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Old 10-17-2009, 09:03 AM
mattieboy131 mattieboy131 is offline
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Default Small apartment - Sources of heat with no power?



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I currently live in a apartment with 3 other friends. We live along coastal New England and the winters can be very cold around these parts. Last winter we had a HUGE snow/ice storm rip through here that caused us to loose power for 2 days (some places that were hit harder didn't have it back for 1+ weeks). The first night my girlfriend and I decided to "tough it out" and stayed here without heat. Sleeping was fine since we had plenty of blankets and each other's body warmth, but in the morning the house was FREEZING! We then decided it best to go to somewhere with heat the next night since it was just too cold.

My question is, what are some good sources of non-electrically powered heat? I also cannot start a fire (for obvious reasons). And cannot think of anything else. Anyone got any suggestions? I would like to have a back-up just in case this happens again this winter.
Old 10-17-2009, 09:19 AM
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Not sure if you ban on fire includes candles but they provide a surprising amount of heat. For a little more money an investment in a propane space heater would be sufficient to heat a bedroom to a comfortable level.

My dad has this one and it works quite well.
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...ndingMethod=rr
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Old 10-17-2009, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urban View Post
Not sure if you ban on fire includes candles but they provide a surprising amount of heat. For a little more money an investment in a propane space heater would be sufficient to heat a bedroom to a comfortable level.

My dad has this one and it works quite well.
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...ndingMethod=rr
Our apartment is heated with propane but I think it needs electricity to start it. I worry about this too, as winters in Maine are brutal. And we don't know anyone here with a wood stove. We do but they have no room for more people. Plus the stove is electric. Pretty scarey thought.
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Old 10-17-2009, 12:12 PM
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Is your stove propane? If it is, you can get some bottled gas and hook them up to it, but this is no long-term solution, as you probably will not be able to refill them when needed.
Old 10-17-2009, 12:12 PM
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Kerosene heaters. If you handle them with respect and don't dump kerosene all over the place they don't smell and the off give great heat. You can get them off craigslist for 20 bucks. I've got 2 20000btu units that I switch out. When one empties I start the other and take the empty one out for refil. Costs 3 bucks a day to heat the first floor of my house.
Old 10-17-2009, 12:17 PM
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oh yeah here's a linky

http://www.endtimesreport.com/kerosene.html

I've also gotten out of coleman stoves and lanterns and into butterfly kerosene stuff.
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Old 10-17-2009, 12:25 PM
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A problem I see with living in any home were the climate gets cold without heat is water pipes bursting you have to maintain a temperature of no lower than 55F if the water is still running during SHTF
Old 10-17-2009, 12:27 PM
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Kerosene is good but be sure you have a safe place to store the kerosene.
Heater Buddy is what I have. It takes the small propane tanks and I keep about 40 of them stored up. It is safe for indoor use and has a low oxygen cut off but you still want to leave a window cracked.
It works well as a supplement to my woodburning stove.
I'm also keeping an eye out for a good used kerosene heater
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Old 10-17-2009, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
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Kerosene is good but be sure you have a safe place to store the kerosene.
Heater Buddy is what I have. It takes the small propane tanks and I keep about 40 of them stored up. It is safe for indoor use and has a low oxygen cut off but you still want to leave a window cracked.
It works well as a supplement to my woodburning stove.
I'm also keeping an eye out for a good used kerosene heater
When I was a you'un most folks who lived in tenements had a stall in the basement where they kept their 55gal drum of kerosene/stove oil.
Old 10-17-2009, 01:31 PM
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Quote:
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A problem I see with living in any home were the climate gets cold without heat is water pipes bursting you have to maintain a temperature of no lower than 55F if the water is still running during SHTF
Damn global warming. Water used to have to be 32 degrees before it would freeze.
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Old 10-17-2009, 01:57 PM
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Body heat, all get in a sleeping bag and spoon.
Old 10-17-2009, 02:20 PM
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Do you have a balcony or other storage space? 20,000 btus kerosene heater will use about 1/2 gallon per 8 hours. You can buy kerosene for less than $4.00 a gallon.

