Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Disaster Preparedness General Discussion
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-13-2009, 09:18 AM
josh1815 josh1815 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Storing food underground



Advertise Here

I have a question about storing canned food underground. I live in central Florida and had the idea to bury a deep freezer and seal the lid to keep some of my canned food. What are your thoughts on this. What about the winter is it cold enough to bust the cans? What about condensation? What about the Florida heat? This is my first time posting any ideas will be helpfull.
Old 11-13-2009, 09:43 AM
capelthwait capelthwait is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Age: 44
Posts: 210
Thanks: 115
Thanked 232 Times in 106 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by josh1815 View Post
I have a question about storing canned food underground. I live in central Florida and had the idea to bury a deep freezer and seal the lid to keep some of my canned food. What are your thoughts on this. What about the winter is it cold enough to bust the cans? What about condensation? What about the Florida heat? This is my first time posting any ideas will be helpfull.

How cold do your winter's get? A freezer has insulation in it and so does the ground. If you put a layer of 1 or 2 inch ridged insulation on top of that with something to weight it down I would think it would survive a mild winter. If you get a deep freeze where it gets down to below zero F for several nights in a row then you might have problems, but the ground can keep an area insulated from 20 to 50 degrees warmer (or cooler) than it is up top. So do you have a whole lot of below 10 degree F winter nights? If you do you might have to put more insulation around it plus bury it a bit deeper. Ten feet down with something to block the outside air from coming down keeps my unheated roots cellars between 45 and 55 degrees all year long no matter how cold or hot it gets.
Old 11-13-2009, 09:56 AM
superdeluxe's Avatar
superdeluxe superdeluxe is offline
Tales of a Scorched Earth
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 561
Thanks: 158
Thanked 325 Times in 161 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by josh1815 View Post
I have a question about storing canned food underground. I live in central Florida and had the idea to bury a deep freezer and seal the lid to keep some of my canned food. What are your thoughts on this. What about the winter is it cold enough to bust the cans? What about condensation? What about the Florida heat? This is my first time posting any ideas will be helpfull.
If you have your items underground, It is usually a nice 60-65 degrees year round. I used to actually live in a underground basement, and while everyone was upstairs cooking in the hot sun, I was nice and happy in my 65-68 degree temps.
Old 11-13-2009, 11:18 AM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 51
Posts: 50,668
Thanks: 92,179
Thanked 104,895 Times in 33,600 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Underground temps are just about perfect for food storage. In fact, even in the old days that's how they stored food. They made root cellars to keep their harvest in. Even in cold climates you can keep food from freezing as long as it's below the frost line. In Florida, you won't have that problem.
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 11-13-2009, 01:26 PM
arisinwind's Avatar
arisinwind arisinwind is offline
Just A Shadow
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Central Florida
Posts: 680
Thanks: 335
Thanked 1,299 Times in 317 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by josh1815 View Post
I have a question about storing canned food underground. I live in central Florida and had the idea to bury a deep freezer and seal the lid to keep some of my canned food. What are your thoughts on this. What about the winter is it cold enough to bust the cans? What about condensation? What about the Florida heat? This is my first time posting any ideas will be helpfull.
You shouldn't have any problems. To bust the cans the temperature has to be below freezing for quit awhile - and that won't happen in Florida. The ground temperature won't be below 72 degrees. It may be even higher depending where in Florida you are.
Old 11-13-2009, 01:38 PM
oif1man's Avatar
oif1man oif1man is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,423
Thanks: 301
Thanked 1,384 Times in 679 Posts
Default

Being from Florida (and familiar with the central florida topography) I would also say that freezing below the surface won't be a problem at all, even in most of northern Florida. The biggest problem you will have is moisture and water. Many wells in this area are only dug to about 40 feet-like mine. Thus, if you dig too deep water will be a huge problem. Also, a freezer, being mostly metal, may rust in a little over a year due to the sandy soil and the rainy season.

