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Thread: Whats the ONE Best Crop to Grow? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-18-2011 12:47 PM
Ydoom Nedav
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoast Grower View Post
I think beans would be the best "one crop only" choice.

The plant is relatively small and will go from seedling to full size quick, shortening the wait period before harvest.
Bean plants give back some nutrients to the soil (tilling the plant increases nitrogen levels), helping next year's crop.
The plant can be consumed as sprouts.
The bean can be eaten fresh, or dried then cooked later.
Dried beans have excellent shelf life.
Beans do not require vigourous water intake.
One plant can provide enough seeds for following season.
Beans are healthy, and a good source of protein.

Of course there is that little gas thing...
I'm going with this one here. Beans are where it's at. And I will add that they can be ground into flour.

Of course, if you grew marijuana, you could use it to barter for anything. But then again, you would draw attention to yourself and be a target once the word got out.
11-18-2011 11:46 AM
merlinfire On small amounts of land? Potato is easily a high calorie value per acre crop.
11-18-2011 11:43 AM
Runeback Amaranth, gives carbs and protein is disease resistant and grows like crazy
11-18-2011 01:02 AM
BuginBoy
Quote:
Originally Posted by NinjaBot View Post
Go with the Three Sisters.
I tried that one time, it took me two weeks to recover!!
11-18-2011 12:47 AM
BuginBoy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampwood View Post
Potato..

Sorry... I prefer to answer a question with just one word.

So, you've been married quite a while have you?
11-17-2011 08:59 PM
txflyer tater's and snap beans.

oops that's two.
11-17-2011 08:59 PM
Levant Easily Marijuana.
11-17-2011 08:57 PM
Carbine Cory The MARIJUA.....i mean.......cannabis sativa, indica, and ruderalis.
11-17-2011 08:32 PM
eskrima
Quote:
Originally Posted by I Buried My Guns View Post
That said, Collard Greens totally kick butt: produced edible product
hmmm, I have to disagree with you on this. Collard Greens are one of the most foulest smelling, tasting thing that there is. when I was young and living at home, I would not even venture into the house when my mom was cooking that crap .

11-17-2011 08:20 PM
TheTexasHammer Just wanted to say this is a great thread.

Anyone interested in Amaranth, I grew it last year but the heat killed it off before I could do a lot with it. Anyway, I used the stuff I bought at the grocery store, it grew fine. I regret not having had the chance to cook the greens.
11-17-2011 07:32 PM
smokinthelast1
Quote:
Originally Posted by I Buried My Guns View Post
Speaking of beans:

A member here noted that it is possible to buy beans from the supermarket and plant them, as they are seeds and have not been irradiated or otherwise sterilized. I tried this with a bag of mixed soup beans from HEB (a supermarket).

Well, they came up, but poorly. Many were stunted, deformed or simply just "tarded". Only one variety produced beans (A white-colored variety), and I am gonna try to plant these next season. I got 14 beans total.

I don't know if it was my fault or God's. There are just too many variables to assign blame.
PS: I tried to grow sweet potatoes by cutting out and planting the "eyes" as they put out roots in my cupboard. I did not know that sweet potatoes are very palatable to my dogs, who ate every last one of them, after they were in the ground.

I built a fence this year.
Yes you are right. One big tip, one ounce of wheat grass juice (Hand full of grass) is more than enough to keep you going for months. Very quick 7days. It will give you an engery boost like no other.
11-17-2011 06:27 PM
Hick Industries
Quote:
Originally Posted by fat larry View Post
It takes an awful lot of ground to grow enough corn to feed a family for a year and even more water..
I would probably have to say Potatoes they store well you can grow allot in a little space they are not nitrogen dependent like many other crops and they may not be the perfect nutritional crop they will fill you up and keep you alive.
Field corn is not a bad start.

Assuming you could live on nothing but corn, it would take a plot of land 60 ft x 60 ft to support one person for a year. It is indigenous to north America and the open pollinated varieties are fairly resistant to bugs. It stores for several years by simply hanging it by the shucks oiut of reach from rodents.

A better idea is to plant at least six storage crops, plus several nut trees, plus fruit trees and berry vines.

I would choose three types of corn, three types of dry beans, pumpkins and winter squash, winter wheat, split peas, and potatoes.
11-17-2011 06:21 PM
HB of CJ
Corn, Potatoes, Turnips, Cabbage, Beans,

We need to have a balanced intake of essential amino acids. Growing just one crop doesn't cut it. HB of CJ (old coot)
11-17-2011 03:57 PM
Tracker_Buckmann
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackrorabbit View Post
I would add that a yam is a good substitute if not the better veggie.
i remember reading about a tribe in africa that ate mostly a diet of yams. They lived in many cases beyond 100 years and never had a case of cancer.
11-17-2011 03:12 PM
en-ki
Quote:
Originally Posted by I Buried My Guns View Post
Speaking of beans:

A member here noted that it is possible to buy beans from the supermarket and plant them, as they are seeds and have not been irradiated or otherwise sterilized. I tried this with a bag of mixed soup beans from HEB (a supermarket).

