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Thread: Fruit trees to plant for 2020? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-07-2019 07:58 PM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Still Standing View Post
It depends where you are.

A fact to consider is that most fruit trees will not bear useful crops without frequent applications of chemicals.

Another fact to consider is that pear trees, in particular, take around 10 years to produce their first crop of useful size. You plant, as the saying goes, pears for your heirs.

Growing fruit is hard work. Make it easy on yourself by sticking to things that do well in your climate and that require minimal fuss.

For me that's tart cherries, crab apples, and certain kinds of plums.
I get pretty good crops and I do not spray much. I only will do certain things like apply oil to a scale infection when I see or spray for a specific disease. Pick the right fruit trees and you problems will be minor. However, we are talking home consumption and not the market that wants clear skin fruit.
There are some exceptions to my statement. For chickawsaw plums one must spray for the plum curculio larva. Pears are quite bullet proof. some will get attacked by wasps, but most are ok.
For pears in my NWFL climate how many years it takes depends. Some are more precocous than others. The southern bartletts and golden boy will likely have their first pears within three years. At six years they will yielding good crops. Some rootstock is more precocious. Leona takes years for me for some reason. But you do make an important point fruit trees do require an investment of time prior to getting useful crops.

Also there are new diseases that pop up without warning. My non-astringent fuyu persimmons are being attacked by something, that does not touch the astringent kaki or the american persimmons so far with one exception. I had the tamopan (Astringent) grafted part of of a persimmon killed off by this mysterious illness. A neighbor of mine 2 miles has it on his fuyu. There are other reports including cases in Louisiana. I will ask my county agent. Normally kaki (Asian) persimmons are bullet proof.
Nothing is really guaranteed in homesteading.
10-07-2019 05:45 PM
Still Standing It depends where you are.

A fact to consider is that most fruit trees will not bear useful crops without frequent applications of chemicals.

Another fact to consider is that pear trees, in particular, take around 10 years to produce their first crop of useful size. You plant, as the saying goes, pears for your heirs.

Growing fruit is hard work. Make it easy on yourself by sticking to things that do well in your climate and that require minimal fuss.

For me that's tart cherries, crab apples, and certain kinds of plums.
10-06-2019 01:58 PM
RobertSWMissouri We have always found fruit challenging here is SW Missouri, have been looking for fool proof fruit to grow ( I was recently told pawpaw's are SUPER easy to graft... and ate some LARGE FRUIT with only a FEW seeds, they tend to grow like a weed here in SW Missouri,will be grafting this coming spring (have 3 native groves on the farm). Persimmons grow like a weed here too, and there are a number of AMERICAN persimmons that are also large with few seeds.... will be grafting improved persimmons this coming spring too. Just planted two Jujube trees, supposed to be just about insect and disease proof; there were a number of varieties at Powell gardens (East of Kansas City) with fruit all over the ground a couple weeks ago, large variety of taste / texture (no one was around, they were on the ground), wife liked Coco (Saw this for TX: https://www.texasgardener.com/pastis...08/Jujube.html ) She was OK with Li, but did NOT like fresh Lang (most common for drying like a date). Nomad: how do you care for your apples trees to get a decent crop ?
10-05-2019 06:18 PM
goat daddy I have been planting trees since we moved 8 years ago. gophers are hard on young trees. Also have bores which are hard on the older trees. This year I lost my apricot, plum, apple and pears to rodent and deer. I'll be grafting cherry, peaches, apples and nectarines this year, maybe apricots. Next year the plan is to buy another cherry tree and a persimmon tree. persimmons are hard to graft and mine died back to graft. plus I am not good at grafting. I need a brown fig. I have one great black fig and 3 starts. I'll do one near the big tree and the other two go near the creek. Fruit trees are an annual thing. I like grafting. I do have a white peach and nectarine to go in this year to replace the two that died.
10-05-2019 04:44 AM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaLou View Post
+1 paw-paw

