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Thread: Southern USA- 'Tis the season: snakes Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-12-2014 08:49 AM
Runamok
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
Someone showed me netting that he used to protect his blue berries from birds. Snakes were often getting caught in the netting with fetal results for the snakes.
Some people will kill any and every snake. I have no problem with them as long as they aren't venomous. They can get rid of a lot of critters I don't want around my place. Kinda like bats, spiders, etc, not pretty but they do a good job getting rid of things I don't like.
05-11-2014 10:22 PM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Runamok View Post
Saw a bull snake this weekend that had died because it got its head caught in some erosion netting. I don't kill snakes around here because none are venomous. Further south are some rattlers though.
Someone showed me netting that he used to protect his blue berries from birds. Snakes were often getting caught in the netting with fetal results for the snakes.
05-11-2014 10:05 PM
Runamok Saw a bull snake this weekend that had died because it got its head caught in some erosion netting. I don't kill snakes around here because none are venomous. Further south are some rattlers though.
05-11-2014 08:34 PM
solinvictus I've got king snakes and rat snakes on the property and I leave them alone, unless I have to shoo one of them out of the way for controlled burning.
05-11-2014 08:07 PM
farmer13 Covered up with Water Mocs. and Timber Rattlesankes so far this year on the farm
05-11-2014 06:56 PM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragunov View Post
If it's REALLY shiny black, possibly with some brown mottling near the belly..... Probably an indigo snake. Pics?
Sighting lasted about 10 seconds in brush with the snake moving fast so no pictures. Back was shiny, but the sun was on it and a recently molted black snake can be shiny in the sun. The scales did not appear course, but I could wrong about that. Never saw the belly. The main thing I am looking for is to be sure it is not a moccasin and it was not. Indigo snakes do occur in this area and people are more positive when you see an 5 foot plus black snake it is likely an indigo. I just looked it up and there is often some red about the head. They use gopher tortoise and I suppose gulf box turtle burrows which occur on my place. I would love to have an indigo snake on my place.
05-11-2014 06:02 PM
Dragunov
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
I am taking a break from brush clearing. I ran out to empty two tank fulls on my husky weed whacker that has a 10' studded tungsten carbide blade on it. I saw the biggest black snake I have ever seen. This snake was easily 4 ft and could have been also an indigo snake. Moving fast like they usually do on a mission to find food which is great with me.
If it's REALLY shiny black, possibly with some brown mottling near the belly..... Probably an indigo snake. Pics?
05-11-2014 03:46 PM
barnetmill I am taking a break from brush clearing. I ran out to empty two tank fulls on my husky weed whacker that has a 10' studded tungsten carbide blade on it. I saw the biggest black snake I have ever seen. This snake was easily 4 ft and could have been also an indigo snake. Moving fast like they usually do on a mission to find food which is great with me.
05-11-2014 03:38 PM
Dragunov
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
I did not realize that Hognose snakes were in there with the Boomslang. Are there any other rear-fang Colubrid snakes in the united states?

I looked it up: and there is an article: Evidence of toxic saliva in some colubrid snakes of the United States

Donald M. McKinstry Toxicon Volume 16, Issue 6, 1978, Pages 523–534
I could get the abstract, but not the article. Yes there is quite a bit of potential toxicity in quite few snakes since this is a very large serpent family.
I'll just give common names:

Hognose snakes.
Night snakes.
Lyre snakes.
Ring neck snakes.
Crowned snake (Mostly in Mexico).

Hognose, and Lyre snakes (cat eyed) are the only ones with enough venom to make you take notice.
05-11-2014 11:28 AM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragunov View Post
I'm of a mind that ALL snakes have a mildly toxic saliva. However, the ones with "modified" glands, come in three varieties:

Vipers, and Pit vipers:
Gaboon vipers, Puff adders, European adders are true vipers, Cottonmouths, Rattlesnakes, Bushmasters, Waglers pit vipers, are all pit vipers.

Elapids:
Coral snakes, Mambas, cobras, Kraits, and sea snakes, are examples of Elapids.

Colubrids:
Boomslangs, Twig snakes, Mussuranas, Hognose snakes, Lyre snakes, Night snakes, and Mangrove snakes, are all examples of Rear-fanged Colubrids.

Any of the above, can/will cause systemic envenomation, so be careful around them.
I did not realize that Hognose snakes were in there with the Boomslang. Are there any other rear-fang Colubrid snakes in the united states?

I looked it up: and there is an article: Evidence of toxic saliva in some colubrid snakes of the United States

Donald M. McKinstry Toxicon Volume 16, Issue 6, 1978, Pages 523–534
I could get the abstract, but not the article. Yes there is quite a bit of potential toxicity in quite few snakes since this is a very large serpent family.
05-11-2014 11:18 AM
Macdaddy I never killed a snake on purpose. I figure they are benificial even the poisionus ones. I use to catch snakes of all types when I was young even copperheads. I am aware of their habitats and avoid them during the warm seasons.
05-11-2014 11:08 AM
Dragunov
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
I have just read your other posts on the link. I have read claims of people having reactions to other types of snake bite from what are considered non-venomous snakes. Venom is stated to come from modified salivary glands. Salivary glands are present in most snakes. If a snake can manage to lock its jaws on a part of your body those secretions can get into you system and may not be benign. Basically I do not handle snakes and l let them except for the vipers go on their way. Last time I dealt with a hognose snake I took a shovel and tossed it off my driveway into the woods. it would show there every fall. One year it apparently ended up at my neighbor's yard and she called another neighbor that came by and "bravely" kill it.
I'm of a mind that ALL snakes have a mildly toxic saliva. However, the ones with "modified" glands, come in three varieties:

Vipers, and Pit vipers:
Gaboon vipers, Puff adders, European adders are true vipers, Cottonmouths, Rattlesnakes, Bushmasters, Waglers pit vipers, are all pit vipers.

