... The links are good and I encourage you to at least look at them and read them for yourself.


The girls I have now are my 6th and 7th Dobermans to date. (all females) Thus far I have never been talked to by any of the various Vets we have seen over the years about getting any of them fixed. That would include the 2 different Vets that I bought Dobermans from over the years...

The reality is that there are tons of Veterinary studies that have been done that debunk (or at the bare minimum cast doubt on) the common misconceptions that you cited above.

I also believe that the spay / neuter benefit 'speech' that a lot of Vets give their customers is heavily influenced by what sort of dog they come in with and for them it has much more to do with population control than any sort of real or perceived health benefit... You go in with a Pitt or a mutt and you are likely to get the 'speech' - You go in with a purebred whatever that is not very common in your area and you are less likely to get that speech.
Other than the Problem of unwanted Puppies, here are a few reasons to spay a female...

Reduction In Cancer Prevalence
One of the biggest benefits of spaying and neutering animals is the reduction in the prevalence of specific types of cancer. Animals that are neutered experience a reduction in testicular cancer. Females that are spayed often experience a reduction in mammary tumors, uterine, ovarian and cervical tumors.
Other Beneficial Health Effects
In addition to the reduction in reproductive cancers, there are some other beneficial health effects seen in dogs that are spayed and neutered. Male dogs that are neutered also experience a reduction in non-cancerous prostate disorders, a reduction in perineal fistulas and it is also believed a reduction in risk for diabetes. Female dogs that are spayed also experience a significant reduction in pyometra, and perineal fistulas.


https://www.caninejournal.com/benefi...and-neutering/

My vet encouraged me to have my females spayed for these reasons.
Although I tend to receive compliments on my Doberman when ever I walk her, she is not without fault, and I would not breed her. If I thought she was
at the level of a Champion Dog, I probably would not have had her spayed while she was young.

I inherited a couple of English Mastiffs over 10 years ago who were not altered and they had puppies before I owned them. The female got in heat and a male dog came into the back yard and mated with our female. The puppies did not survive. It was a major hassle. I don't really know how this dog got by the male mastiff but its just another example of what can happen.

Another important thing about Dobermans, they are almost as hard to care for as Greyhounds. My German Shepherd can handle the cold or the heat but my Doberman really suffers in the cold, so we have coats for her and she mostly stays indoors in winter. Ever once in a while I see a Doberman being walked in Delaware in winter with no coat in harsh cold and I feel bad for the Dog. They are a wonderful breed but they require a better owner (in my opinion) than a German Shepherd which is a tougher and hardier dog on
average.
11-26-2018 11:04 AM
Eddie_T DG23, thanks for all your inputs. If I move forward I will weigh all characteristics carefully if I find a beautiful representation of the breed I would probably go for it even if fixed. If fixed I would use that to negotiate down any re-homing fee, so far nothing of class has appeared.
11-25-2018 11:40 PM
DG23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I was pondering the thought of a used Doberman but so many available for re-homing are fixed. I abhor the thought of a fixed Doberman, who knows what the hormonal inbalance does to a dog. Any thoughts on the subject?

If I had the time and patience to train another dog I would not turn down an otherwise healthy female Doberman that was offered to me just because she was fixed. If you have the time, space and willingness to give the girl a home I would not let the fact that she was fixed be the sole deciding factor in your decision. You could possibly be missing out on a great dog by limiting yourself like that.





I would not choose to have any of mine altered and would take a pass on buying any that had any sort of clause in their contract requiring me to have them altered. Current girls had no such clause in their contracts...

Have been seriously considering adding a poodle to the furry family here once these girls are trained a little better. Notice how puny Dystopia looks compared to these Poodles:


My girl is 75lbs in that picture...

11-25-2018 10:16 PM
DG23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Truck Vet View Post
There are plenty of poorly bred Doberman's out there. A well bred Doberman can be fixed and have no problems because of it. A poorly bred Doberman will have fewer problems after being fixed than before.

Once a Doberman gets fixed, its less likely to get into Dog fights than before.
Much respect for you and your opinion when it comes to anything 'dog related'. Have read enough of your posts to know that you are no dummy when it comes to dog care or dog training...

With that said, I got to disagree with what you said above as it pertains to females and health problems / aggression issues due to having them altered.

