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Thread: A Step Saving Kitchen, 1949 Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-16-2020 08:57 PM
BrettTheOkie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I plan to build a small (28" x 36") mobile island with concealed fixed (for stability) casters. My idea is that it could be moved to gain floor space as needed or moved next to a counter if more counter space is needed for a special operation or project.
I've considered the mobile kitchen island idea myself, but I don't think the kitchen here is really big enough to make it practical. And honestly, the days of cooking for larger groups of people here seem to have pretty much passed.
01-16-2020 08:52 PM
BrettTheOkie
Quote:
Originally Posted by cook View Post
goose neck faucet over stove,footpedal activated preferred
When I bought this house almost 11 years ago, one of the first things I did was have the original, contractor-grade kitchen sink and fixtures taken out and replaced them with very nice deep sinks and a goose neck faucet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cook View Post
deep 3 compartment sink with drainboard and overhead sprayhose stainless steel
Even better, TWO sets of 3-compartment sinks... one strictly for food preparation and the other strictly for washing pots & pans, etc.
01-16-2020 08:51 PM
Cabinet Maker Lol. In1949, many bugs were looked at as additional protein.
01-16-2020 08:46 PM
BrettTheOkie
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCalHippie View Post
Interesting ideas but things like unsealed flour bins are just asking for bugs to move in. Those type of things get put into sealed containers around here.
Agreed, that's what I was saying earlier in this thread. I wouldn't want foodstuffs stored in the open like that, even if it was something that I was using on a daily basis and it never stayed in the bin for very long.
01-16-2020 05:07 PM
Eddie_T I plan to build a small (28" x 36") mobile island with concealed fixed (for stability) casters. My idea is that it could be moved to gain floor space as needed or moved next to a counter if more counter space is needed for a special operation or project.

I wouldn't be too difficult to make it height adjustable but I probably won't as my meal preparation is kept simple as possible. I bought a bag of King Arthur flour a couple of months ago to make yeast bread but it's still sitting on the counter.

I like using sheet Formica 180fx, I redid my counters with it and hid the seams in inconspicuous places. Matching ogee edging is available also though I may just use molding for the island.
01-16-2020 03:14 PM
cook Being a chef,there a lot of things I'd like to have in my home kitchen that is standard in commercial,just not practical.
1)tile floor and baseboards with floor drain,water proof for mopping/hosing

2)goose neck faucet over stove,footpedal activated preferred

3) deep 3 compartment sink with drainboard and overhead sprayhose stainless steel
01-16-2020 12:22 PM
NCalHippie Interesting ideas but things like unsealed flour bins are just asking for bugs to move in. Those type of things get put into sealed containers around here.

I designed our kitchen and then designed the house around it. The working part of the kitchen is on one side of the island and has a 14' work triangle with a prep sink in the island. the rest of the kitchen is a large U with a 9' cabinet on the open wall. 32' of granite counter top and 56 drawers and cabinets.
01-16-2020 10:50 AM
Cabinet Maker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
For me any lengthy task at an inconvenient height can cause back stress and pain. The back will subconsciously hunch if the work is too low. I am just recalling helping my wife can peppers, my job was cutting them into rings.

Honestly, I don't have a clue except for my own kitchen experience. I have wished the sink was higher for washing dishes and I don't spend much time at that but sinks can't very well be temporarily lifted.
Sounds like youre taller than the average bear. A chunk of butcher block on larger bun type feet will get the cutting surface up as much as 3. Hate to say it, but posture can be an issue also. And youre right, not much to do about the sink.
01-15-2020 11:14 PM
Eddie_T
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinet Maker View Post
Years ago, I did a kitchen for a couple, both over 64. We set the counters at 39 high. (Standard is 36)
If Im designing for a serious baker, I try to incorporate a minimum 3 wide marble or some other type of solid surface at 30 high just for rolling and kneading.

Ive never had a request based on canning work. Why is higher easier on the back?
For me any lengthy task at an inconvenient height can cause back stress and pain. The back will subconsciously hunch if the work is too low. I am just recalling helping my wife can peppers, my job was cutting them into rings.

