Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Food and water
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Food and water Discussion on food and water storage, water purification and related topics.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-10-2009, 03:34 PM
Nightside_Eclipse's Avatar
Nightside_Eclipse Nightside_Eclipse is offline
Take me out to the black
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 3,030
Thanks: 1,542
Thanked 2,794 Times in 1,286 Posts
Default ? about canning on a glass top stove.



Advertise Here

My girlfriend is wanting to get into canning and I was looking at buying her one of those Ball water bath canning kits.

Problem is, we have a glass top stove and I've been reading very mixed reviews about using WB canners on glass top stoves, some people say the weight is too heavy and others say it can't get hot enough to boil the water and others say that it builds up too much heat for the top to handle (not sure how the top could possibly get hotter than the element could make it though...)

Does anyone have any advice or experiences with our dilemma?

Thanks in advance.
Old 08-10-2009, 03:49 PM
letsgetreal letsgetreal is offline
Really?
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 16,130
Thanks: 6,475
Thanked 10,171 Times in 4,915 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster Top Poster 
Total Awards: 2
Default

Not about the stove...it's about the heat( thermometer).
Old 08-10-2009, 03:52 PM
Ramona M. Faunce Ramona M. Faunce is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Cave Junction Oregon
Posts: 6,538
Thanks: 8,848
Thanked 7,716 Times in 2,951 Posts
Default

I have been using my pressure canner for the past 2 weeks on my glass top stove. I don't tighten the lid down for the water bath treatment. My jars are sealing really nice.

One tip: Put a thick bath towel on your counter top. When you bring your jars out of the hot water bath, tighten the lids and turn them over. Place your jars upside down on the bath towel. Let cool down over night.

This brings the heat to the lid and seals better.
The Following User Says Thank You to Ramona M. Faunce For This Useful Post:
Old 08-10-2009, 03:52 PM
bridgierapa's Avatar
bridgierapa bridgierapa is offline
This is a great survival forum
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wairarapa, New Zealand. Hot, dry in summer (clay), floody & wet in winter.
Posts: 3,509
Thanks: 5,726
Thanked 3,586 Times in 1,796 Posts
Default

If you're talking ceramic cooktop - it's just slower. I believe the glass is reinforced. you could call the manufacturer of the cooker & ask what the loading is as a first move.

Definitely a slow stove, and what used to really get up my nose was the inability to cook with a wok because the stove 'didn't think you had anything on it' and would turn itself off. To be second-guessed by an inanimate object - roll on "1984."
Old 08-10-2009, 06:31 PM
XS29L's Avatar
XS29L XS29L is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,046
Thanks: 1,330
Thanked 2,183 Times in 549 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Myself, I wouldn't make it a habit of canning on a glass top stove. BUT... my brother and sister in law have pressure canned on their glass top stove for 8 years or better. They do around 300 quarts of meat and green beans on it per year and almost always use two canners at one time. They use 30 quart and 21 quart All-American canners (models 930 and 921) and they use them both at the same time. I'd say that is at least 80 pounds of weight all together. Their stove is a Whirlpool flat glass top and I think they paid a good bit for it, so it might be a heavier model. They always complain about the time it takes to heat up.

I totally agree with dilligaf, get an outdoor propane burner like the ones used to fry turkeys. There is so much more heat and control with that type of burner, it will make your canning ventures so much easier. You will also save gas (or electricity) by not having it on for so long, and your house will be much cooler.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to XS29L For This Useful Post:
Old 08-10-2009, 07:20 PM
tkd tkd is offline
Watching and Learning
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: North Mississippi
Posts: 179
Thanks: 125
Thanked 164 Times in 81 Posts
Default

I have been canning on my glass top... no problems re: breaking glass, etc. It takes FOREVER to get it boiling with that much water though. I am looking into changing the glass out for the old style elements... mine are interchangable.
Old 08-10-2009, 07:23 PM
letsgetreal letsgetreal is offline
Really?
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 16,130
Thanks: 6,475
Thanked 10,171 Times in 4,915 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster Top Poster 
Total Awards: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by XS29L View Post
Myself, I wouldn't make it a habit of canning on a glass top stove. BUT... my brother and sister in law have pressure canned on their glass top stove for 8 years or better. They do around 300 quarts of meat and green beans on it per year and almost always use two canners at one time. They use 30 quart and 21 quart All-American canners (models 930 and 921) and they use them both at the same time. I'd say that is at least 80 pounds of weight all together. Their stove is a Whirlpool flat glass top and I think they paid a good bit for it, so it might be a heavier model. They always complain about the time it takes to heat up.