Well, they came up, but poorly. Many were stunted, deformed or simply just "tarded". Only one variety produced beans (A white-colored variety), and I am gonna try to plant these next season. I got 14 beans total.

I don't know if it was my fault or God's. There are just too many variables to assign blame.
PS: I tried to grow sweet potatoes by cutting out and planting the "eyes" as they put out roots in my cupboard. I did not know that sweet potatoes are very palatable to my dogs, who ate every last one of them, after they were in the ground.

I built a fence this year.
Instead of direct planting the eyes, bury the whole sweet potato in about six inches of seasoned saw dust and keep moist. When the plants reach about 8 inches tall, carefully pull them from the potato and plant them. Maybe that will foil the dogs.
11-17-2011 01:17 PM
Tracker_Buckmann one word for ya: "monoculture". Didn't work out so hot for the irish.
11-17-2011 12:50 PM
Routestep For I buried my guns,

I bought a 14 or 15 bean soup mix in the store and got them all to grow. I had to kill off the lima beans as they wouldn't die. I plan to plant again next spring and see how they do.

Best single plant in a survival situation for calories? Either the potato or sweet potato is my guess. But I have to say that winter squash is a little less work for just about the same nutrition. You don't have to dig them up.
11-17-2011 12:36 PM
I Buried My Guns
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinthelast1 View Post
They will keep growing after a frost. Boil them down in viginar water and a ham bone. About like you do beans. Takes hours to get a good pot but done right they are outstanding.
Speaking of beans:

A member here noted that it is possible to buy beans from the supermarket and plant them, as they are seeds and have not been irradiated or otherwise sterilized. I tried this with a bag of mixed soup beans from HEB (a supermarket).

Well, they came up, but poorly. Many were stunted, deformed or simply just "tarded". Only one variety produced beans (A white-colored variety), and I am gonna try to plant these next season. I got 14 beans total.

I don't know if it was my fault or God's. There are just too many variables to assign blame.
PS: I tried to grow sweet potatoes by cutting out and planting the "eyes" as they put out roots in my cupboard. I did not know that sweet potatoes are very palatable to my dogs, who ate every last one of them, after they were in the ground.

I built a fence this year.
11-17-2011 12:17 PM
smokinthelast1
Quote:
Originally Posted by I Buried My Guns View Post
I have poor soil, and do not possess a green thumb.

I also live in a climatic zone with oppresive heat that many plants cannot tolerate.

Every year I relive the deaths of my less tolerant plants, and mourn for them.

That said, Collard Greens totally kick butt: they grow in my poor soil, tolerate the heat and have produced edible product for the last seven months. My wife is sick of eating them, but they continue to live and put out new leaves after I cut the old ones off (to eat).

I am not a cheerleader for Collard Greens. They are bland and the only way I can redeem them is by frying in bacon grease. However, they grew prolifically this year and were impossible to kill.

I am not a Southerner; I had never tasted or even seen Collard Greens before last Spring. If you had asked me I would have guessed they were something you wore around your neck.

PS: I did not grow them from seed; I saw them outside my supermarket in a six pack of baby plants; now they are almost 3 feet high.

The freeze is coming, so my wife is about to get a reprieve.
They will keep growing after a frost. Boil them down in viginar water and a ham bone. About like you do beans. Takes hours to get a good pot but done right they are outstanding.
11-17-2011 12:14 PM
I Buried My Guns I have poor soil, and do not possess a green thumb.

I also live in a climatic zone with oppresive heat that many plants cannot tolerate.

Every year I relive the deaths of my less tolerant plants, and mourn for them.

That said, Collard Greens totally kick butt: they grow in my poor soil, tolerate the heat and have produced edible product for the last seven months. My wife is sick of eating them, but they continue to live and put out new leaves after I cut the old ones off (to eat).

I am not a cheerleader for Collard Greens. They are bland and the only way I can redeem them is by frying in bacon grease. However, they grew prolifically this year and were impossible to kill.

I am not a Southerner; I had never tasted or even seen Collard Greens before last Spring. If you had asked me I would have guessed they were something you wore around your neck.

PS: I did not grow them from seed; I saw them outside my supermarket in a six pack of baby plants; now they are almost 3 feet high.

The freeze is coming, so my wife is about to get a reprieve.
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