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Thread: Respiratory Protection for Airborne Exposures to Biohazards Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-29-2020 11:52 AM
NHCraigT Good Info (including pictures) on how to identify (and avoid) counterfeit masks:

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/user...rfeitResp.html

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npptl/user...ionalTips.html
04-28-2020 05:12 PM
ImStillHere Well I was down to my last few masks in my responder bag and opened up my medical drum storage. I didn't realize what a great deal I got on these, They are about 2 years old stored in a drum and in the garage. I will update if I have any elastic issues.

04-16-2020 03:52 PM
paladinFL It's not about protecting ourselves, its about them controlling. Remember that Liberals "never let a crisis go to waste"
03-25-2020 04:19 AM
dmas On another thread safety glasses were kind of described as better than nothing for infection control. That is correct according to cdc. Indirect vented goggles are needed and described here along with other eye protection.
https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/eye...nfectious.html
03-24-2020 11:52 PM
clingmansdome Any prepper should research how infectious diseases spread, since if there's catastrophe that overwhelms medical facilities, every person is responsible for ensuring their ability to stay healthy and productive, and prevention is much better than cure.
Having a large stock of surgical gloves, N95 respirators and industrial filter masks is a wise prep for the flu season every year. Face shields, goggles, and a HAZMAT suit or two is just a common sense prep. When I read about people dying when a ammonia railroad car crashed, I bought an oxygen mask and a tank big enough to keep me going for an hour so I could survive some kind of airborne threat.
All the food and fuel in the world won't do you any good if you can't move because of sickness, or you croak because something hazardous goes airborne.
03-24-2020 11:23 PM
clingmansdome Lots has been written on this topic. Viruses like H1N1 and covid19 are usually broadcast through respiratory droplets, since the viruses have evolved to infect and inhabit the human respiratory system. When a person sneezes, coughs, blows their nose, spits, or in some way ejects respiratory droplets, the droplets will carry the virus. If someone inhales the droplets or the droplets get into someone's eyes, the virus can inhabit the person's respiratory tract and reproduce, which can lead to symptoms that are common to the viral infection.
You don't necessarily have to filter out the virus, as long as you can filter out the respiratory droplets that carry the virus. I wear safety glasses that seal around my eyes to protect them from the virus, and I use an N95 mask that is well fitted, to protect my nose and mouth.
Since a person can transport the virus from their hands to their eyes, nose, or mouth, wearing gloves and/or washing hands thoroughly is also necessary.
Also, when a person sneezes, coughs, or in some other way broadcasts respiratory droplets, the concentration of droplets lessens as the distance from the broadcasting orifice increases, in a manner that is similar to the inverse square law. In other words, if the concentration of droplets is X at distance Y from the broadcasting orifice, if the distance Y is doubled, the concentration X decreases by a factor of four. If distance Y is quadrupled, then concentration X becomes about X/16.
There have been studies done at the CDC to determine how long a certain type of virus can survive if its respiratory droplet lands on different materials. Basically, you should assume that anything you touch in an infected area contains live virus capable of infecting your respiratory tract, which is why wearing gloves and washing your hands is so important.
Best practice is to stay away from infected places and people. If you can't do that, wear mouth, nose, eye and hand protection, and if you hear someone cough or sneeze, move rapidly in the opposite direction to increase distance and decrease droplet concentration. It's also important to know that respiratory droplets are very small and can be transported on air currents over fairly long distances, so if you're in a Walmart and you hear someone cough, the store's ventilation system can carry them to you if the air currents lead in your direction.
03-24-2020 09:35 PM
dmas My surgical nurse niece says they get fit tested for n95 masks every year. They have a hood over your masked head and introduce an odorant. I f you don't smell anything fit is ok.
Fit is very important and bad fit is a major reason n95 masks are not recommended for the general public. Looking at pictures you see many medical personnel with badly fitted masks, actual visible gaps between mask and face.
03-22-2020 11:45 PM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by augoldminer View Post
I use a ozone generator on my Cpap mask and hoses and the elastic has not been hurt over 6 months of use.

Most bandanas may be just as good as a N95 mask and seal better if you tie a knot for below the chin.
I doubt your CPAP mask and hose are made of Polypropylene.
Most plastics are quite hardy with respect to UV and ozone, but Polyproylene fails much faster. Add to that the fact that the fibers in a mask are quite small diameter, and more susceptable to surface attack.

Lastly, your mask and hose are likely treated with some chemical soup of plasticizer, UV stabilizer, free radical traps, etc.

i would have to look up the reason why PP is so susceptible to attack, but it is.

I had a cheap bucket made of the stuff on my boat, under the seat in mostly shade.

At the end of the season I decided to take it off the boat. I grabbed for ir and all I got was a handful of crumbs smaller than grains of sand.

