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Thread: Storing enough seeds for your neighbors Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-08-2019 05:28 PM
PurpleKitty I don't think we will make it long term, we are such perfect victims. Hate to say it but there it is: we will be lucky to make it to 6 months.

I have planned for short term disasters as a result. I do have some seeds but not a whole lot.

My plan, SHTF, they come knocking on my door. IF I open it I will immediately ask them for food. If they see me as a Walmart they will simply come and take it, and I am not allowed to own a gun (mentally ill).

So rather than fight them off (I am pretty sure the ones I fear the most will simply go to the FEMA camp) I will present myself as a leech to them, demanding provision. They will run pretty quick.

NO ONE wants to be saddled with us.
10-08-2019 03:58 PM
RatRunner Some seeds can be had in such massive numbers that giving them to neighbors is simple. If you think about it buying a spice jar of celery seeds or mustard seeds gives you tens of thousands of seeds to use or give away. A bag of dry beans or whole dry peas gives you hundreds, (and perhaps a couple thousand), too.
10-07-2019 10:48 AM
catlady12 Old Fart, we have the same every spring! It’s been a big hit. The farmers markets also have seeds for sale.

Our neighbor grows corn but we do not. We grow pumpkin, squash, lots of beans, fruits and potatoes. My grandpa is the tomato and pepper master. We all share in harvest and and this seeds. We believe that if something happens to one persons stock of seeds, they have two sets to fall back on.
10-06-2019 09:04 AM
Fizbin Wow! That is one nice neighborhood!

Is this an older neighborhood with larger lots?
09-29-2019 03:07 AM
Old fart The neighborhood has a twice-a-year seed swap. It works like a Christmas cookie swap. Everyone brings X packages of one particular seed and everyone gets one of everything. Most people just put the seeds in little plastic baggies along with a piece of paper with what the seeds are to take to the swap and everyone then gets to store/repackage/use their seeds as they see fit.

Very experienced gardener down the block figures out how many seeds of each item and makes a sign-up list. Everyone signs up for one thing to bring (or two if they want more seeds for a bigger garden because then they'll get two packs of everything). The number of people signed up by the deadline is emailed out the day after the deadline so everyone knows how many packs of "their" seed to bring. Who's bringing what is also listed, so everyone knows what they'll get.

The swap is hosted by the experienced gardener and there's a class and Q&A, along with pizza. Everyone also gets a printed sheet with instructions for the seeds that everyone's bringing.

This year, bulbs have been added to the fall swap, so there'll be seeds and bulbs I've been told fall seeds are generally things that do well indoors, or take so long to grow that they have to be started indoors in the fall/by Christmas so they can be transplanted outside after the last frost the next spring to get any crop.

Pretty much everyone in the neighborhood goes (very lucrative night for the neighborhood teens babysitting the neighborhood children). Those that don't go are either too old or grow huge gardens that they take to sell at a farmer's market and share the overflow with everyone else. One of these trades a canning class at the student's house using the student's equipment and produce (garden or bought) Someone else is now doing this, too, as the first couldn't take care of everyone that wanted to learn or needed/wanted some help.

The working together thing has been growing (pun intended). This summer, a couple of people got invaded by some bug or another and they split the cost of the treatment, so that was a win-win Some of the neighbors are also going in together to get a big delivery of manure later on this fall to save $$$

The best part is getting to know the neighbors
09-26-2019 09:56 PM
Nomad, 2nd *warranty is autocorrected Amaranth
09-26-2019 09:19 PM
edprof I store quite a bit of seeds. I would like to be able to survive one or two crop failures and still be able to plant a garden. "Garden" to me is over 5,000 square feet.

Having that many seed may translate into having some for my neighbors. Wait and see.
09-26-2019 11:45 AM
Nomad, 2nd
Quote:
Originally Posted by recklessdriver View Post
Because owning seeds equals its going to grow into a huge food source?

A solid garden takes minimum 3 years to figure out what grows well and doesn't. This mythical prepper novel of tossing seeds into the ground and six months later you have a abundance of food is a myth.

Your neighbor wont care and will just kill you for your food.

More of my neighbors garden than don't.

But they buy seed.

I have identified a local herlum "plant and forget till harvest" cowpea that I'm helping keep alive.

And working on warranty and sorgum.
My intent is to "scatter them around" so they grow on their own in addition to my growing for seed
09-23-2019 10:58 PM
Mazarine33
Quote:
Originally Posted by recklessdriver View Post
Because owning seeds equals its going to grow into a huge food source?

A solid garden takes minimum 3 years to figure out what grows well and doesn't. This mythical prepper novel of tossing seeds into the ground and six months later you have a abundance of food is a myth.