Elapids:
Coral snakes, Mambas, cobras, Kraits, and sea snakes, are examples of Elapids.

Colubrids:
Boomslangs, Twig snakes, Mussuranas, Hognose snakes, Lyre snakes, Night snakes, and Mangrove snakes, are all examples of Rear-fanged Colubrids.

Any of the above, can/will cause systemic envenomation, so be careful around them.
05-11-2014 11:06 AM
TxHannah So far I've only seen baby copperheads. Hate to dispatch anything, but can't run the physical and financial risk of being bitten. With the drought the past few years I haven't even seen any cotton mouths. Non venomous snakes I leave alone.
05-11-2014 09:54 AM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by REM View Post
This is the time of year here at least when they are in pairs, so if you see one look before you step.

My first snake sighting of the season was two snakes. It was one of our black pine racer snakes eating another snake. I think the other snake which was brown was a corn snake, but I am not sure. A week later I and my dogs saw 3ft corn snake crawling about. Dogs became agitated and barked a lot. One of them did hold her distance. and continued to make quite a racket. Good behavior for not getting bit. She has the build of the more ancient Alaunt type dogs and she is full of useful instincts. I am more fearful of my dogs getting bitten than I am for myself. A friend's dog got bitten by a pigmy rattler and it cost him almost $2,000 to treat it over night in doggie ICU. Neighbor's rottie/GSD mix of 120 lbs. was bitten by a small moccasin and was sick for about 2 weeks.
05-11-2014 09:41 AM
REM This is the time of year here at least when they are in pairs, so if you see one look before you step.
05-11-2014 09:20 AM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragunov View Post
Give me a minute, and I'll direct you to a couple posts of my full experience.

You don't need fear them, the ONLY way I've EVER seen them actually bite, are the two, above circumstances. Next time you run into one, tease him with a stick (don't hurt him though!) long enough, and he'll roll over and play dead.
They ARE actually gentle enough that children (under supervision) can handle them quite safely.

My account of the two Hoggie bites I've been involved with:

(Posts 29, and 30 are mine).

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...57#post6488457
I have just read your other posts on the link. I have read claims of people having reactions to other types of snake bite from what are considered non-venomous snakes. Venom is stated to come from modified salivary glands. Salivary glands are present in most snakes. If a snake can manage to lock its jaws on a part of your body those secretions can get into you system and may not be benign. Basically I do not handle snakes and l let them except for the vipers go on their way. Last time I dealt with a hognose snake I took a shovel and tossed it off my driveway into the woods. it would show there every fall. One year it apparently ended up at my neighbor's yard and she called another neighbor that came by and "bravely" kill it.
05-11-2014 09:02 AM
Slclarry Oh yes. Killed one last week in a flower bed at my garage. Promptly cut his head off with a pickax. Didn't really think about most of my utilities entering the house near there.

Later that night we noticed our internet was down. Bellsouth came out and verified the line in was open. As he was hooking up the new line he said usually this happened when people were digging in the yard. That's about the time "Rocket Scientist" here figured out what he had done.

No. At that point I didn't admit it to the tech. That stinking snake had to curl up over that line on purpose.
05-11-2014 08:40 AM
Dragunov
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsymoonfarm View Post
My instant, gut reaction was fear. He looked poisonous. I've kept snakes as pets and have been bitten by young pythons when I worked in a pet shop. I actually love reptiles, but when this one flattened his head and rose up I backed away.

Thanks for sharing your experience, I had planned on a closer investigation because several sources said they aren't toxic to humans.
Give me a minute, and I'll direct you to a couple posts of my full experience.

You don't need fear them, the ONLY way I've EVER seen them actually bite, are the two, above circumstances. Next time you run into one, tease him with a stick (don't hurt him though!) long enough, and he'll roll over and play dead.
They ARE actually gentle enough that children (under supervision) can handle them quite safely.

My account of the two Hoggie bites I've been involved with:

(Posts 29, and 30 are mine).

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...57#post6488457
05-11-2014 08:04 AM
Chrysalis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragunov View Post
Yes they are, I have the hospital bill, and scar to prove it. They don't bite under most circumstances, however, if you've been handling amphibians, particularly toads, they will bite as a feeding response. If you step on them, they will bite. And just in case you think I mis-identified the snake, I'm a Herpetologist. I was bitten by Heterodon platyrhinos (Eastern hognose snake).
My instant, gut reaction was fear. He looked poisonous. I've kept snakes as pets and have been bitten by young pythons when I worked in a pet shop. I actually love reptiles, but when this one flattened his head and rose up I backed away.

Thanks for sharing your experience, I had planned on a closer investigation because several sources said they aren't toxic to humans.
05-11-2014 07:56 AM
Dragunov
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsymoonfarm View Post
I was hunting morels last weekend and almost stepped on a nasty looking little devil, he reared up so I stepped back and took a couple pics. It was a hog-nosed snake. Turns out they aren't poisonous.

I was a little embarrassed because my niece was with me and had never heard me scream. She proceeded to tell the whole family when we got back.
Yes they are, I have the hospital bill, and scar to prove it. They don't bite under most circumstances, however, if you've been handling amphibians, particularly toads, they will bite as a feeding response. If you step on them, they will bite. And just in case you think I mis-identified the snake, I'm a Herpetologist. I was bitten by Heterodon platyrhinos (Eastern hognose snake).
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