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Thread: Southeast Michigan, Pond's Edge Homestead & Garden 2014 - 2019 Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-15-2019 05:14 PM
inMichigan Winter solstice coming...looking forward to the days growing longer!

Been threshing, cleaning, sorting and threshing.... seeds everywhere!

Neither of us smoke, but we grew several types of tobacco here in Michigan. You can order a wide range of seeds, but nearly all are targeting regions with a longer season than we have. Of course those more famous types would make plants, they just wouldn't make viable seeds, therefore, not sustainable in our minds.

Here is a beautiful one that didn't quite make it before the frost got them:


These little Petite Canadian Tobacco did just fine:


I hung some leaves from each type:


Has anybody 'processed' tobacco for home use? I talked to some friends who helped farmers when they were growing up 40 years ago... it all got sent out in bales, so, neither knew what the secret to processing is.

One variety has small round seed pods:
https://photos.smugmug.com/BackyardM..._163850-X2.jpg

When threshing the seed pods, you get this kind of clean residue:


You get a huge amount of seeds:


The internet says half a million seeds per ounce!

I will give some samples to a colleague who smokes for testing.

Thoughts and experiences?
inMichigan



PS I did some internet & thread searching... the word 'tobacco' appears far too often.

First, there are two kinds of tobacco:
Tobacco Rustica--extremely high in nicotine which makes it the one to use for bugs
Nicotiana tabacum-this is the used for smoking these days of which there are many, many varieties

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...t=cure+tobacco

and an older thread
https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...d.php?t=289721

My feeling from reading is that there are two phases: a) after picking and hanging, getting the leaf to turn from green to yellow which you seem to want to happen slowly but without mold, b) drying with good airflow; all followed by some amount of aging. Also, the commercial processes are not not widely known due to secret details... and the home process may require a few attempts to get the knack right.

This was a nice write up about using it for bugs:
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiprepper View Post
A few folks have pointed out that tobacco can be used as a natural pesticide. So, for those of you tending your own gardens I found this simple guide for anyone who might be interested.


1) Steep a cup of dry tobacco in a gallon of water for at least half an hour. Soaking for longer produces a stronger pesticide, and some gardeners leave the tobacco mixture to soak for a day. Stronger pesticides might work faster, but they are also more dangerous to beneficial garden insects.

2) Add a squirt of dish washing liquid to the mixture. This improves the spreadability of the pesticide and is mildly toxic to some pests in its own right.

3) Strain the liquid into plastic storage containers, through a fine sieve, to remove the tobacco pieces. Tighten the lids securely. The pesticide will keep for a couple of weeks if stored somewhere cool, for example, in a garage or basement.

4) Transfer the mixture to a plant mister.

5) Target the pests and use as little spray as possible. For example, spray growing shoots that are thickly covered in aphids but not nearby, aphid-free leaves. Tobacco spray is natural but still dangerous to useful insects, such as ladybugs.

Adding dishwashing soap helps the solution stick to the plant surfaces, and it also has pest killing properties of its own.

Do not use a tobacco pesticide on plants in the tobacco family, Solanaceae. These include tomato, potato and pepper plants. Tobacco may carry the tobacco mosaic virus that could be much more of a problem than the pests.


07-29-2019 04:25 PM
inMichigan
Quote:
Originally Posted by vivisky View Post
That's what I'm thinking too---tons of "tillers" or branches....this all comes from ONE rice seed? Amazing.

I use a lot of mulch in my garden too, so I wonder if the Upland Rice varieties can be grown that way too.
Yep, just one seed.
07-29-2019 04:15 PM
inMichigan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
That's some amazing amount of growth from each seed, particularly the Loto. Squeaky clean beds, too! Weeds down here just wait for you to go back to the house after weeding so more can start overnight.

Do you think upland rice would mind having a mulch? I have checked and the only nematode that affects rice is in Asia and some parts of Europe and is also a different species than the RKN here. This makes upland rice a possibility for growing over the summer in otherwise fallow beds to starve RKNs.
Weeds, here too, but I am artful in my photo compositions....

We have mulched with strips of newspaper torn to width and grass clippings to hold it down. We did that once tillering had begun for smaller beds. With mulch comes a lot of snails and slugs. I chose to not mulch, as I am trying raise it like I would if scaled up for “food” mode. A friend gets 10 pounds per 100 sq ft.

