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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-18-2020 09:46 AM
Major Mjolnir PawPaw for breakfast desert. My try at saving seed last year failed (mold) probably kept them too wet. Try again this year.
04-06-2020 08:06 AM
nicktide
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Diehl View Post
I was walking around the woods behind my house and discovered that I have a Paw Paw patch (30 yards behind my house). The trees are still little but they are growing fruit and I am looking forward to eating them. (for those that don't know what a Paw Paw is: http://www.blossomnursery.com/pawpaw_TREE_&_FRUIT.html)

I am going to take my loppers out later today and clear around all of them and start to make them the dominant tree so they will flourish.

Also, last Sunday I went hiking on timberland behind my house and found another patch. So, I will have that patch to pick too.

I have found Huckleberries, Blackberries, Beauty Berries, Hickory's (some I plan to graft with Pecans), Sassafras, Wax Myrtle, Muscadines, a smaller wild grape, Sparkleberries and now Paw Paws on my property.

Of course, I also have plenty of Oaks for acorns to use as a food source too.

Add to that any gardening and fruit bearing trees that I plant and I should have quite a bounty. I have planted (so far) 2 Pear trees, 3 Lemon trees, and 1 Mandarin Orange tree. I am slowly getting me a good variety as time and money allows.


Al
I keep mental and written notes of any wild or untapped (ie pear trees on school property) food sources. I know of two stands of Paw paws near me.

Do your research before clearing the brush. I think remember reading somewhere they donít like it too clear.... this is why they are not grown commercially.
04-06-2020 07:54 AM
blackriver My pawpaws in southern Ontario have taken about 6 years since planting to produce fruit reliably.

Then I read all the accounts about pawpaw consumption and early onset Parkinson's.... anybody have any commentary on the relationship between pawpaw consumption and Parkinson's?

Here's one of several links:

https://growingfruit.org/t/the-dange...sumption/16536
04-05-2020 12:17 PM
abo4ster What a great tree!

In addition to edible fruit, you can pretty much guarantee when it flowers in spring that the turkeys will start gobbling, not a bad thing to know if you are a turkey hunter.

Also makes a decent natural insect repellent. I just crush a couple leaves and rub my exposed skin. If you decide to try that, suggest you test a small spot first before going crazy like I do which does include me rubbing it all over my face, neck, arms and legs. I haven't felt the need yet to this myself, but one of my friends swears it works to ward off chiggers too if you lay the leaves on top of your bedding if you are using natural materials in the warm season.

FYI, the bark contains the natural insect repellent known as acetogenins too.
04-03-2020 04:38 AM
Major Mjolnir I have 3 in flower this year in my small 'grove' right next to my house. The two from which I got their first fruit last year and one that I mentioned in post #30 that had the grafted, 'named' variety die and had re-sprouted from the root stock. I hope to try some hand pollination this year.
04-03-2020 12:28 AM
Hick Industries Just planted a couple pawpaws last month.
They are in between a couple oaks trees, so they will get 4-5 hrs of morning sun, and are protected from the south west winds by a building.
04-02-2020 07:49 PM
barnetmill I have paw paws that I planted and some are starting to flower. I doubt there will be fruit this year, I am hoping for next year. They need partial shade when young and can take more sunlight as they mature. There are some that said to do well in sun and others claim full sun will eventually even kill adults. Paw paws well spread out through the eastern USA and even some do cross the mississippi river. Likely some do better than others under some conditions. In Florida there several related species beside the proper paw paw Asimina triloba.
Quote:
There are eight native species of pawpaws in Florida (Wunderlin, 2003). They are frequent from sandhills to flatwoods, scrubs to wet hammocks. Pawpaws are generally located in FL and GA, but the parviflora species extends to the rest of the southeastern states, and triloba covers the majority of the eastern states and a segment of Canada (Kartesz, 1999). http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-dir...imina-species/
If you do have paw paw fruit, just about everything in the woods may want to eat them.


Protographium marcellus, the zebra swallowtail, (formerly listed under genera Eurytides, Iphiclides, Graphium and Papilio by some authorities) is a swallowtail butterfly native to the eastern United States and southeast Canada. It is the state butterfly of Tennessee. Its distinctive wing shape and long tails make it easy to identify, and its black-and-white-striped pattern is reminiscent of a zebra.[1][2] The butterflies are closely associated with pawpaws, and are rarely found far from these trees. The green or black caterpillars feed on the leaves of various pawpaw species, while the adults feed on flower nectar and minerals from damp soil.
02-12-2020 08:58 AM
LoongLee Didn't know if the thread was dead and buried but wanted to share an article about paw paws and a recent proposal to make them the state fruit of Virginia. So there are people out there that recognize the fruit and it's qualities.
https://www.wtkr.com/news/bill-to-ma...tinued-to-2021
09-06-2019 06:41 PM
MBI I'm glad to see your paw paws starting to bear fruit. You're definitely having better luck than I am.

Of the three I've planted, two have died, the last one isn't doing well. It keeps appearing to die, then I'll get a sucker start off from the base of the trunk and it tries to start over from that sucker as the new trunk. I think I may just put it out of it's misery. Perhaps my soil here just isn't suited to them, even though on paper it should have been fine.

Most of my fruit trees haven't really thrived and all of them are much smaller than they should be for their age, mostly because of the soil here, I think. But with the exception of the peaches (three died and the last one was killed accidentally by my nephew) and the paw paws, at least the rest are all bearing fruit.

