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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-09-2014 02:46 PM
Lawyerman
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishCannon View Post
I understand the ease of storing and cost, but why choose white rice or jasmine when there are healthier options available? Even white basmatti rice has a much lower glycemic index and won't cause the major spike in blood sugar.

Most store-bought grains, in general, are filler foods. Our culture tends to eat the most of these when they should be eating them the least.

IMO, being healthy and taking care of your well being is an imperative part of survivalism. Your stored foods should reflect that somewhat. Not saying any of this is BAD to have (I have all of it in my preps too), it's just not ideal to live off of it.
Because Basmati doesn't store nearly as well for one thing.
12-09-2014 02:43 PM
PreppingPros.com On a little side note. You may want to bump up the amount of salt your storing. Would be useful to prep meat you may obtain post shtf. It would also be a great bartering tool. Looking good!
12-09-2014 02:36 PM
GG42 I have not read ALL the posts, so it is likely the issues have been addressed already.
But here it goes: 1. It is impossible to survive for a year based on OPs list. With the things listed a (previously) healthy adult would get sick after a couple of months, the exact time depends on his current diet and how healthy he is now.
2. There is no fats listed, this is a quick death. Amount of protein is not remotely sufficient.
3. I don't see any vitamins
4. I don't see any stimulants. Many people are opposed to them, but having them (even for emergencies only) is absolutely essential. I am talking about caffeine (in any form), at least.
5. As was mentioned before, 2000 calories is grossly insufficient under almost any conditions, especially in cold weather.
12-08-2014 11:14 PM
bdcochran The following is not a criticism. It is a series of observations.
The following assumptions are implicitly in the excellent breakdown of costs, calories, and quantities:
1. There is no wastage;
2. There is a reasonable supply of fuel for cooking;
3. There is a reasonable supply of clean water for food preparation and clean up;
4. There is no concern about cooking odors attracting unwanted attention;
5. The consumer will be fully healthy and able to prepare his or her food;
6. There will be no guests.
7. The consumer values his or her time at zero and expects to have the time to devote to cooking.

If those assumptions fail (particularly the challenges of people smelling your food, being completely healthy, having clean water and having fuel), then the choices and calculations need some refinement.

In the “real world”, the reader of this thread is not living on 2000 calories a day. Come on! You are going to go through a serious weight loss at that level – probably a weight loss that is needed though.

If you realistically do not contemplate “bugging out”, “living off the land”, “farming without distractions” or look in the mirror and understand that you are not physically fit like an old time hunter gatherer or have medical problems, then you need to consider at least a partial modification.

All around you will be people who do not have water, have not put aside food, or have serious medical problems requiring daily treatment. There will be old people and babies and pre-schoolers relying on others for survival. They will want what you have and take it from you if your resources are brought to their attention.


f you can take a low profile for as long as 30 days, you will avoid the initial and very large die off of humans after shtf and when there is no governmental relief within a few days. So think about surviving (injured or not) without cooking, without gathering fuel, not having clean up or wastage, and using a minimal amount of water each day.

A can each of tuna fish/sardines/spam/stew, vegetables, and fruit (like fruit cocktail) will provide the protein, vitamins and nutrients, but not the calories. That works out to 90 cans per person. You have to get past the first 30 days after shtf to have any shot at going on for a year.
11-19-2013 10:24 PM
willthrill81
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishCannon View Post
I understand the ease of storing and cost, but why choose white rice or jasmine when there are healthier options available? Even white basmatti rice has a much lower glycemic index and won't cause the major spike in blood sugar.

Most store-bought grains, in general, are filler foods. Our culture tends to eat the most of these when they should be eating them the least.

IMO, being healthy and taking care of your well being is an imperative part of survivalism. Your stored foods should reflect that somewhat. Not saying any of this is BAD to have (I have all of it in my preps too), it's just not ideal to live off of it.
Where I live, jasmine rice (forget basmati) costs double what white rice does. That's a pretty big incentive right there for me and probably others to to stick with white rice. Do I want 3 months worth of jasmine rice or 6 months of white rice? Not a tough question to answer.

MikeK is right. Literally billions of people today would say that they are (and would be) perfectly happy to get sufficient calories from 'filler' (i.e. cheap) food.

That being said, I would hope that no one here is getting most of their calories from eating simple carbohydrates like white rice on an everyday basis. However, in an emergency situation, you don't need nutrition; you need calories. You can live just fine for a long time getting 80%+ of your calories from plain old white rice. Ask an Asian.

A lot of people here like wheat, and there's no doubt that wheat berries of almost any kind are good food. My issue with wheat is that you need to store it in berry form to get the maximum shelf life. However, it takes a lot of energy, whether elbow grease or otherwise, to convert those berries into something edible. White rice, on the other hand, can be eaten without even cooking if you soak it in water for a couple of days.
11-19-2013 07:37 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catnphx View Post
Why barley, Mike? I was in Honeyville this past weekend and saw bags of it and wondered why I might want that ... can you elaborate? Thanks
Mostly because I like it.