Your neighbor wont care and will just kill you for your food.
Then you kill him first. Pre emptive strike. Then SSS and maintain your opsecs.
09-23-2019 03:57 PM
st0n3
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
Anyone ever consider storing enough seeds for neighbors?
Every time I eat a watermelon, I save all the seed.
When I plant sweet corn and green beans / cow peas, there is always an abundance of mature seed at the end of the season... far more than I will ever use in my garden... Likewise, the turnip and rutabaga and kale.

While the chickens and cats do eat seeds... I still have jars and jars full of seed that will get too old to germinate long before I eventually clean house and toss them...

Quote:
Originally Posted by lasers View Post
If a person did want to store seeds for their neighbors, what would you store? In my area pumpkins and tomatoes and some peppers will literately grow them self's. All you have to do is not mow them over and they will produce.
Always a good idea to encourage landrace crops... The more edibles that I grow, which don't need to put effort into... the better.

Takes more effort in my area to find cultivars that self sow while tolerating the drought / humidity that are a normal part of gardening in the sandhills... but... when I find something that wants to grow... I totally make room for it.
09-22-2019 10:00 PM
roseman We save many times the amount needed for our own use and give away some as requested to friends and neighbors.
09-22-2019 09:58 PM
barnetmill
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasers View Post
If a person did want to store seeds for their neighbors, what would you store? In my area pumpkins and tomatoes and some peppers will literately grow them self's. All you have to do is not mow them over and they will produce. Most types of beans will also grow with very little maintenance as long as you can keep the weeds down for the first couple weeks of their growth. I think, wheat, rye, and oats will grow on their own quite well if you broadcast them over you lawn thick enough.

I can't think of much else that can be stored as seeds that require almost no care and will produce food a single season after planting.
I second the bean type plants and they are nutritious. Tomatoes can be difficult, but peppers will grow.
I plan for myself to try out root crops like peanuts, sweet potatoes, and others. But sweet potatoes and some of the others are not generally planted as seeds.
09-22-2019 09:47 PM
lasers If a person did want to store seeds for their neighbors, what would you store? In my area pumpkins and tomatoes and some peppers will literately grow them self's. All you have to do is not mow them over and they will produce. Most types of beans will also grow with very little maintenance as long as you can keep the weeds down for the first couple weeks of their growth. I think, wheat, rye, and oats will grow on their own quite well if you broadcast them over you lawn thick enough.

I can't think of much else that can be stored as seeds that require almost no care and will produce food a single season after planting.
09-22-2019 09:41 PM
barnetmill There one recurrent issue that is raised and that is that assuming the neighbors actually plant the seeds, will they be successful.
What can be done to help them be successful. First relative to the donated seeds is start with cultivars that will do well under my and their conditions that should be similar. After that it depends on exactly how much time and material do I want to invest. Will I use my equipment to break up the sod of their back yards? Sites over the septic tanks fields will likely be good gardening sites. Will I help them take down shading trees etc.
09-22-2019 09:32 PM
lasers I don't have near enough money, time or space to prep all the things I need/want for my intimidate family. I couldn't imagine trying to store stuff for my neighbors.

The only exception to that that I have thought I may do is to store ears of dried field corn. Then if there ever is a true SHTF that affects the area and makes food scarce I would empty my kitchen of all other food.

That way if someone comes asking or demanding food I can show them my cupboards are bare too and that all we are eating is corn. Then I can offer them a few ears, tell them how to grind it between a couple bricks and boil it into mush. That way I could protect my food, make them think I am almost as bad off as them and give them something.
09-22-2019 09:24 PM
rlp2
I choose to help.

I have stored away seeds for my neighbors. They are all of varieties known to grow well in my area, open pollinated or heirloom, and are carefully desiccated and sealed away in mason jars in a deep freezer. They will be viable long after I'm gone. I have enough seeds in storage to plant 20 large gardens, which happens to match the number of neighbors that I have nearby.

My faith requires me to help my neighbors in times of need. I am not given the option to turn away friends and neighbors when I have the capacity and resources to help them. Obviously, I cannot be expected to feed twenty families - there is no way I could afford to purchase and store all that food for an indefinite period of time, but enough seed for 20 gardens does not cost much and, if properly prepared, is easy to process and store for extremely long periods of time. I look at it as a compromise. I may not be able to feed 20 families, but I can certainly help them to feed themselves.

We all know, by examining history, that food is often used as a weapon against people. It happened to the Kulaks in Russia, the Armenians in Turkey, the Jews in Germany, and even here in the America's during the Revolutionary and Civil wars. It has happened before and it will happen again. Scripture warns us that food will be used as a weapon during the end times, when the State will determine who eats and who dies.

When the chips are down and everything is going against you, having a couple of pounds of seeds can often make the difference between hope and despair, health and disease, life and death.