This study discusses the aggression issue as it relates to spay / neuter surgery: http://saveourdogs.net/wp/wp-content...er-in-dogs.pdf

A snippet from that study:
Quote:
The results of the study suggest that spayed female dogs tend to be more aggressive
toward their owners and to strangers than intact females, but that these effects of spaying
on behavior appear to be highly...
This study has to do with the long term health effects of spay / neuter surgery in dogs: http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf

A snippet:
Quote:
For female dogs, the situation is more complex. The number of health benefits associated with spaying may
exceed the associated health problems in some (not all) cases. On balance, whether spaying improves the
odds of overall good health or degrades them probably depends on the...
This study is related to spayed females and longevity:
https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/100301g.aspx

A snippet from that one:
Quote:
Researchers found that female Rottweilers have a distinct survival advantage over males—a trend also documented in humans. That advantage appears to be determined by whether the female dog is sexually intact, however. "Taking away ovaries during the first four years of life completely erased the female survival advantage," Dr. Waters said.

I was picking and choosing my 'snippets' to help prove my point here but... The links are good and I encourage you to at least look at them and read them for yourself.


The girls I have now are my 6th and 7th Dobermans to date. (all females) Thus far I have never been talked to by any of the various Vets we have seen over the years about getting any of them fixed. That would include the 2 different Vets that I bought Dobermans from over the years...

The reality is that there are tons of Veterinary studies that have been done that debunk (or at the bare minimum cast doubt on) the common misconceptions that you cited above.

I also believe that the spay / neuter benefit 'speech' that a lot of Vets give their customers is heavily influenced by what sort of dog they come in with and for them it has much more to do with population control than any sort of real or perceived health benefit... You go in with a Pitt or a mutt and you are likely to get the 'speech' - You go in with a purebred whatever that is not very common in your area and you are less likely to get that speech.
11-25-2018 05:59 PM
Truck Vet
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I raised a female Doberman decades ago and love the breed. I also raised a male wolfdog (13/16ths) which was also a wonderful animal. I want an older dog now as I don't have the energy for a puppy. I recall a beautiful red Doberman at a motel on Grand Bahama Island that just lounged around the pool and never left the property. Most of the ones I see listed for re-homing do not meet my standards as I know the breed.

I don't understand people that register a dog and then have it fixed. Though my female Doberman had a good bloodline (Sabrina Star linage) I didn't file the papers as I was not going to breed her and that's the only value of papers. Fixing is just a bit gross, I wouldn't consider it for a human being so why for a dog? I do have a male cat that was fixed and it is just fat and lazy which I would not want in a wolfdog or Doberman.
It's important to fix a Doberman because its the fastest Guard dog out there.
If he gets the scent of a Female mut in heat its hard to stop him.
As for fixing a Female, there are health reason's to think of.
There a many thousands of dogs put down every year because people didn't fix their dogs.

I bought my female Doberman from a Doberman Rescue who gave me all the paperwork to register her, which I did. I had her and the German Shepherd fixed at the same time about 3 years later. Plenty of stray Pit bulls who would have loved either one of them, and made some very ugly puppies who would have probably not found homes.

When I was a kid we had a female Collie who was not fixed. A 17 year old Chihuahua gnawed the corner of our gate off to get to her. Lucky for us she wanted no part of him.
11-25-2018 12:47 PM
Eddie_T I raised a female Doberman decades ago and love the breed. I also raised a male wolfdog (13/16ths) which was also a wonderful animal. I want an older dog now as I don't have the energy for a puppy. I recall a beautiful red Doberman at a motel on Grand Bahama Island that just lounged around the pool and never left the property. Most of the ones I see listed for re-homing do not meet my standards as I know the breed.

I don't understand people that register a dog and then have it fixed. Though my female Doberman had a good bloodline (Sabrina Star lineage) I didn't file the papers as I was not going to breed her and that's the only value of papers. Fixing is just a bit gross, I wouldn't consider it for a human being so why for a dog? I do have a male cat that was fixed and it is just fat and lazy which I would not want in a wolfdog or Doberman.
11-25-2018 09:22 AM
Truck Vet
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I was pondering the thought of a used Doberman but so many available for re-homing are fixed. I abhor the thought of a fixed Doberman, who knows what the hormonal inbalance does to a dog. Any thoughts on the subject?
There are plenty of poorly bred Doberman's out there. A well bred Doberman can be fixed and have no problems because of it. A poorly bred Doberman will have fewer problems after being fixed than before.

Once a Doberman gets fixed, its less likely to get into Dog fights than before.
I own a Female Doberman and a Female German Shepherd. The Doberman is older and the Boss until the Shepherd loses her temper on her. Dobermans don't have the fur or fat to handle a dog fight well.

