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Thread: SHTF Food - Ramen vs. Rice vs. Corn vs. Freeze Dried Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-18-2018 10:58 PM
dmas
Quote:
Originally Posted by hunnibeez View Post
Grits, cornmeal, olive oil do not keep. I very recently had to throw away several mylar packages of grits and cornmeal. Also, a couple of bottles of olive oil and freeze dried bacon bits from Auguson Farms. All turned rancid.
How long are you talking? Degerminated cornmeal has a shelf life of 2-3 years though whole cornmeal keeps much less, in fact should be in fridge or freezer. Whole cornmeal tastes much better though i do keep jiffy around.
11-18-2018 10:42 PM
Cavalcade of Events Harmony House Foods has a lot of great dehydrated food options for long-term storage. They even are having a half off inventory sale today. Not a bad option for folks who aren't into or know how to dehydrate things they grow.
11-15-2018 01:00 PM
HarrySachs I would match that with canned fatty fish. You will need the omegas. Also id start training your body to run off fat fuel (keto) and intermittant fasting. Your calorie requirements will drop drastically and plus not to mention its way healthier .
You will still want to stock carbs (beans &rice) due to being more cost effective.
11-15-2018 05:03 AM
hunnibeez Grits, cornmeal, olive oil do not keep. I very recently had to throw away several mylar packages of grits and cornmeal. Also, a couple of bottles of olive oil and freeze dried bacon bits from Auguson Farms. All turned rancid.
11-14-2018 02:31 PM
lasers To they guy who asked about nixtamilization of corn. I do it with lime. I buy type S lime in 50 pound sacks from the hardware store for about $7 (I also use it to make white wash, lime on the garden, absorb smell if compost pile gets bad, waterproofing/fireproofing fabric and could be used to make mortar)

Very rough measurements here, but in a stainless pan I put about a gallon and a half of cold water, 3 or 4 pounds of corn and a half cup of lime. Then I very slowly heat the corn up to a very low simmer. Once it gets hot the corn should turn extremely yellow. I keep it on a very low simmer until some of the shells start to come off(if the corn is fresh this can be 20 minutes, if it is a couple years old it can be a couple hours) Once there is the first hint of the shells coming off, I take it off the heat, put a lid on it let it cool naturally. The next day I dump it into a colander and scrub the hulls off with my hands under running water.

If you don't have enough lime the corn may burst before the shells come off, Once that happens in my opinion it can only really be used for something where it is ground(tortillas or chips or thickener) or in soup.

As far as taste goes, if you ever have eaten an unsalted, unflavored corn chip the somewhat bitter aftertaste is what this tastes like. If you aren't used to it it may not be so good but I love it.
11-14-2018 10:19 AM
Attymf The survival buckets are costly compared to Ramen. That’s why I don’t have a huge supply. BJ’s or Costco sell them. I think a deluxe 30 day bucket (1850 calories a day) is $80 at BJ’s.

I like the fact that I can buy them and forget about them. No need to date, rotate stock etc.

I think buying one every few months is reasonable for most budgets. In two years a person has a 6 month supply.

FYI, I’d rather live off Kraft Mac n Cheese over Ramen.

I keep a mix of stuff. Buckets, Ramen and Mac n Cheese. Peanut Butter etc.

For long term you need variety.
11-13-2018 09:46 PM
Sailorsam m no expert but methinks the buckets are high convenience but high price?

wish I had an LDS place near me
11-13-2018 01:20 AM
Nomad, 2nd
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attymf View Post

I like to buy pre packaged 30 day supply buckets. Each one has variety, breakfast lunch and dinner with drink mixes. Easy to grab a few if bugging out via vehicle (maybe one if on foot). 25 year shelf life! Easily extend a bucket by adding rice/beans to meals.

30 day buckets is the best option. If the world is collapsing at least you can eat.
better check what your buying.
11-13-2018 12:37 AM
Attymf I like Ramen but would rather be dead in a shtf scenario than eat that for a year!

As for food bars (26-3600 cal bars) I keep those for bug out or if bug in then recon missions.

I like to buy pre packaged 30 day supply buckets. Each one has variety, breakfast lunch and dinner with drink mixes. Easy to grab a few if bugging out via vehicle (maybe one if on foot). 25 year shelf life! Easily extend a bucket by adding rice/beans to meals.

30 day buckets is the best option. If the world is collapsing at least you can eat.
11-12-2018 09:14 AM
John Galt 1 Old thread but I'll chime in.

A mixture of foods is best. Some higher quality meals to keep moral up such as Legacy and Mountain House. Some filler items like bulk pastas, and a lot of less expensive foods such as rice and corn. Be sure to stock a lot of spices.

But I disagree with only planning on 1350 calories per day. I think 2000 calories per day is a better choice. You need to be strong and active; 1350 calories per day won't do that for most people.
11-11-2018 07:22 AM
Major Mjolnir https://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/u...thout_lye.html
I haven't tried it yet.