It's a healthy, easy to cook and versatile grain. I've always been particular to it. So it just made sense for me to store it.
11-19-2013 07:32 PM
Catnphx
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
But I store a lot more of other grains. Wheat is my number one. Followed by barley.
Why barley, Mike? I was in Honeyville this past weekend and saw bags of it and wondered why I might want that ... can you elaborate? Thanks
11-19-2013 05:47 PM
IrishCannon
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
White rice doesn't seem to be hurting the Asian nations any. They eat a healthier diet than typical Americans, even though they have a lot of white carbs in it.

But I store a lot more of other grains. Wheat is my number one. Followed by barley. People buy rice because it's easy to find locally and cheap.
I understand the ease of storing and cost, but why choose white rice or jasmine when there are healthier options available? Even white basmatti rice has a much lower glycemic index and won't cause the major spike in blood sugar.

Most store-bought grains, in general, are filler foods. Our culture tends to eat the most of these when they should be eating them the least.

IMO, being healthy and taking care of your well being is an imperative part of survivalism. Your stored foods should reflect that somewhat. Not saying any of this is BAD to have (I have all of it in my preps too), it's just not ideal to live off of it.
11-19-2013 05:00 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishCannon View Post
This is fine for a start, but what about some high-quality protein (meats), olive oil, and nuts? How about adding some quinoa?

I don't know what the infatuation with white rice is. I understand it's cheap and stores long; even I have some basmatti rice stored, but it's not a great option. I kind of see it as the last resort.

Quinoa is protein dense, lots of vitamins, and a good source of total nutrients.
White rice doesn't seem to be hurting the Asian nations any. They eat a healthier diet than typical Americans, even though they have a lot of white carbs in it.

But I store a lot more of other grains. Wheat is my number one. Followed by barley. People buy rice because it's easy to find locally and cheap.
11-19-2013 03:59 PM
IrishCannon This is fine for a start, but what about some high-quality protein (meats), olive oil, and nuts? How about adding some quinoa?

I don't know what the infatuation with white rice is. I understand it's cheap and stores long; even I have some basmatti rice stored, but it's not a great option. I kind of see it as the last resort.

Quinoa is protein dense, lots of vitamins, and a good source of total nutrients.
11-18-2013 08:06 AM
Sacajawea Long-term storage goal here, is 2 years - as a just in case backup, in case of crop failure. I'm starting a brand new garden (for the 3rd or 4th time) and know from experience that each environment takes some getting used to, some experience (including failure), to begin to produce enough to put back enough to get through our short winters - and iffy spring weather.

I'm getting there, but still have a ways to go. I'm going to second both the "store what you eat" and also variety ideas. Face it, when we cook we make about 20 different recipes on a regular basis -- even with grocery stores full of out of season produce. Then, there are the items that we cook once in a while that we really like... (lamb falls into that category for us). If I was really good, I'd premix some meatloaf and freeze it - so it could be thawed and popped into an oven or put on the grill, in a dutch oven.

One thing I've started to do, is seal up some basic recipes with those preps. So if someone else is here, or if our brains are stressed or tired, I have those recipes handy for ideas of what to make, with what's on hand. (No searching cookbooks or realizing - oops - I don't have that one item and no substitutes, either.) We tend not to think about "what's for dinner", until we're already hungry, as it is!

Because buying prepared grain products is going to be one the big things we'll miss, I'm going to be adding plenty of flours (that get rotated) and grains to grind or cook. (The prices are already starting to get rediculous for baked goods!) Dairy is the other one. In our situation, the freeze-dried or dehydrated products would best for LTStorage, as they're lighter and take up less space for more servings. But I hit the canned fruits and veggie sales, pretty hard too -- always check the BB dates and buy the ones dated further in the future. Lately, I've noticed the companies are starting to stretch those dates out a bit - currently buying 2015/2016 cans now. Guess they realized that they might sell more, if people think they can keep them in storage a little longer without any degradation in quality. Numerous threads here, have documented how the dates are more of a "guideline", than it will magically "go bad" on that date. With home canned items, I know we often ate 2 yr old stock, with no ill effects.

Thanks for the reminder on flat breads!! There are options for making various kinds of breads, without an oven - spoon bread, tortillas/naan, cornbread, etc.
11-18-2013 07:07 AM
grandma
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve marshall View Post
My thinking is that... you should be good to go if you have a garden and a few chickens. and chocolate And I bet you'd be able to acquire all this for little money on a weekly basis.
Added a bit right there...never forget the chocolate.
11-18-2013 06:57 AM
Krazy K
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
So what would you substitute for rice?
Vary white rice with long grain, brown ect.
11-18-2013 06:45 AM
steve marshall My thinking is that for the bulk required of foods:
Corn
Rice
Wheat
Beans
Pasta
Barley
Then add in canned goods to flesh things out:
Salmon
Tuna
Beef Stew
Luncheon Meat
Pasta
Chili
Then for a little comfort, canned:
Peaches
Pears
Pineapple
Mandarin Oranges
Throw in some spices:
Italian Seasoning
Garlic Powder
Onion Powder
Chili Powder
Salt
Add in some sugar, Baking Soda, Cream of Tartar, Grain Mill
You should be good to go if you have a garden and a few chickens. And I bet you'd be able to acquire all this for little money on a weekly basis.
11-17-2013 07:56 PM
CigarMan
Thanks!