Also might consider the small native plum trees. Here in zone 9 Texas they can sometimes be found growing wild roadside. Once established, they keep producing small delicious plums without any care required. My in-laws have several in their pasture been there for years dug up in Whitney. Good little trees.
You might be talking about chickasaw plums and their hybrids. The hybrids and selected for being larger chickasaw plums are often found as local family heirlooms are highly disease resistant plums. The basic wild type has very small plums. They form thickets ad are often considered as weeds in some places.
10-05-2019 01:29 AM
hawgy54 Kev, where do you get your trees?
10-05-2019 01:24 AM
LindaLou +1 paw-paw

Also might consider the small native plum trees. Here in zone 9 Texas they can sometimes be found growing wild roadside. Once established, they keep producing small delicious plums without any care required. My in-laws have several in their pasture been there for years dug up in Whitney. Good little trees.
10-04-2019 04:20 PM
LuniticFringeInc Kev...I would plant as many as I could of fruit and nut trees. What you cant eat fresh, can, dehydrate can be used to feed chickens and hogs and wildlife will undoubtedly get their share of the bounty too keeping their numbers high. Everytime I cut down a tree on my property I replace it with a suitable fruit or nut tree. The more I can produce the better off I am today and going forward. For me...I am focused on being more sustainable than I was yesterday.
10-04-2019 01:33 AM
Nomad, 2nd
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
A good discussion topic would be on what is the best zone for homesteading.
You mentioned citrus
.
Post a link to your thread....


I grew up with satsuma trees in the back yard... LOVE THEM.

But that part of the US is too densely populated.

Here I can get fruits from south, and north.

Sure friends have lemon trees in the town I went to grade school.
But I have cherries and 50+ raspberries.

Grain is an issue as j live on rocks, not dirt.... That's why I'm experimenting with chesrnut
But tanks don't work well in swamps and mts.
Helos and thermal have issues in Mts.

Apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, plums, cherries, figs, pawpaw, mulberry, jujubee, walnut, butternut, pecon, chestnut, hazilnut, hickory, acorns, blueberry, huckleberry, blackberry, rasberry, strawberry, seaberry, sure I'm forgetting a few....

I like perennials.
10-04-2019 12:25 AM
Jack Swilling When I lived in the So Cal mountains, I had plenty of chill hours, but it was Russian Roulette with a freeze and flower kill-off
aka no fruit,
Now in the Ozarks, on the Springfield Plateau
I am liking Mullberrys, Blueberries, Raspberries, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Elderberries
More reliable
Still have to deal with unpredictable weather
Good luch with your choices
10-04-2019 12:14 AM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
I'm in zone 6, one of the reasons I picked here is because other than citrus it'll grow about anything.

Got some muscadine, will plant more (I consider it a wild grape.)
back when I lived in the swamp I got some so sweet and juicy that i'd love to have on my Rocky hillside.
A good discussion topic would be on what is the best zone for homesteading.
You mentioned citrus
For My zone 8b
Citrus is actually marginal here and every so often a cold winter will kill what is above the ground. If you can get them growing on their own roots they can come back. If on typical rootstock after killing cold it will come back as rootstock that is usually trifolium or sour orange once the graft has died. Satsuma and grapefruit handle the cold best and limes the worst.
10-03-2019 11:42 PM
Nomad, 2nd
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
In my area apples do not grow so well. The Anna will grow well for me in zone 8b NW FL and there are a few more that will survive here. We plant more muscadines than grapes here. I have much better luck with chestnuts than pecans. This year I played around with medlars and they survived a very wet spring and a month plus drought so I think they will make here.
I'm in zone 6, one of the reasons I picked here is because other than citrus it'll grow about anything.

Got some muscadine, will plant more (I consider it a wild grape.)
back when I lived in the swamp I got some so sweet and juicy that i'd love to have on my Rocky hillside.
10-03-2019 11:17 PM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
It's not.


I am canning apple cider tonight.

I have canned 100ish quarts of pears cider so far this year, and while both are amazing.... The pear juice quantity FAR exceeds the apples (granted not cider apples) by in excess of a factor of 4.

By the time we defined the technique we were getting over 2 gal of pear cider per 5 gal bucket of pears.

I have ~40 Apple trees, I will be planting more pear trees.

If you look back on historical documents.... Colonial Americans drank amazing amounts of both hard and sweet cider.

something else to consider is:

Not all types of fruit will produce every year.