"Hominy without Lye
Preparing Hominy — Prepare hominy in a well ventilated room. Use 2 Tablespoons of baking soda to 2 quarts of water for 1 quart of dry field corn; you can double the recipe if your stainless steel pot is large enough. Add the baking soda to the water; bring to a boil while stirring to dissolve the baking soda. Then add the dry field corn, stirring continuously to prevent sticking. Boil vigorously for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then allow to stand for 20 minutes. Rinse off the baking soda solution with several changes of hot water. Follow with cold water rinses to cool for handling. It is very important to rinse the corn thoroughly.

Work hominy with hands under running water until the dark tips of kernels are loosened from the rest of the kernel. (When working the hulls to remove the dark tips, do so under running water in a colander so the shelled kernels have little contact with the remaining unshelled corn with hulls that still have baking soda solution on them.) Separate the tips from the corn by placing the corn in a coarse sieve and rinsing thoroughly.

Hot Pack—Add sufficient water to cover the hominy by about 1 inch. Boil 5 minutes and change the water. Repeat this process with clean water each time for 4 more times. In fresh water again, cook the rinsed kernels until the kernels are soft (30 to 45 minutes) and drain. ..."
11-10-2018 06:04 PM
Sailorsam
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
You can use a number of different alkalies to nixtamalize, even lye. But the process is a little different for each one. For example, the lye process which is how I originally learned, takes a LOT of boiling and rinsing to make it edible. I haven't tried using baking soda, but it seems it would take a long longer to convert the corn since it's a fairly mild alkali.
so you've nixtamilized yourself? care to post / thread about it? would like to try myself.
maybe I should start a thread asking about.
11-10-2018 04:45 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailorsam View Post
old thread

most on this site do NOT advocate ramen for long-term storage.

if one is planning on long-term non-processed corn, consider nixtamalization
this will make the corn easier to digest and improve the nutrition.

most of the corn-based food we see (tortillas, corn meal, grits) has gone through this.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

(edit; internet says one can use baking soda to nixtamilize. anyone heard of?)

bulk corn can be ridiculously cheap and available (watch for chemically treated for bugs etc), stores easy, and can be ground at home.
You can use a number of different alkalies to nixtamalize, even lye. But the process is a little different for each one. For example, the lye process which is how I originally learned, takes a LOT of boiling and rinsing to make it edible. I haven't tried using baking soda, but it seems it would take a long longer to convert the corn since it's a fairly mild alkali.
11-10-2018 02:53 PM
Sailorsam old thread

most on this site do NOT advocate ramen for long-term storage.

if one is planning on long-term non-processed corn, consider nixtamalization
this will make the corn easier to digest and improve the nutrition.

most of the corn-based food we see (tortillas, corn meal, grits) has gone through this.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

(edit; internet says one can use baking soda to nixtamilize. anyone heard of?)

bulk corn can be ridiculously cheap and available (watch for chemically treated for bugs etc), stores easy, and can be ground at home.
02-16-2010 10:29 PM
Sky1950 I alter between long grain rice and a smaller amounts of potato flakes for diversity as the two main staples. I also add vaccum packs of lima beans, black eyes, red beans, etc... I also add packets of powdered McCormick brown, onion or cream gravies to moisten it all up... if mix a pile of rice with gravy and beans, it will fill you up fine....add the nutrition pills and you can make it a long long time... I vacuum seal all of it in 1 week allocations .....

all you need is good clean water and a method of boiling... my two cents anyway.... good luck
02-16-2010 09:43 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indiana_Geoff View Post
The US elcheapo ramen noodles always make me feel like crud. Go to a Chinese/japanese market. They don't cost a lot more and they are a LOT better.
They cost quite a bit more in my area. I can buy a case of the cheapo kind for what 2 packs of the good stuff costs. Even at that, I won't buy the cheapo stuff because it tastes like a salt lick to me. The real asian ramen is very good and the variety is amazing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rifleman87 View Post
I too just brought a few #10 cans of hash browns from Emergency Esstentials for $5.99( http://beprepared.com/Default.asp?bhcd2=1266271253 ).
I like the dehydrated hashbrowns so much that I buy the bulk bag now and repackage them into buckets. Dang good eatin'! Supposedly Costco sells them in large boxes too, but my local one doesn't stock them.
02-15-2010 05:10 PM
Indiana_Geoff The US elcheapo ramen noodles always make me feel like crud. Go to a Chinese/japanese market. They don't cost a lot more and they are a LOT better.
02-15-2010 05:06 PM
rifleman87
Ramen noodles

I just tried Ramen noodles for the first time last weekend, after I finished eating them I thought they were not too bad, I will take them on a camping trip. Then within 3 minutes after finishing I vomited them, I could not eat anything for about 4 hours after that. I am not sure if I just got a bad bag or if I am alergic to something in them, anyway I will not buy them again.