InMichigan
07-29-2019 01:42 PM
vivisky
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
That's some amazing amount of growth from each seed, particularly the Loto. Squeaky clean beds, too! Weeds down here just wait for you to go back to the house after weeding so more can start overnight.

Do you think upland rice would mind having a mulch? I have checked and the only nematode that affects rice is in Asia and some parts of Europe and is also a different species than the RKN here. This makes upland rice a possibility for growing over the summer in otherwise fallow beds to starve RKNs.
That's what I'm thinking too---tons of "tillers" or branches....this all comes from ONE rice seed? Amazing.

I use a lot of mulch in my garden too, so I wonder if the Upland Rice varieties can be grown that way too.
07-28-2019 05:24 PM
Weedinhoe That's some amazing amount of growth from each seed, particularly the Loto. Squeaky clean beds, too! Weeds down here just wait for you to go back to the house after weeding so more can start overnight.

Do you think upland rice would mind having a mulch? I have checked and the only nematode that affects rice is in Asia and some parts of Europe and is also a different species than the RKN here. This makes upland rice a possibility for growing over the summer in otherwise fallow beds to starve RKNs.
07-28-2019 02:16 PM
inMichigan The Duborskian Rice has begun to bloom:






Loto Rice appears to be the most happy this year. All this growth from a single seed!


Each 'stalk' called a tiller will likely form a head of grain.

Finally, it puts Crab Grass to shame!
07-16-2019 10:37 PM
vivisky I can't argue with your success! but just wonder....have you read Eliot Coleman's books? he grows onions, beets, etc with 3-4 seeds per block, and Yes this is not the "recommended way" to do it. However, it makes for easier handling. I just wonder with the rice, if you did 3-4 seeds in a block, if it would save you time.
My idea to do the 7-12 seeds in a quart pot would be for home garden---not a larger plot obviously!
07-13-2019 10:26 AM
inMichigan
upland rice

Quote:
Originally Posted by vivisky View Post
...so transplants will be best, I'm thinking 1 qt pots with 7-12 seeds each and starting more than 3 wks before setting out.
I would not use a pot with multiple seedlings. The young plants' roots are delicate, I'm concerned about the damage to the roots as you take them apart.

I would recommend individual 'cell' type trays, like this:


You can see the seedlings are a little bit yellow...as rice does not enjoy being in a pot/cell. If I were to plant more than 3 or 4 flats, I would stagger starting the seeds by a few days so that they don't all reach the 'must plant' stage at the same time.

Those are 7 by 12 cells per flat. At this stage of transplanting on May 18th, almost every 'plant' was gently popped out without falling apart. If you had some from previous tomatoes/peppers, I'd try them, however, I'm not sure the larger 'cell size' would be of benefit. If the cell was too big, I don't think there would be enough 'roots' to hold it together during handling. Also, we are constrained by how many square feet of tray we can illuminate, so, density is a winner for us.



They got a small 'drink' of water after transplanting, one by one (to avoid waking up all the weed seeds!):


Here they are on July 12th.


Bed widths of 3 to 4 feet sound good, as that is handy for weeding. In this last photo, in the far ground, are the transplants. In the foreground, the same type of rice was direct seeded. Notice the direct seeded stand is not as dense. I would have had to use a lot more seed to account for germination, accidents during weeding, birds and the weather.


inMichigan
07-08-2019 11:25 AM
vivisky Fascinating to learn rice can be grown in Northern areas! Will have to try this, we are zone 3b/4a so transplants will be best, I'm thinking 1 qt pots with 7-12 seeds each and starting more than 3 wks before setting out. I grow everything in 3-4 ft wide beds. Can't wait for next season! Thanks for the inspiration -- am so excited!
07-07-2019 09:08 PM
inMichigan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
They're really pretty! But you're right in that they sure look like crab grass. How tall are the sets before you plant them out? And what's your in row spacing?
They were 2 to 3 inches when transplanted. I do 9 inch row spacing so that I can run my wheel how thru and tend to space 9 inches in the row as well.

They are starting to develop a canopy and shade out little weeds.