So my goal (will not achieve it this year) is to put back 18 months worth of preserves in 12 untill I have a 2 year stockpile (in excess of the current years production.)

That's enough to keep quality high, but not impact your normal diet if you miss a year due to your situation, or the unavailability of fruit.

Also, your production should be enough to make up for other types of fruits not producing that year in addition to plenty for years to come.

I'm short: I would do more than 2 of anything if you have the space.

Particularly as:
3 is 2
2 is 1
1 is none.

It's even more so with fruit as one is LITERALLY none of its not self polinating.

With over 100 trees all I plan on planting next year is a few more pecons, and my volunteer peaches. (Stone fruits I've read produce 90% true to type. I hope so as I get ~ 5 volunteers every year! )

This coming year I'm planting grapes and flowers.
In my area apples do not grow so well. The Anna will grow well for me in zone 8b NW FL and there are a few more that will survive here. We plant more muscadines than grapes here. I have much better luck with chestnuts than pecans. This year I played around with medlars and they survived a very wet spring and a month plus drought so I think they will make here.
10-03-2019 11:15 PM
Helion Maybe red and back plums?

Edit: Apricots too
10-03-2019 11:12 PM
barnetmill Do not forget loquats and mulberries even if they is not on your list. Stay away from mulberries that yield ripe white colored fruit.
10-03-2019 11:10 PM
barnetmill Location is given as east texas. growth zone not given.
Wanted trees
Fig
Pear
Nectarine
Peach

Fig no advice from me

The american pear for canning is the hard keiffer pear that also happens to be self fertile. There are many eating pears adapted for the SE that should do well in east Texas. Houston has a very active pear growing culture with some varieties that come from there like home acres, tenoshi, southern king, and some others.

Nectarine should be grafted on heirloom type white peach root stock for best success or Feral peaches if you can find them are good. Most nursey rootstocks used for peaches get borers.
Peach-get a white heirloom type like the rodenbury peach from just fruits and exotics.
10-03-2019 11:02 PM
Mazarine33 I think more pears. I enjoy them more than apples anymore, and I am going to seek out some different varieties. Plus I'd like to make a batch of perry and see how it does. Made wine and cider before, I'd like to try something different some day.
10-03-2019 10:56 PM
Nomad, 2nd
Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
Can yall believe it is already 2020?
It's not.


I am canning apple cider tonight.

I have canned 100ish quarts of pears cider so far this year, and while both are amazing.... The pear juice quantity FAR exceeds the apples (granted not cider apples) by in excess of a factor of 4.

By the time we defined the technique we were getting over 2 gal of pear cider per 5 gal bucket of pears.

I have ~40 Apple trees, I will be planting more pear trees.

If you look back on historical documents.... Colonial Americans drank amazing amounts of both hard and sweet cider.

something else to consider is:

Not all types of fruit will produce every year.

So my goal (will not achieve it this year) is to put back 18 months worth of preserves in 12 untill I have a 2 year stockpile (in excess of the current years production.)

That's enough to keep quality high, but not impact your normal diet if you miss a year due to your situation, or the unavailability of fruit.

Also, your production should be enough to make up for other types of fruits not producing that year in addition to plenty for years to come.

I'm short: I would do more than 2 of anything if you have the space.

Particularly as:
3 is 2
2 is 1
1 is none.

It's even more so with fruit as one is LITERALLY none of its not self polinating.

With over 100 trees all I plan on planting next year is a few more pecons, and my volunteer peaches. (Stone fruits I've read produce 90% true to type. I hope so as I get ~ 5 volunteers every year! )

This coming year I'm planting grapes and flowers.
10-03-2019 10:09 PM
kev
Fruit trees to plant for 2020?

Can yall believe it is already 2020? It seems like just a couple of years ago this forum was starting out.

This is more of a brain dump than anything else.

In the spring of 2020 my wife and I plan on planting several fruit trees in the chicken yard. I know this topic has been covered before, and like I stated previously, this is a brain dump.

Fig
Pear
Nectarine
Peach

Then again, I have two pear trees outside the chicken yard and would like to plant a third in the same location. So do I "really" need more pear trees?

Objective is fresh fruit to make jelly from.

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