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Thread: Best Location in House for 10# fire extinguisher? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-24-2014 07:54 AM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldBlackWater View Post
It's nice to see some folks on this board still have a sense of humor.

Hell we are all going to die, might as well get some laughs in before we go!

.
I got news, you never got to go!
01-24-2014 03:28 AM
TMcArthur Kitchen. Overwhelmingly where most home fires begin. Garage would be number two.

If it is difficult getting to the extinguisher you shouldn't be trying.
01-24-2014 03:10 AM
OldBlackWater It's nice to see some folks on this board still have a sense of humor.

Hell we are all going to die, might as well get some laughs in before we go!

.
01-23-2014 09:26 PM
Ricekila A little methane humor --
01-23-2014 09:03 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
It that a Jew joke
It sounded like a fart joke to me. But then again, everything sounds like a fart joke to me.
01-23-2014 08:56 PM
Ricekila It that a Jew joke
01-23-2014 08:56 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
Again from what I remember ---

Halon is heavier than air, and can stay in your lungs - plus its made from or has CFC's ( freon ) in it ----

We need a little experiment - someone with a Halon extinguisher - go in a closet -- if we don't hear from you --- we'll know ?
CO2 is heavier than air also. That's used in fire extinguishers.
01-23-2014 08:42 PM
OldBlackWater
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
Again from what I remember ---

Halon is heavier than air, and can stay in your lungs plus it made from or has CFC's ( freon ) in it ----

We need a little experiment - someone with a Halon extinguisher - go in a closet -- if we don't hear from you --- we'll know ?
And if you come out of the closet then....well we will know......

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
What we really need --- is a gas expert !
I thought that was YOU!

.
01-23-2014 08:17 PM
Ricekila What we really need --- is a gas expert !
01-23-2014 08:15 PM
Ricekila Again from what I remember ---

Halon is heavier than air, and can stay in your lungs - plus its made from or has CFC's ( freon ) in it ----

We need a little experiment - someone with a Halon extinguisher - go in a closet -- if we don't hear from you --- we'll know ?
01-23-2014 07:55 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
As I was taught -- stop a fire - remove the oxygen water drowns it -- CO-2 displaces the oxygen -- Haylon does not cool or remove the oxygen --

It chemically disrupts the combustion prosses --- not something you wanna be breathing ?

Unless they changed the formula ?
Probably not, but then again, neither is the smoke from the fire. Halon solves the problem quick without contaminating everything. It has it's uses.
01-23-2014 07:50 PM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
As I was taught -- stop a fire - remove the oxygen water drowns it -- CO-2 displaces the oxygen -- Haylon does not cool or remove the oxygen --

It chemically disrupts the combustion prosses --- not something you wanna be breathing ?

Unless they changed the formula ?
Halon is no longer legal to produce. Halotron I think is the replacement for that class of extinguisher. I have no idea if it is good.
Here is some data.
http://www.nfpa.it/halotron_referen1.htm
01-23-2014 07:41 PM
Ricekila As I was taught -- stop a fire - remove the oxygen water drowns it -- CO-2 displaces the oxygen -- Haylon does not cool or remove the oxygen --

It chemically disrupts the combustion prosses --- not something you wanna be breathing ?

Unless they changed the formula ?
01-23-2014 07:14 PM
MikeK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
Is that safe to use indoors ?
It can smother you like CO2 can, but the gas itself isn't toxic that I'm aware of. I still have a bunch of them from my racing days. I used one to put out a fire underneath my mom's clothes dryer once. It literally took just a tiny spray inside and around it.