A partial exception is my nectarine tree (just the one), which is a tiny over-achiever. It won't seem to grow over 5' tall, but produces so much fruit the branches break if I don't thin out and remove about 80% of the fruit that starts growing. Every branch is pretty much solid nectarines growing out of them, all around the circumference and down their whole length, with leaves trying to poke out between them. It's odd and I haven't seen anything like it before. The fruit on this tiny tree is so thick, to the point that there just isn't room for them to grow because of them all being packed so tightly together. Then I thinned it out and removed most of them to leave room for the remaining fruits to grow.

But anyway, I don't mean to derail the thread. Congrats on your paw paws. I've about given up on mine.
09-06-2019 09:21 AM
Major Mjolnir I pulled the two remaining fruit this morning. I was unsure of how to tell ripeness since the skins were still pale green but they had rotated downwards on the stem and a thumbnail left a mark in the skin. There was also a marked softness that only became evident in the last 4 - 5 days.
I decided to 'harvest' them before Mrs. Possum came along and helped herself. The fruits were fairly small, about 6.6 ounces apiece and the one I ate had 12 seeds! The taste was delicious IMO, not too sweet but hints of banana and something else I can't put to a name. Five years from seed to fruit.
I plan to add a couple of named varieties to the small cluster of 4 I have growing and hope to start some of the seeds this Fall.
08-22-2019 11:53 AM
Major Mjolnir Well, got my first taste of Pawpaw in almost 60 years yesterday, since my vague memories of eating them at my Granddads at about the age of ten. Not intentionally since I believe that the few fruit on my young trees are still a few weeks from full maturation. We had some 50 mi./hr. straightline winds come through day before yesterday and while mowing yesterday I 'found' the fruit pictured at post #41 with the tire of my lawn mower. :\
The inside was pale golden yellow and the part that was soft enough to eat was similar in taste to bananna and slightly sweet. Not fully ripe of course but getting close. I did manage to salvage 6 large brown seeds and have them in the fridge to try to plant in pots in about 3 months. No idea if they are viable.
Hoping to have better luck with the two fruit still on the sister tree.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...0&postcount=41

Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Mjolnir View Post
Another exercise in futility his year :/ Dozens of fruit appeared to 'set' on both trees but currently only a single fruit appears to be growing, the rest are gone. The 110 in the pic is to show scale. These trees are siblings and both were covered in blooms and later small immature fruits. The singular fruit that is still growing gives me hope that I may be able to hand pollinate the two next year. I'm also hopeful that the two named varities I planted the year before that died back to the root stock may begin to flower next year since both are approaching 6' in height and could possibly add some genetic diversity.
Turns out each tree had two fruit try to grow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don H View Post
...I know they have to cross pollinate with an unrelated Paw Paw.
Probably true in order to get a full crop but the two siblings I mentioned in post #41 appear to have pollinated each other, at least two fruit on each tree. Not much of course but these are 5 years old and the first fruit they have 'set' and grown close to maturation. I have two non-related plants in the cluster that I hope will bloom next year and I also plan to try some hand pollination on selected limbs.
06-06-2019 02:10 PM
Don H I have a patch of Paw Paws in the white oak stand behind my house. They're about 4' tall now but I haven't seen any fruit yet. I know they have to cross pollinate with an unrelated Paw Paw.
06-06-2019 01:09 PM
Major Mjolnir
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prepper_Ed View Post
What state is this in? Could the excessively wet weather in the Midwest have anything to do with the lack of fruit?
Kentucky - same thing happened last year when only one tree bloomed so I doubt weather played a part but suspect lack of pollination.
06-06-2019 12:02 PM
Prepper_Ed What state is this in? Could the excessively wet weather in the Midwest have anything to do with the lack of fruit?
06-06-2019 05:52 AM
Major Mjolnir
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don H View Post
Do you think some animal is getting them? I know squirrels, and raccoons eat them.
I doubt that's the case. There are dozens of small fruits in clusters of 2 - 4, less than an inch long on both trees after the flowering stops and within days most of them are gone. If you look at the pictures at post #35 you'll see what I mean.
I think that the fruit sets but if unfertilized drops off or is re-absorbed but that is just conjecture on my part.

I should add this cluster of 4 trees is right next to the N. side of my house and I haven't seen any sign of animal activity.
06-05-2019 07:15 PM
Don H Do you think some animal is getting them? I know squirrels, and raccoons eat them.
06-05-2019 11:30 AM
Major Mjolnir Another exercise in futility his year :/ Dozens of fruit appeared to 'set' on both trees but currently only a single fruit appears to be growing, the rest are gone. The 110 in the pic is to show scale. These trees are siblings and both were covered in blooms and later small immature fruits. The singular fruit that is still growing gives me hope that I may be able to hand pollinate the two next year. I'm also hopeful that the two named varities I planted the year before that died back to the root stock may begin to flower next year since both are approaching 6' in height and could possibly add some genetic diversity.
05-11-2019 08:22 PM
Offrink When paw paws flower you are suppose to hang rotten meat. The flowers also smell of rotten meat.
05-08-2019 07:41 AM
Major Mjolnir Both Pawpaw siblings bloomed this year, and both appear to have set fruit. I did see some large bluish/black flies buzzing around them. Hoping for better luck than last year.
07-10-2018 11:34 AM
Major Mjolnir
Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Mjolnir View Post
I took some more pictures today and several, if not most of the blossoms, appear to be setting fruit! I'm not familiar with Asimina triloba's fruiting behavior - unfertilized fruit might just dry up and fall off. I simply don't know.
Unfortunately that appears to be the case here. The small fruit 'sets' were there for a few days and when I thought to check them a few days later, they were gone. Maybe next year.
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