I personally wouldn't use a freezer but would try some other plastic container that is well sealed--to block out moisture, and oxygen absorbers. I must admit I am new to using oxygen absorbers so I can only assume they will work. Well now you got me thinking, now I am thinking about burying something in the yard just to test it out. The only way to know for sure is to try it.
Old 11-13-2009, 05:44 PM
doughboy1661's Avatar
doughboy1661 doughboy1661 is offline
Impimus Maximus
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: middle of VA
Posts: 174
Thanks: 69
Thanked 100 Times in 55 Posts
Default

As Oif just said, you would need to worry about rust, and the buoyancy of the freezer, too. Your canned goods would help weigh it down, but if it's only half full and you get a good rain, it'll pop up to the surface.
Old 11-13-2009, 09:40 PM
Arkman's Avatar
Arkman Arkman is offline
BTDT and it still hurts..
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 65
Thanks: 23
Thanked 40 Times in 19 Posts
Default

I bury mine in a sealed 55 gallon plastic drum. About 58 degrees year round. S.Carolina Hot summers. Your water table might pose a bigger problem. 10 inches of dirt over mine. zero problems have had several for years. Freezing is not an issue underground.
Old 11-13-2009, 11:26 PM
Mtnman Mike's Avatar
Mtnman Mike Mtnman Mike is offline
Tested in the Wilderness
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado and Wyoming in the warm months on my BOL
Age: 56
Posts: 4,850
Thanks: 9,358
Thanked 17,303 Times in 3,561 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 2
Default

Here in the Rocky Mountains and on my mtn retreat I have had many cans of food become froze solid when I have left them up there for a year or two. And the metal cans never break. Glass jars and most glass containers will break as I have sadly found out. Plastic jars will not break when frozen either.

One has to have a well sealed and deep underground shelter for the temperature to remain fifty degrees or so year round. I have experience with that also....
Old 11-14-2009, 07:32 AM
josh1815 josh1815 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

You all have been very helpfull. Thank you for taking the time to answer my question
Old 11-14-2009, 09:04 AM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 16,449
Thanks: 18,750
Thanked 22,883 Times in 9,296 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

We use 55-gallon steel drums. They are food-grade and withstand most anything. I get them from a local twinky factory for free.
Old 11-14-2009, 09:50 AM
TANSTAF1's Avatar
TANSTAF1 TANSTAF1 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Born in ME,in exile in MA
Posts: 2,743
Thanks: 922
Thanked 1,862 Times in 1,008 Posts
Default

Wow! They make Twinkies in Maine? And up in the boonies to boot. I didn't know that.
Old 11-14-2009, 10:41 AM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 16,449
Thanks: 18,750
Thanked 22,883 Times in 9,296 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Sorry, I should clarify, the factory makes an assortment of sponge-cake pastries, some with pineapple or banana fillings.

The drums are food-grade but smell of vanilla, or pineapple, or banana. And some were full of lard.
Old 03-14-2011, 08:36 PM
Parkstranger Parkstranger is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default Drum storage for foos etc

I have a question about using metal drums for storage. Are there any issues with them rusting through?? Also with the large open topped plastic drums can you seal them so that they are water proof??

Any help would be great...
Old 03-14-2011, 08:50 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 16,449
Thanks: 18,750
Thanked 22,883 Times in 9,296 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

They can rust through, given 40 years.
Old 03-14-2011, 09:39 PM
Parkstranger Parkstranger is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
They can rust through, given 40 years.
Lets see I will be about almost 100 yrs old then, so I guess that's long enough.
The Following User Says Thank You to Parkstranger For This Useful Post:
Old 03-14-2011, 10:08 PM
oldcamper's Avatar
oldcamper oldcamper is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,040
Thanks: 886
Thanked 675 Times in 403 Posts
Default

yes some times you just have to take a chance and use something that will rot in 40 years. LOL
Old 03-14-2011, 10:12 PM
eatrbbq's Avatar
eatrbbq eatrbbq is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 277
Thanks: 276
Thanked 304 Times in 131 Posts
Default

Might want to think about Sink Holes in Central and Southern FL. If I still lived in Central FL I certainly wouldn't consider burying food.
Old 03-14-2011, 10:40 PM
fwilliam1 fwilliam1 is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 293
Thanks: 1
Thanked 302 Times in 140 Posts
Default

I live in a cold climate and I can tell you that once you get below the frost line, even frigid cold temperatures don't matter. The water and sewage lines here are buried at least 4 to 5 feet underground and are unaffected by the cold or heat. Temperatures in the winter can get down to -40 F.
Old 03-15-2011, 07:33 AM
Parkstranger Parkstranger is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Just looked it up for here in Mo. 2 feet is good, Still thats a bunch of digging for a big drum.
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
shtf food storage, stockpiling food, storing food, storing food for shtf, storing food underground, survival food preps, underground storage



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net