I think they still use halon in the engine compartments of boats.
01-23-2014 06:26 PM
Justme11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricekila View Post
Is that safe to use indoors ?
Probably not safe. But if it takes 10 seconds to empty it and run, I can hold my breath. Halon is almost like magic. I saw a demonstration about 20 years ago. They lit a trash can on fire and 40 feet away they burped the extinguisher toward the fire and waited. 10 seconds later the fire simply went out. Magic. Good thing they outlawed it. It is much more environmentally friendly to have an entire house burn to the ground and then get rebuilt, than put a couple lbs of Halon into the air. We are living in stupid times.
01-23-2014 05:00 PM
destrux I keep a ten pounder in the kitchen by the back door, in the basement at the entrance to my workshop, in the living room at the bottom of the first floor staircase, in the rear upstairs bedroom next to the bathroom, and in the master bedroom. I keep a fire ladder in each second floor room that has a window except the bathroom. In the garage I have a 25 pounder by the door and a ten pounder by the workbench.

Also, a ten pounder is the minimum size if you actually want to stop a fire. The little 5 pounders they sell at most stores are a joke. My cousin's fiance emptied three of them on a (brand new) defective space heater that caught fire and it did nothing to stop it. Their house still burned down (this was three weeks ago actually). By time the smoke detector above the space heater went off the wall and floor were well engulfed.

The BEST fire prevention you can do is upgrade to the new style photoelectric smoke detectors, link them, and put one on each floor. They have less false alarms but will detect a slow starting fire up to a half hour sooner than the usual cheapo ionization style detector.

Oh and I got all my extinguishers from a care home that was throwing them out because they couldn't be recertified because of federal regs. All except the huge one, that one was a gift from a local firefighter.
01-23-2014 03:57 PM
TommyT Grevlin nailed it first, more than one extinguisher. And on each floor. Here's a real story of a fire in my house. Wife and I are at the movies. Cell phone vibrates, my oldest son says "Dad the house is on fire!" I told him to get out fast and take his brother with him, which he did. We had an extinguisher between the kitchen and the exit, so he was able to grab it without trapping himself in the kitchen. He fights the fire with his brother watching his back and also for the fire department. Son put the fire out, although the FD did scold him for fighting the fire. He told me later he thought he could fight the fire safely. Cause of fire? Roofers repairing our roof dropped shingles down the microwave exhaust ventilation pipe, which then got caught in the microwave exhaust fan, which then jammed up and caught fire, igniting the cabinets around it, then all the built up oils in the entire area. Insurance company investigators solved that one. We learned several lessons, like multiple extinguishers, not trapping yourself, checking extinguishers for serviceability, and having the proper sizes of extinguisher. (my son was only 14)
01-23-2014 10:07 AM
Capt Turk I want to add something about fire extinguisher placement. NEVER put the FE right next to an ignition source. Always mount it some feet away. For instance, don't mount the fire extinguisher right next to the cook stove. If the stove catches fire, the flames could keep you from being able to grab the extinguisher.

I've seen far too many people mount the FE on the inside of the cabinet door right next to the cook stove, where they would have to put their head almost over the stove to get to the FE.

Think about where the flames in a fire would most probably go, and give yourself room to get to the extinguisher, even with large amount of flame.
01-23-2014 09:24 AM
kfilly [QUOTE=ambos lados;6256815]As usual, whenever I have asked a question on this site, you guys come forward with a wealth of information, experience, and further references.

In some cases I don't even understand what a poster is saying until I have finished reading 10 or 15 others; then, lo and behold, the meaning of an earlier post comes into focus. I always learn more than I thought possible.

So, I've concluded, first, the ABC extinguisher I have isn't the right kind for a kitchen fire (so will go in search of the latest 711A type unit--looks like WalMart has it), and second, that the big 10 pounder ABC unit should go near the front door, the likeliest evacuation route.


Just a correction on where you wanted to put your extinguisher. You said you wanted to put it near your rear door. Ideally, the places you should put extinguishers are close to high hazard areas (like a kitchen, in a garage, etc.) and located so that they could be used to aid with egress (put out a small fire that might be blocking an exit). If you mount it by the door, you probably already have a way out there or can easily access another door.
01-22-2014 11:24 PM
Ricekila
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
I have an old 8# Halon 1211
Is that safe to use indoors ?
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