It was amazing. It still was standing there, looking like a bucket, yet it was not strong enough to lift its own weight. Several more attempts to very gently pick it up so I could throw it away without making a mess failed. Each time it would disintegrate further until it was just a pile of crumbs for me to sweep up.

Now I am sure that bucket would still function like a bucket for a month or two. But at some point it became a bucket shaped mirage.

I have had lots of polypropylene fails over the years. Lawn chair webbing, rope, sail ties, Probably cheap bungee cords, etc.

Hard to say when it will fail exactly. But it will look just fine and dandy one day, and then completely fall apart.

Here is an article I found on a quick search.

https://www.servicethread.com/blog/t...ster-explained

I tend to equate UV exposure with ozone exposure, which may or may not be valid. I think it sort of is, but haven't dived that deep into it.

https://www.craftechind.com/top-8-ozone-safe-plastics/

Looking up what type of plastic is used in CPAP hoses, all I found was it is either PP or PE.

"Composition: Standard PAP hoses are typically made from materials like polypropylene or polyethylene"
03-22-2020 11:23 PM
augoldminer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
Ozone will destroy the elastic and also degrade the mask material. No way to know when it has lost its efficacy. Might get lucky once or twice.

Heat or alcohol I think would preserve the material better and still kill the bugs.
I use a ozone generator on my Cpap mask and hoses and the elastic has not been hurt over 6 months of use.

Most bandanas may be just as good as a N95 mask and seal better if you tie a knot for below the chin.
03-21-2020 03:25 PM
ForumSurvivalist
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
Fact not in evidence.

UV destroys polypropylene over repeated exposure.
I appreciate the correction. I'm not sure what that level of reuse is (probably less than 10) but I am sure they know of the destruction of polypropylene by UV light and consider it minimal for their conditions.
03-21-2020 12:48 AM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForumSurvivalist View Post
Hospitals reusing masks. Disinfecting with UV light!

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/h...sks-reuse.html


/QUOTE/

No one thinks reuse of face masks is ideal, and the practice may raise legal liability issues. But there seemed to be little choice.

Doctors and administrators at the University of Nebraska Medical Center calculated that if they continued to use masks only once, they would run out of masks in just weeks.

“We are making the best of bad choices,” said Dr. Mark Rupp, the medical center’s chief of infectious diseases.

He feels confident that the masks will still protect health care workers. “The data is very clear that you can kill and inactivate viruses with UV germicidal irradiation,” he said. “It is also very clear that you will not damage the respirators.”

The alternative, Dr. Lowe said, would be to ask health care workers to carefully store their masks and reuse them without cleaning them. Handling a mask repeatedly also increases the chances that it will be contaminated.
Fact not in evidence.

UV destroys polypropylene over repeated exposure.
03-20-2020 09:29 PM
ForumSurvivalist Hospitals reusing masks. Disinfecting with UV light!

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/h...sks-reuse.html


/QUOTE/

No one thinks reuse of face masks is ideal, and the practice may raise legal liability issues. But there seemed to be little choice.

Doctors and administrators at the University of Nebraska Medical Center calculated that if they continued to use masks only once, they would run out of masks in just weeks.

“We are making the best of bad choices,” said Dr. Mark Rupp, the medical center’s chief of infectious diseases.

He feels confident that the masks will still protect health care workers. “The data is very clear that you can kill and inactivate viruses with UV germicidal irradiation,” he said. “It is also very clear that you will not damage the respirators.”

The alternative, Dr. Lowe said, would be to ask health care workers to carefully store their masks and reuse them without cleaning them. Handling a mask repeatedly also increases the chances that it will be contaminated.
03-09-2020 03:13 PM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrayFoal2 View Post
What if you put a used (assumed to be contaminated) N95 mask in a box with a ozone generator for a few hours? Would it be virus-free and usable again?
Ozone will destroy the elastic and also degrade the mask material. No way to know when it has lost its efficacy. Might get lucky once or twice.

Heat or alcohol I think would preserve the material better and still kill the bugs.
03-09-2020 02:10 PM
GrayFoal2 What if you put a used (assumed to be contaminated) N95 mask in a box with a ozone generator for a few hours? Would it be virus-free and usable again?
03-09-2020 01:21 PM
nextup
Quote:
Originally Posted by Royd View Post
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/scie...tance-and-stay

Not sure if anyone follows SCMP but this was just on their website
you should've added the article head line... most people will just gloss over links posted without that..

"Coronavirus can travel twice as far as official ‘safe distance’ and stay in air for 30 minutes, Chinese study finds"

key takeaways from those infected on the bus...

" Covid-19 can linger in the air for at least 30 minutes and travel up to 4.5 metres – further than the “safe distance” advised by health authorities around the world"

"The scientists warned that the coronavirus could survive more than five days in human faeces or bodily fluids."

