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Old 12-18-2007, 11:28 PM
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i can google how to cure meat no problem. but my question is if the SHTF and you cant get the right kind of salt at the store inorder to cure meat. How do you make meat cureing salt? i cant find that,there has to be a way .how did the pioneers do it?
Old 12-18-2007, 11:43 PM
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Here, we use rock/common salt for meat. Actually, we use rock/common salt for any type of canning
I know sea salt is good also, but here sea salt is not easy available.
If rock salt have a large quatity of dirt, you can dissolve it in water, remove the dirt (it will be down on the pot) and evaporate the water. The remaining salt will be almost 100% pure

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Old 12-19-2007, 12:08 AM
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so just regular salt i though you had to have certain kind of salt ok thats good to know
Old 12-19-2007, 01:11 AM
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:D regular salt, but take care, salt with iodine is not recommended to preserve any type of food.

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Old 12-19-2007, 01:56 AM
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so scouting a salt mine in walking distance would be a great find. if you cant find a mine there is no other way of getting salt from nature is there.
Old 12-19-2007, 01:58 AM
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same concept if you live near the ocean. make a 6'x6' solar still and place a sheet across the bottom. fill with ocean water, allow to evaporate and repeat. eventually you will get large amounts of salt.
Old 12-19-2007, 02:09 AM
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I read somewhere you can replace salt in diet with chicory ash or with animal blood, but for preserving food, i doubt will work.
Scout a salt source near you (mine, sea water) or stockpile. And stockpile double than you will imagine The salt price will allow you that
Also, take a look here http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=3663

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Old 12-19-2007, 02:17 AM
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no, those wont work for preserving but they do well for supplements in your diet in a survival situation. good info.
Old 12-19-2007, 04:12 AM
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I think when the shtf the most simple way to preserve meat will be to wind dry it if you have the right climate.
Old 12-19-2007, 07:07 AM
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dry or smoke, i agree.
Old 12-19-2007, 11:39 AM
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brine that is what i need to look for http://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/en...px?entryID=567 http://www.crt.state.la.us/archaeology/SALT/product.htm what does it look like? water? salty water?
Old 12-19-2007, 12:30 PM
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:D I believe, in our times, all the brine springs are exploated in a way or other. Look for clorine/detergent plants (80% of them need salt), holiday centre (some of them are based on brides springs) or mines. Also, try to have a geological map of your area, be cause on them appear almost all sources of salt.
Brine is water with different concentration of salt. Sometimes only a small bitterish taste, sometimes a hard salt taste If you have brine, in any concentration, you can evaporate water easy (sun heat is more than enought, even at north pole) and have any salt you need. If you have some tools (densimeters) you can use brine directly to preserve food, or adjust salt concentration in brine (add water/evaporate some water) to be proper for your needs.

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Old 12-19-2007, 02:54 PM
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You are right, Bogdan. Some of the salt springs in Europe are very high in potassium which tastes bitter but can be separated out be crystallizing it out as you boil out the water. The central US has huge amounts underground salt. Based on the salt springs around the Great Lakes, bitterness is not a problem. The county highway departments usually have large stores of sand and salt. Even if it is mixed with sand, the salt can be extracted with hot water. Should the salt be mixed with magnesium or calcium salts, you can purify it by recrystallizing also. Remember too, salt can be purified and reused. The earth floors in smoke houses where dug up and the salt that dripped from the curing meat extracted for reuse. Ultimately, if you have read my post on extracting potassium nitrate (salt peter) from enriched compost, regular salt was a major waste product separated by recrystallization. Before you say “yuck poo” remember how many time it is purified by boiling and reboiling.
Old 12-20-2007, 04:43 PM
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The highway department near my community has a small pond beside it that has become contaminated with salt, caused by runoff from their rocksalt stores. The salt concentration in this pond is many times higher than the nearby sea water. I think this is a source that most people may overlook.
I should add that at least around here I think that they sometimes mix other chemicals to the salt-sand mix, depending on the temperature at the time it is expected to be spread. As far as I know this is only mixed in just before the mix is loaded onto the trucks.
Old 12-21-2007, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryptkeeper View Post
i can google how to cure meat no problem. but my question is if the SHTF and you cant get the right kind of salt at the store inorder to cure meat. How do you make meat cureing salt? i cant find that,there has to be a way .how did the pioneers do it?
The pioneers bought it.:D

It would be best for us to do that to. It's cheap, and stores indefinitely.
I bought bags of Mortons TenderQuick cure and put it in qt canning jars with plastic lids instead of the metal ones.
Old 12-21-2007, 10:28 PM
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most in my state are taken over but interesting i found that there is a river . the, saline river, named because of all the salt that is in the river ( i didnt know that) that why they named it that. amasing the thing you can find out about your state. google is great!!
Old 12-21-2007, 11:48 PM
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Kosher or other flaked salt is the very best salt type for meat preservation but crystal salt will certanly work.

KOSHER SALT: evaporated from a brine, usually under specific conditions approved by the Orthodox Jewish faith. It contains no additives or added iodine This salt is used in "kashering" meat to make the flesh kosher for eating. This involves first soaking the meat then rubbing it with the salt to draw out the blood which is not-kosher and is subsequently washed off along with the salt. The cleansed meat is then kosher. What makes it of interest for food storage and preservation is that it is generally pure salt suitable for canning, pickling and meat curing. It is of a larger grain size than table or canning salt, and usually rolled to make the grains flaked for easier dissolving. Frequently it is slightly cheaper than canning salt and usually easier to find in urban/suburban
Old 12-22-2007, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality Czech View Post
I bought bags of Mortons TenderQuick cure and put it in qt canning jars with plastic lids instead of the metal ones.
Definitely use non-metal items to store salt. It is very, very corrosive.
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Old 12-22-2007, 11:46 AM
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couldnt you just put it in zip lock freezer bags?then put the bags in a plastic bucket/barrel with a lid.
Old 12-22-2007, 02:37 PM
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Among Morton Tender Quick Meat Cure Ingredients are Salt, Sugar, Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Nitrite, Propylene Glycol. Many people object to using the Nitrites as they can cause cancer parroting chemicals when the meats are cooked. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Propylene Glycol are not necessary and we never used them in generations.
I store the sugar and salt separately for greater flexibility and cheaper that way too. One other thing, if you hang your hams in a curing bag, they will keep for many months, even years if dry enough. The dry end of a root celler is a good place.
I don’t know if “ham beetles” are a problem every where but we always put a couple of table spoons of ground Cayenne pepper on out (bag) side of the cure mix to keep them out of the hanging meat. It works well and slightly flavors the meat too.
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