InMichigan
07-07-2019 09:57 AM
roseman
Quote:
Originally Posted by inMichigan View Post
Rain, wet, rain, ... is this going to be like the year without a summer?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer

Funny though, when a couple of weeks go by with hot temps and no rain, you get to thinking some rain might be nice.
07-07-2019 09:52 AM
Weedinhoe
Quote:
Originally Posted by inMichigan View Post
They grow slowly at first when direct seeded and look a lot like crab grass, so, early weeding is a nightmare. Starting indoors and transplanting is a great way to get a jump on the weeds.
inMichigan
They're really pretty! But you're right in that they sure look like crab grass. How tall are the sets before you plant them out? And what's your in row spacing?
07-06-2019 10:40 PM
inMichigan Even here in Michigan, rice is a staple crop that can be grown. There are two kinds of rice: paddy (like you're probably thinking about) and upland. Paddy needs a period of 'flooding' which doesn't work so well if you don't have a lot of water. I don't know anybody growing paddy rice, yet. However, upland rice grows essentially like wheat or barley. We've grown it for several years, selecting seeds from the strongest plants.

There are many varieties to choose from... such as https://www.sherckseeds.com/seeds/grains/rice/ however, be mindful of how many 'frost free' growing days you really have.

This one is Zerawchanica Rice:


This one is Loto Rice:


It's said that the yields can be 10 pounds of rice per 100 sq foot. We'll see what we get. There are really only two downsides to rice:
a) They grow slowly at first when direct seeded and look a lot like crab grass, so, early weeding is a nightmare. Starting indoors and transplanting is a great way to get a jump on the weeds.
b) The seeds have a 'hull' that must be removed before eating. There are various methods of dehulling mentioned on the internet. Most are not perfect, but are sufficient for homestead use.

inMichigan
06-20-2019 10:00 PM
roseman It's been challenging so far.
06-20-2019 08:39 PM
inMichigan Rain, wet, rain, ... is this going to be like the year without a summer?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer
05-06-2019 09:48 AM
citykittyatheart
Quote:
Originally Posted by inMichigan View Post
no TV in the house....
That's funny! I pulled my cable just over one year ago and when my TV puked out, didn't replace it. Don't miss it. I have plenty to do and streaming on my tablet is much cheaper anyway! Not to mention no commercials.
02-08-2019 07:05 PM
inMichigan We've been planting Tennessee Red Valencia Peanut for several generations here in SE Michigan. These are some of the seeds I've selected for direct seeding this Spring:



Peanuts are a staple crop that provides a nice source of protein and calories if you don't have any allergies. They also can fix nitrogen for free fertilizer.

inMichigan
01-24-2019 09:12 PM
vivisky
Quote:
Originally Posted by inMichigan View Post
Took the ground cherries that were stored in the barn and DW made two different batches of Jam.... delicious. These are "Goldie" ground cherries. We'll definitely be growing them again.

Always store your ground cherries with the husks on, they last longer that way.



Remove the hulls:



Following this recipe for the "pectin" batch (http://www.cooks.com/recipe/dl8ob4tc...erry-jam.html)
3 c. ripe ground cherries
1/4 c. lemon juice (or Real Lemon)
1/2 c. water
1 pkg. Sure-Jel
3 c. sugar
To a quart saucepan, add ground cherries, lemon, water, and Sure-Jel. Bring cherries to a boil and mash them. Be sure they are all mashed so they'll absorb the sugar. Add sugar. Boil according to directions on Sure-Jel package. This will make 3 medium jars of jam.


Following this recipe for the without pectin batch ( http://www.cooks.com/recipe/w0j80z8/...herry-jam.html )
5 c. berries
1/2 c. water
4 c. sugar
1/2 can (6 oz. size) frozen orange juice
4 tbsp. lemon juice
Remove husks and wash berries. Measure berries and water. Bring to boil and cook until berries burst. Add sugar and can frozen orange juice concentrate, not diluted and lemon juice. Cook for 30 minutes stirring often to prevent scorching. Jar and seal.


Cooking:


On the way to the water bath canner:


Of course, there was a bit that was set aside for 'testing'....



inMichigan
I am so tickled to see your ground cherries! I grow those too! mostly for fresh eating, but also make jam, I like to add some grated fresh ginger for extra zing!
01-24-2019 08:42 PM
vivisky
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerChad View Post
Good morning! Glad to see your still hanging in there. Always enjoy reading your posts. I usually dont have anything to add, cause you clearly know what the hell your doing. And I dont..
Farmer Chad, you **do** know what you are doing, on tons of points! Be proud of all you do, and learn from the mistakes. That's the only way anybody gets it in the end.
01-22-2019 08:58 PM
inMichigan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
You sure run across some neat stuff!
no TV in the house....
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