"one patient, who was not wearing a mask, was likely to have inhaled aerosols, or tiny particles, breathed out by the infected passengers from the previous group."

"Our advice is to wear a face mask all the way [through the bus ride],” they added.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cityboy613 View Post
Im not trying to stir up a fight. But mayor bill de blasio was just on CNN saying the virus dos not hang in the air and dies very quick on surfaces. I was under the impression it lasted days on surfaces. Now Im a bit confused.
there are links to article's further back in the thread where it's been reported that this virus can live on surfaces up to 9 day's, as far as how long it can remain airborne? here are a few articles on that and also how far a sneeze or cough travel and remain suspended..

Studying the Science of 100 Sneezes << from MIT...

https://alum.mit.edu/slice/studying-science-100-sneezes

In the cloud: How coughs and sneezes float farther than you think
Novel study uncovers the way coughs and sneezes stay airborne for long distances. << and another from MIT...

http://news.mit.edu/2014/coughs-and-sneezes-float-fart

Here’s How Fast and Far a Sneeze Can Carry Contagious Germs. << Health Line...

https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...ntagious-germs


How far do coughs and sneezes travel? << Science Focus...
Coughs and sneezes spread diseases, and you’ll definitely want to cover your mouth after reading this.

https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-hum...neezes-travel/


take away from the combined article's, droplets from a cough or sneeze can travel 16 to 26 feet and close to 100 mph, the smaller droplets can remain suspended in the air up to 10 or so mins in a gaseous cloud and can get sucked into a ventilation system and redistributed into other rooms or get spread out further in a larger room depending how many vent's are in that room..

also, in other report's, the virus has been found in feces, and there's a chance of possible infection from flushing the toilet with the lid up, from a few studies flushing the toilet can cause a virus or bacteria to be expelled in a gaseous form 2.5 to 3 feet in the air and up to 10 feet away from said toilet.. which can contaminate counter tops and possible door handle's in a bathroom...

^^^ moved these over from the mega thread so the info doesn't get buried..
03-03-2020 01:10 PM
ScottsBad Very useful information. Also, ^ the post above is quite helpful.

BTW - 103 C is 217.4 F

Thank you
03-03-2020 09:54 AM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steverino View Post
Link?

I googled "temp required to kill a flu virus".... and I got back 121C (121 °Celsius = 249.8 °Fahrenheit)

I googled "What is the average temperature of a hairdryer?".... and I got back 130 to 150 °Fahrenheit


¯\_(ツ)_/¯
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2828525

"The efficacy of two heating cycles (90 sec at 103 degrees C and 10 hr at 65 degrees C (149 deg F)) used during manufacture of a plasma-derived hepatitis-B vaccine was validated for the inactivation of 12 virus families. A period of 15 min warming up to 65 degrees C had already completely inactivated representatives of nine virus families, ie, poxvirus (vaccinia), picornavirus (encephalomyocarditis virus), togavirus (sindbis virus), coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus), orthomyxovirus (influenza virus), rhabdovirus (vesicular stomatitis virus), herpes virus (cytomegalovirus), lentivirus (human immunodeficiency virus), and retrovirus (murine leukemia virus).

After prolonged heating at 65 degrees C or heating for 90 sec at 103 degrees C, parvovirus (canine parvovirus) and the phage phiX174 were also completely inactivated. Papovavirus represented by simian virus 40 (SV-40) was the most heat-resistant virus evaluated. "
03-03-2020 12:47 AM
Freja My daughter is a nurse at Kaiser in Ca. There are no masks for nurses only Dr.’s and they are kept under lock and key.

They don’t even have the cheap ones. Where did they all go? What were they thinking?

Kaiser has been put under “lockdown” this morning. It is unfortunate that the news doesn’t keep the public updated so that we may better protect ourselves.
03-03-2020 12:46 AM
Steverino Link?

I googled "temp required to kill a flu virus".... and I got back 121C (121 °Celsius = 249.8 °Fahrenheit)

I googled "What is the average temperature of a hairdryer?".... and I got back 130 to 150 °Fahrenheit


¯\_(ツ)_/¯
03-03-2020 12:35 AM
Freja On February 9th 2020, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, Ministry of Education / Medical Molecular Virology Laboratory of Health Committee and School of Public Health together published a scientific research paper "Experimental research on safe and rapid regeneration of disposable medical masks". It was published in the Journal of Microbiology and Infection online version. The research paper confirmed that disposable medical masks could be disinfected by using following method: After using the mask, it can be wrapped with household fresh-keeping bags and treated with household electric hair dryer for 30 minutes. After that it can be used again. This method doesn’t affect masks original filter retention effect, and the contaminated viruses are inactivated!
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