I totally agree with dilligaf, get an outdoor propane burner like the ones used to fry turkeys. There is so much more heat and control with that type of burner, it will make your canning ventures so much easier. You will also save gas (or electricity) by not having it on for so long, and your house will be much cooler.
We always canned outside......I cant imagine canning inside.
The Following User Says Thank You to letsgetreal For This Useful Post:
Old 08-10-2009, 10:22 PM
Ruhamey's Avatar
Ruhamey Ruhamey is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 215
Thanks: 68
Thanked 147 Times in 83 Posts
Default

At church we bought two stoves for that purpose. Both are glass top, commercial, GE profile. These are only available thru restaurant supply houses. That is the ONLY one with burners big enough to handle canners. The standard stoves have a problem with cycling on and off to prevent and overheating problem. It can be done, but all of the manufacturers recommend against it. Having been the designer of many of the thermostats on the market in US made stoves (previous life) in the early '90's, I can tell you that thermal protection of the unit is a priority, and they should not allow you to do this.
Old 08-10-2009, 10:23 PM
oktx's Avatar
oktx oktx is offline
Tough Chick
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: OKC, OK
Posts: 2,981
Thanks: 2,417
Thanked 3,326 Times in 1,369 Posts
Default

I can on my ceramic cooktop with a pressure canner with no issues ... but... do not slide the canner around on your stovetop or you will scratch it. (Don't know about water bath canning. Haven't tried that.)
Old 08-11-2009, 01:47 AM
DaggerD DaggerD is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 315
Thanks: 82
Thanked 322 Times in 117 Posts
Default

I WB can on our glass top with no problems.
Old 08-11-2009, 01:47 AM
barrettdp barrettdp is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 266
Thanks: 471
Thanked 227 Times in 117 Posts
Default

I too use a pressure canner on my glasstop stove with no problems. Come to think of it, I also use a much heavier cast iron dutch oven on it with no problems
Old 08-11-2009, 02:56 AM
sailinghudson25's Avatar
sailinghudson25 sailinghudson25 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 4,885
Thanks: 645
Thanked 2,808 Times in 1,753 Posts
Default

I can with a Presto 18 quart model on a glasstop, it's slow. I recently made a custom cover for it with a wool fire blanket. Now it heats up about 20% faster. A 1.5hr boil takes me about 2.5 hours. I even cheat a bit. I cold pack and put the cans in 180 deg+ water to speed up the process. Haven't had a can crack yet......
Old 08-11-2009, 08:28 AM
Nightside_Eclipse's Avatar
Nightside_Eclipse Nightside_Eclipse is offline
Take me out to the black
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albany, GA
Posts: 3,030
Thanks: 1,542
Thanked 2,794 Times in 1,286 Posts
Default

Thanks a lot for the input!

I'm thinking I'll play it safe and just get a propane fish cooker and use that.

Would also come in handy for cooking when the power goes out too.
Old 08-11-2009, 08:38 AM
TNPetite.45's Avatar
TNPetite.45 TNPetite.45 is offline
The Power of III
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: West TN
Posts: 1,365
Thanks: 1,906
Thanked 1,501 Times in 653 Posts
Default

I can on my ceramic top stove - I use a steam canner for most of my high-acid things and a pressure canner for the rest - It does take forever to get that much water boiling like the other posts mentioned
Old 08-11-2009, 01:45 PM
SgtBooker44's Avatar
SgtBooker44 SgtBooker44 is offline
Ron Swanson 2016
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Posts: 32,199
Thanks: 4,391
Thanked 27,187 Times in 14,238 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster 
Total Awards: 1
Default

I use an All American 921 on a propane turkey deep fryer base. It fit right in. I nevr tried a glass top, but wold be afraid if I slipped and dropped the heavy canner, it might break the glass top.
Old 08-12-2009, 09:49 AM
Ivanhoe72 Ivanhoe72 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default funny shirt

We just use our glass top stove as well. We have a family of 10 and we loves to can together – great bonding time!

Have you seen this t-shirt? It says “Yes, we canned!” Check it out at:
http://www.cafepress.com/pooplespile
Old 08-12-2009, 06:54 PM
IceFire's Avatar
IceFire IceFire is offline
I have control issues
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southeast AZ
Posts: 3,206
Thanks: 1,910
Thanked 2,814 Times in 1,413 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Gardening Post or Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

It all depends on the make/model and age of the stove...some older models of ceramic-top stoves can not handle the weight. I just bought a ceramic-top stove this year, and have had no problem with cooking with cast-iron pans (about all I use) or with pressure canning. I made sure that I bought one with the dual elements of the right size for my pressure canner, so haven't noticed any problems/difference whatsoever.
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net