Honestly, I don't have a clue except for my own kitchen experience. I have wished the sink was higher for washing dishes and I don't spend much time at that but sinks can't very well be temporarily lifted.
01-15-2020 06:06 PM
Cabinet Maker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
I was raised in a 1927 house. It, had been modernized with a GE electric stove and Youngstown Kitchen steel sink and cabinets.

The raised counter spaces for the work height testing gave me an idea. If a tall person is working in the kitchen during canning season a temporary raised counter could save some back pain.

Years ago, I did a kitchen for a couple, both over 64. We set the counters at 39 high. (Standard is 36)
If Im designing for a serious baker, I try to incorporate a minimum 3 wide marble or some other type of solid surface at 30 high just for rolling and kneading.

Ive never had a request based on canning work. Why is higher easier on the back?
01-15-2020 11:14 AM
Eddie_T I was raised in a 1927 house. It, had been modernized with a GE electric stove and Youngstown Kitchen steel sink and cabinets.

The raised counter spaces for the work height testing gave me an idea. If a tall person is working in the kitchen during canning season a temporary raised counter could save some back pain.
01-14-2020 12:45 PM
BrettTheOkie
Quote:
Originally Posted by old-grunt View Post
I can remember similar kitchens and the metal cabinets
I forgot to mention in my post above that both our house and my grandparent's house had metal kitchen cabinets and drawers.
01-14-2020 12:15 PM
Jojo
Quote:
Originally Posted by old-grunt View Post
Houses built in 70's or earlier made much better use of space,later houses just dont have the storage space,I can remember similar kitchens and the metal cabinets,I remember the open bins,not the small ones but ones that held roughly a bushel of potatoes.
Built-in's, Built-in's EVERYWHERE in the 70's! One of my friends house was way cool. At first glance there was no stove top in the kitchen only 2 wall ovens. The 6 electric burners were in drawers, spaced around the kitchen.
The master bedroom closet had one small 2.5ft door and a switch beside it.
Open the door and the light comes on. There is a rack like they have at the cleaners, flip the switch to rotate and find what you want. If the power went out there was a pulley system to the right of the door than you could move it with by hand.
01-14-2020 07:00 AM
GrizzlyetteAdams When I designed my kitchen, I included two supersized kitchen cabinet drawers (similar to the #2 "wonderbox" in the link below), to use for thermal "cooking."

It is my adaptation of the old fashioned "haybox" cooking style, which saves drastically on fuel. More about this in the link:

https://www.milkwood.net/2015/07/06/thermal-cooking/
01-14-2020 06:26 AM
Pabstman It seems to me that they actually had some good ideas. Considering how small the kitchen is they utilized the space rather well.
01-14-2020 06:06 AM
old-grunt Houses built in 70's or earlier made much better use of space,later houses just dont have the storage space,I can remember similar kitchens and the metal cabinets,I remember the open bins,not the small ones but ones that held roughly a bushel of potatoes.
I live in a 3600' foot house 5 bedrooms 3 bathrooms built in 1996 I grew up in a 1200' house 2 bedrooms 1 bathroom probably built around 1900,moved to this house from a 1600' foot house 3 bedrooms 1 bathroom built in 1880 something, both old houses had twice the storage space of my modern house.
01-13-2020 04:47 AM
cook Not sure if Disney Orlando still has it,but they had an exhibit called the carousel of progress.I "think" they had a example of what a "modern"kitchen looked like.This was back in the 70's ?
01-12-2020 11:12 PM
zebra007 Cool to see a lot of the ideas are basically used or incorporated in current kitchens. Unfortunately, for some people a toaster oven and microwave are all they need.
01-12-2020 09:21 PM
Chuckleberry `

That video made me think of this song.

.


01-12-2020 09:07 PM
BrettTheOkie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinet Maker View Post
Thanks for that.

Many of these principles are still incorporated today in design. Although Ive never seen a trash bucket with outside access...
These days, someone would probably use that feature to try to break in.
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