Yes, I agree, most people don't know how to garden today. Building a good garden with good soil takes hard work, knowledge, experience, and time. But does the lack of one or more of these factors mean that we shouln't even try? Are we to give up simply because the work is hard and the odds are against us? My neighbors may not have all these things, but they do have adequate amounts of land, reasonably good soil, my seed, and my knowledge and experience. That must count for something. It may be rough going for the first year or two, but with perseverance and hard work, we have a better chance of surviving than if we simply gave up and did nothing. Besides, gardening will give the community a focus and something to do, which will help in times of stress, uncertainty, and adversity.

Helping one's neighbors certainly does imply the presence of risk. Working with other people under adverse circumstances is always risky, especially so when they are tired and desperate and hungry. Yes, they might invite family over (who wouldn't?). Yes, they might covet your food, and want to take it. Yes, they might even decide to take your life and everything you've worked on for years. The thing to remember here is that nobody gets off this planet alive. Everybody dies at some point, sooner or later, so looking at things from the long point of view may sometimes be useful. If I am destined to die while trying to help my neighbors in a difficult situation then I will at least be able to stand before my Creator in the knowledge that I was, in fact, doing what He told me to do. I will then leave the whole mess in His hands and go find something else to do. In the end I can't and won't stand before my Creator and have to explain why I didn't or couldn't help when such help was so easy to provide, and especially in the face of His explicitly adverse command.

There are those who will think that I might be neglecting my own family by offering to share seed. Not so. long term seed storage is only one facet of my preparations. My family has already been (I hope) adequately provided for, and my contribution to my neighbors well-being, I believe, actually contributes to my families prospects of success and survival.

There are no easy paths here. All paths involve risk and peril and are fraught with danger from many different directions. Some choose to hide their resources and training and capabilities out of fear, abandoning their neighbors to whatever the fates may dictate. In so doing they also fail to realize the possible rewards and benefits in long-term cooperation with others, and lose out on those rewards and benefits in the end. I, on the other hand, feel that the greatest probability of long-term success includes the willing help and cooperation of my neighbors, so I can't go this direction. I choose to help my neighbors, and I choose to do what my Lord told me to do.
09-22-2019 09:09 PM
Florida Jean I have pondered this.

For you folks up north -- it might be moot as 'whatever' happens at the wrong time of the year for planting. Example, it is already September 22nd. What can be planted in your area that can be harvested before the second front [am assuming you could cover stuff for the first frost which is often light]? And when can you finally start planting in the spring? Who will still be around? Or physically able to do gardening?

Now, this is start of fall gardening for us. [and the end of the second corn planting season for FLA].

I know whom among my neighbors already garden [even if they just spring garden, flower garden, container garden, veggie garden [as opposed to root gardening].] So I would take them into consideration first.

I have also contemplated neighbors with nice 'sun lite' areas in their backyards. Easier for them to hid/protect. So -- they are a good seed give-to should I so decide.

The later winter garden and the spring garden is the dry season. If whomever doesn't have a functioning well or a close pond, and isn't willing to haul the water why give them seeds?

Plus, I wouldn't mind giving seeds in exchange for someone doing a little water hauling for me during the dry season.

One of my worries about the seed issue -- is that if people are really hungry they are going to eat everything and not let any of their plants go to seed for their next planting. Am I going to be the seed producer for everyone?

I wouldn't mind handing out seeds to someone I trusted on the deal that I'd get 'x' amount of their crop for my eating. And then keep producing seed on my property. But I got to eat too.
09-22-2019 09:07 PM
two bits
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
So you are saying invite over so they do not come take what you have. If that is the case inviting them over can put them off their guard and give you a tactical advantage.
I was being sarcastic.

But the advantage should be, how everybody can work together. You grow a garden, and they can do what, to support you?

Its, you scratching their back and they yours.
09-22-2019 08:28 PM
Henrykjr Honestly it's a great idea and pretty easy to get your neighbors involved in. Lowes sells a City Pickers self watering container for $20 or so.....this make it super easy to grow basic veggie....spring mix and cherry tomatoes are a virtual layup with these containers.

One you feed a couple of Cherry tomatoes to you neighbors they will be hooked. This is the introduction to growing you will need with a little encouragement in the spring " hey what are you planting this month?"

My seed source is Ohio Heirloom Seeds they have the best variety and highest quality seeds I can find.

Ultimately in the event of an emergency you are going to want your neighbors to have some skills.

Having seed for them.....even if you give them a few here and there during the year is a great insurance policy.

Nobody needs to know you are a prepper.

HK
09-22-2019 07:52 PM
recklessdriver Because owning seeds equals its going to grow into a huge food source?

A solid garden takes minimum 3 years to figure out what grows well and doesn't. This mythical prepper novel of tossing seeds into the ground and six months later you have a abundance of food is a myth.

Your neighbor wont care and will just kill you for your food.
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