This is my 3rd German Shepherd and first Doberman. This is the angriest German Shepherd I have ever had by far out of the 3. If I had to do it again I wouldn't have the 2 dogs together.

My point is, Dobermans owned by the right owner, and bought from the right breeder are a joy to behold. But they are no dog for a beginner who is not dedicated to their well being. Dobermans are better off with other Dobermans than some other breeds. YMMV
11-24-2018 10:07 PM
Eddie_T I was pondering the thought of a used Doberman but so many available for re-homing are fixed. I abhor the thought of a fixed Doberman, who knows what the hormonal inbalance does to a dog. Any thoughts on the subject?
01-15-2018 11:56 PM
DG23 Best way to help a Doberman learn how to run on slippery stuff is to give them something to chase on it...









Saw this today and laughed.




Stuff like this is why you really should NEVER get littermates. They will kill each other. This is 'common' internet knowledge and you should know this by now if you believe half the stuff you read here...



Any guesses as to which one is the more confident and dominant dog here?
12-22-2017 05:57 PM
DG23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannab1 View Post
Love that pic! As for cuteness.... Give me this tiny moment .....They will grow out of cute into regal and elegant warriors all too soon!!
Although when I got my female's ears done my neighbor said "oh that's sad, she's not cute anymore".

Dang, now I have puppy fever! How old is your big girl? Marcus will be around 10 (rescue, best guess) when I retire. Trying to put off the puppy til I have more time!
My land sharks had their first 'confirmed' kill last night.

Due to graphic nature of what happened I am not sharing pics of that.

A monstrously HUGE (very tiny) spider came out and they double teamed him. One hit it from the back while the other took the front... I had to fight them off (casually walked over and collected it before they could eat it) of the thing so I could dispose of the corpse afterwards.

They seemed pretty angry that they were deprived (went back to playing with the rope toys and balls instead) of being able to eat their first kill and put it in their tummies.



Don't wait on the puppy if you can help it. Take advantage of the things your adult can help you teach the young one... You worked hard with that training and should make efforts to pass it on.
12-20-2017 10:11 PM
dannab1 Love that pic! As for cuteness.... Give me this tiny moment .....They will grow out of cute into regal and elegant warriors all too soon!!

Although when I got my female's ears done my neighbor said "oh that's sad, she's not cute anymore".

Dang, now I have puppy fever! How old is your big girl? Marcus will be around 10 (rescue, best guess) when I retire. Trying to put off the puppy til I have more time!
12-19-2017 11:05 PM
DG23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannab1 View Post
Thanks for the pic!! They are so cute! I forget how precious they are at that age. Their ears look great! I remember the pain of posting them! Love my sweet Marcus but sure miss the ears on him.
We got a ways to go with the posting but...





My dogs are not 'cute'. (LOL!)
12-19-2017 08:13 PM
dannab1 Thanks for the pic!! They are so cute! I forget how precious they are at that age. Their ears look great! I remember the pain of posting them! Love my sweet Marcus but sure miss the ears on him.
12-18-2017 09:41 AM
Atomic Inc
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannab1 View Post
I have found the same to be true about protectiveness. My males have been more laid back, goofy and playful. They step into protectiveness when a threat is evident. My females seemed to always be watchful and alert. They were the ones who wore a path around the fence patrolling hourly. The males just watched for trouble from the deck!
Same experiences here. I've found our females to definitely be the superior protectors. Much more vigilant.

The males have always been substantially better (patient) with little kids, but we don't have that to worry about at our place anymore
12-18-2017 08:56 AM
Iamfarticus
Quote:
Originally Posted by DG23 View Post
They are killin me today.

First thing this AM (just woke up), One of the little ones decides to crap in her crate, spread it all around and eat half of it. Left a nice trail of poopie paw prints on the way outside.

While cleaning that up the other little one decides to spit up in her crate.

Not to be outdone by the little ones, Big girl then goes and spits up in her crate.

None of them are sick - They just collectively decided that the floors and crates all needed a good cleaning...

This is what a pair of young pups will do. A lot of solidarity between them, which you will see as a benefit... but not this week.
12-17-2017 12:42 PM
DG23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Truck Vet View Post
They are decent indoor dogs but have thin skin and coat so can't handle the cold very well. I buy new coats for mine every year.

.
Count me in as being one of those people that buys clothes for their dogs. LOL!

I found this place on etsy called Voyagers K9 Apparel and got some black fleece tummy warmers / coats. They love them!
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