This was a great thread, thanks for all the information!
11-13-2013 12:40 AM
Draqwraith
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
I could use a review and suggestions.

I am setting up 1 year's worth of food per person (Adult). I calculated 2000 calories per day which leads to 730,000 calories per person, per year. I went for long term storage stuff but you should know I am also canning and growing in my BRAND NEW GARDEN! (Yes I am very excited that my garden will very soon be expanded to almost 2 acres)

So, for very basic survival what do you all think of this?








Total calorie needs/person: 730,000 calories per person



White rice: 300 pounds per person (450,000 calories) -$0.3518 per pound ($105.54)

1 cup uncooked rice : 600 calories
2.5 cups per pound : 1500 calories per pound

Pinto Beans: 150 pounds per person: (210,000 calories) - $0.4198 per pound ($62.97)

1 cup uncooked pinto beans : 700 calories
2 cups dry beans per pound : 1400 calories

Black Beans: 25 pounds per person: (34.000) -$0.7952 per pound ($19.88)

1 cup uncooked black beans: 680 calories
2 cups dry beans per pound : 1360 calories

Honey: 5 pounds honey: (6750 calories) - $56.40 per pound ($282.00)

1 cup honey : 1000 calories
1 1/3 cups per pound: 1350 calories

Wheat: 100 pounds per person: (140,000 calories) - $1.00 per pound (wheatsales.com) ($100)

1 pound wheat: 1400 calories

Salt: 10 pounds per person - $0.1552 per pound ($1.55)

Sugar: 25 pounds per person - $0. 5796 per pound ($14.43)



Total Estimated food costs per person: $586.37
So far looks good except potable water. You should factor that in as well most beans need water to be cooked.
Spices for flavoring. Most beans are bland you will tire of it quickly.
11-12-2013 11:56 PM
willthrill81 First, let me say that I totally agree that variety is best for long-term eating.

That said, a large portion of the globe's population gets 70-80% (or more) of its calories from one staple food only right now. Corn and rice are the big food staples of the world.

Gardens are great, but many 'casual' preppers probably aren't aware that there aren't that many calories in typical garden fare produce. Two common food exceptions to this would be potatoes and corn.

Personally, I'm planning on us getting around 75% of our calories from primarily rice with some pasta and oats on the side, with the rest mostly coming from canned foods (i.e. baked beans, green beans, various fruits, etc.). Will this give us a 'He-Man' diet that a health food junky would envy? Would I recommend this diet to normal people on a regular basis who can afford better? No, but it will definitely keep us alive and reasonably healthy. Truth be told, more than 50% of the world's population would probably be better off if they ate this all the time.
11-12-2013 09:18 PM
Writer's Block I agree with a lot of what has been already posted:

Spices, stuff to add variety, other grains being subbed in, increase to 3000 cals, etc.

I also agree with stuff like adding some stuff like Peanut Butter and the like.


I would like to suggest things like Quinoa as a grain substitute. It is multipurpose and cooks basically like rice.

I would also suggest at least a limited amount of Instant Rice. Some times, the ease and speed of cooking will be a serious advantage, and it can also be cooked directly in the pan with most canned goods and sauces.


I really would stress the variety angle though. There is a reason they used to serve bland, repetitive, basic meals in prison...it may sound good to go "Hey, when you're hungry you'll eat it" but when you are stressed and such from both the event and the day to day living with the effects of it, good food can make all the difference.
11-12-2013 06:21 PM
goose3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prepaholic View Post
I just came across this thread. I'm surprised that in 2 and a half years no one spotted the math mistake.

The 25 pounds of sugar was not added into the calorie totals.

25 pounds of sugar has 43,875 calories. Not any nutriants, but will still burn.

This brings the grand total to 884,625 calories for the year (or 2,423 calories per day).
Kudos to you for searching around.

And as Mike says, they're empty calories, but as you say, they do burn. I have 50# of sugar stored, but more for sweetening and cooking and such, not as calories per se.
11-12-2013 05:44 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prepaholic View Post
I just came across this thread. I'm surprised that in 2 and a half years no one spotted the math mistake.

The 25 pounds of sugar was not added into the calorie totals.

25 pounds of sugar has 43,875 calories. Not any nutriants, but will still burn.

This brings the grand total to 884,625 calories for the year (or 2,423 calories per day).
That's probably because many of us recommend totalling food calories only, minus sugar and sweet drink mixes, etc.
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