One of the BigBuddy heaters will give you 18,000 btus of but will use about five one pound cylinders in 8 hours. You can hook one of these heaters up to a 20# or larger tank that are used in propane grill or RVs. You need a hose and adapter that you can get a Wal-Mart in the camping section for about $25.00. If you are going this way, I would suggest that you buy one of the propane "trees" that allow you to have a lantern on top and attach two hoses. One you can use for the heater and one for a propane cook stove. One 20# tank would last you about two days especially if you turn the heater down on low at night.

The propane setup will cost you more initially as well as whenever you use it, but gives you greater flexibility and the 20# tanks are easier to store. I have both propane and kerosene heaters. I've used them both inside at different times. I only use the kerosene heater in the shop now because I've installed a wood stove in the house.
Old 10-17-2009, 02:45 PM
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to keep the pipes from freezing let them trickle or run at a steady flow... running water takes longer to freeze!
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Old 10-18-2009, 02:06 PM
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You've got several options, actually. Kerosene heaters are my favorite. They put out a LOT of heat, and kerosene is safe to store. Propane heaters are another option, but propane is bulkier than kerosene. A more radical option is a wood stove. There are small, folding wood stoves that can be kept in the top of a closet until needed. The chimney pipe nestles together to pack down small too. You can cut a piece of plywood the same size as a window pane and install the chimney pipe through it. In a crisis, you can remove the window pane and install the plywood. Afterwards, reinstall the window. Nothing permanent. Wood heat is a better long term option, whereas propane or kerosene are good short term (a week or two) options. Just something to think about.
Old 10-18-2009, 05:04 PM
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MikeK,

Do you know of any specific wood stoves like the one you described? that sounds like a GREAT SHTF piece of equipment.
Old 10-18-2009, 07:03 PM
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I have a similar situation. This has been my toughest challenge in prepping for my own personal "threat assesment". My biggest concern is the Carbon Monoxide. I know that Mr. Buddy makes a heater that is "safe" for inside, but I'm not sure if I trust that. I don't think this is something one should penny pinch on. Maybe a Mr. Buddy and a battery powered carbon monixide detector? I think Candles might be my best option. I'm just not sold on the safety of these alleged indoor Mr. Buddy heaters... any reviews anyone?
Old 10-18-2009, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crownvic View Post
I have a similar situation. This has been my toughest challenge in prepping for my own personal "threat assesment". My biggest concern is the Carbon Monoxide. I know that Mr. Buddy makes a heater that is "safe" for inside, but I'm not sure if I trust that. I don't think this is something one should penny pinch on. Maybe a Mr. Buddy and a battery powered carbon monixide detector? I think Candles might be my best option. I'm just not sold on the safety of these alleged indoor Mr. Buddy heaters... any reviews anyone?
Crack a window about an inch and that solves the problem. If you don't you more run the risk of the heater consuming the O2 in the room more than carbon monoxide. That is the same problem with any flame heat source.
Old 10-18-2009, 07:47 PM
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Get a 4 sesons tent and get some wood planks so that u can make a simplewoodframe on the floor for the tent and sleepingbags that are for cold... and use small candles u will survive any thing whit that kit.....
Old 10-18-2009, 09:41 PM
mattieboy131 mattieboy131 is offline
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Just remembered this link I found on how to build a "solar-powered heater" with pretty common, every-day items. Obviously not necessarily something you would have around all the time (unless you want to design one for a similar purpose as this poster did - a garage heater), but a great thing to keep in mind if a semi-permanent/permanent SHTF scenario really played out.

http://www.thegoodhuman.com/2009/06/...an-old-window/
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Old 10-18-2009, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
You've got several options, actually. Kerosene heaters are my favorite. They put out a LOT of heat, and kerosene is safe to store. Propane heaters are another option, but propane is bulkier than kerosene. A more radical option is a wood stove. There are small, folding wood stoves that can be kept in the top of a closet until needed. The chimney pipe nestles together to pack down small too. You can cut a piece of plywood the same size as a window pane and install the chimney pipe through it. In a crisis, you can remove the window pane and install the plywood. Afterwards, reinstall the window. Nothing permanent. Wood heat is a better long term option, whereas propane or kerosene are good short term (a week or two) options. Just something to think about.
Ive done this before but instead of a window pain, I made the plywood to fit the whole window. Id store it behind the fridge, and when i needed the heater just open the window, pop it in, and go.
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