I too just brought a few #10 cans of hash browns from Emergency Esstentials for $5.99( http://beprepared.com/Default.asp?bhcd2=1266271253 ).
02-15-2010 01:06 AM
Cryptkeeper
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyMac View Post
I've recently become interested in survival (beyond guns & ammo) and have been doing some research into food/water solutions.
After some research here are three of my strategies for having enough food & water to last my family around 12 months.
Keep in mind I am not very well off and plan on adding to my SHTF storage a little at a time with my weekly grocery trips.
Do any seem viable for short and intermediate term SHTF situations? Are my assumptions valid? Suggestions?

Assumptions:
Minimum 1300-1500 calories & 50g-70g protien per day along with all the necessary nutrients.

Ramen: 380 calories per pkg would require about 4 pkgs per day providing ~1500 calories and 40g protein.
Obviously sodium is 2 times too high but that is optional as the msg and salt is contained in the packets.
I have a gut instinct that surviving on ramen might give me cancer or some terrible disease.
Pros: At $0.15/pkg Ramen would cost about $4/week to survive or about $200 for a 1yr supply per person.
Cons: Ramen provides nearly no nutrient content. Nutrient supplementation is required. Only ~3yr shelf life.

Enriched Long Grain Rice: 2 cups (dry) provide almost 1300 calories and 24g of protien as well as a couple of useful nutrients.
Many eastern nations use rice as a staple... I'm confident that with nutrient supplementation this plan is viable.
Pros: Buying in bulk would cost about $5/wk to survive or about $260 for a 1yr supply. I assume shelf life is long.
Cons: Nutrient supplementation is required. Requires water and decent amount of preparation.

Corn (grits/cornmeal/maize...): 2.25 cups (dry) provide about 1350 calories and 38g of protien as well as a few useful nutrients.
Very similar to rice for all practicle purposes. Shelf life might be less, but it's also packaged in cardboard from the store.
Pros: Cost would be about $6/wk to survive or about $310 for a 1yr supply per person. I assume shelf life can be improved.
Cons: Nutrient supplementation is required. Requires water and decent amount of preparation.

Freeze Dired Prepared Meals: Stores like Costco provide prepackaged freeze dried meals enough for a 1yr supply.
Basically, it's real food except freeze dried. Lots of variety, lots of nutrition... as close to regular eating when SHTF as it gets.
Pros: Excellent nutrition & variety, 25yr shelf life, very little prep time/effort to reconstitute.
Cons: Cost about $1000/yr per person but easily the best value. Takes up a lot of physical space.

Nutrients: Bottled vitamins generally have 100% of daily nutrients required plus they only cost $20/yr/person in bulk.
Despite the chosen plan, nutrient supplementation via vitamins will be utilized - it is too cheap given the benefits to overlook.
I figure I will just crush them up and add them to meals to aid absorption. Do vitamins have lengthy shelf lives?

I have not thought of a solution for water.
If SHTF tomorrow, aside from freezing to death, I guess I'd rig up some sort of cisturn with my downspouts and boil the water.
Maybe run the water through a crude particulate filter to get out the bigger stuff.
I have a whole-house water filter/softener... but it's computerized and requires water pressure to operate.


this is more of teaching you how to make up 1yrs worth of food but its also a great and cheap way to make MRE's







just look up homemade MRE's on youtube there are several

the best thing to do is stockup on what you eat and eat what to stock up on is isnt goign to do you any good if you buy $500 worth of spam and you dont really like spam. get what you and your family will eat. and DO NOT TELL ANYONE your stocking up ,not even your best friends.

vitamins once you open the bottle the vitamins start to lose their potency. so get vitamins in small bottles like no bigger than around 100-150 count (3 bottles will be over a 1 yrs supply)
02-15-2010 12:51 AM
lanahi
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roguetoad View Post
I store rice/beans/pasta for extended periods, and MH for camping. MH is just to expensive for long term storage.
Most could probably afford a can of MH every few months. There are a couple of foods that are good to have, such as powdered butter, powdered sour cream, or powdered eggs, that can be used for baking or other ways. If you don't have a goat and chickens, it's kind of hard to keep these around any other way.
I don't think their prepared meals are worth it, but single food in FD or dehydrated surely can be, and when you consider their price per serving, it is very reasonable and even cheap. In many cases, if you figure the cost per serving of dehydrated versus grocery can, the MH will be less expensive and take up less room in storage.
I have #10 cans of different kind of vegetables and a few FD meats so that I can make a variety of dishes from them, stews and casseroles, and every other way you usually use them.
Once they are opened, if kept free of moisture, most dehyrated or FD foods will last over a year without spoiling, so it is easy to mix ingredients together from opened cans to give much variety, and the taste is often better than grocery store cans.
Do a cost comparison per serving and see what you come up with.
One other thing I like about FD or dehydrated #10 cans is that we might not have refrigeration available in certain scenarios and by using only what you need at the time from the #10 cans, you can always have fresh foods instead of the problem of food spoiling if you only want a little of it instead of a whole can of something.
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