Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) Survival
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-13-2009, 12:09 PM
badmuther's Avatar
badmuther badmuther is offline
Recent Blog:
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NC
Posts: 29
Thanks: 15
Thanked 13 Times in 8 Posts
Default Railroad Tie shelters



Advertise Here

Anyone ever built one?

I'm looking to build a fairly inexpensive fallout shelter. My plan was to dig a trench and then put railroad ties parallel with the trench and then stack a single layer crossways of ties on them. WP with tarps and go from there.

It would be similiar to some of the field expedient shelters that Cresson Kearny recommends in Nuclear War Survival Skills.

Anyone actually built one of these or one like I'm describing?

Jim
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to badmuther For This Useful Post:
Old 03-13-2009, 12:23 PM
olddude olddude is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: north east
Posts: 1,145
Thanks: 9
Thanked 337 Times in 241 Posts
Default

only draw back would be the creasolte thats in them,it can cause burns and the smell would get to you pretty quick,they say creasolte can cause cancer its not used anymore.in some places you can get old ones pretty cheap.
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to olddude For This Useful Post:
Old 03-13-2009, 12:27 PM
badmuther's Avatar
badmuther badmuther is offline
Recent Blog:
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NC
Posts: 29
Thanks: 15
Thanked 13 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by olddude View Post
only draw back would be the creasolte thats in them,it can cause burns and the smell would get to you pretty quick,they say creasolte can cause cancer its not used anymore.in some places you can get old ones pretty cheap.
Yeah, I didn't think about them "off gassing" in a confined space. Might be something to think about.

With the shelter being somewhat ventilated most of the time and then with a Kearney Air Pump, I think that it would be ok.

Thanks for the input!
The Following User Says Thank You to badmuther For This Useful Post:
Old 03-13-2009, 01:02 PM
olddude olddude is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: north east
Posts: 1,145
Thanks: 9
Thanked 337 Times in 241 Posts
Default

newer pressure treated 6x6 would be better health wise but cost a lot more,you could always cover the interior with mesh and then stuckel it with cement to seal it,how about tires filled and tamped with dirt,tires are free for the takening can be used over lapping each row locking them in place,but a lot of labor filling them with dirt and tamping them,the dirt would come frm the hole you dug ,tires would last a lifetime maybe old telephone poles for a roof befor burying it cover with black poly to make it more water proof is another idea.they make houses with them in the south west covering the inside with mesh and then cement,
Old 03-13-2009, 01:07 PM
Jerry D Young's Avatar
Jerry D Young Jerry D Young is offline
www.jerrydyoung.com

 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Reno, NV
Age: 61
Posts: 7,952
Thanks: 8,651
Thanked 40,177 Times in 5,559 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Put down a layer of plastic first and then the ties to insulate the living space from the creasote.
__________________
Jerry D Young
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jerry D Young For This Useful Post:
Old 03-13-2009, 03:45 PM
badmuther's Avatar
badmuther badmuther is offline
Recent Blog:
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NC
Posts: 29
Thanks: 15
Thanked 13 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry D Young View Post
Put down a layer of plastic first and then the ties to insulate the living space from the creasote.

Sometimes the best answer is the simplest and the one you never think of.

You could do plastic before and after the ties, before dirt and another layer of plastic. Any water in between your plastic and ties down the road would be a problem.

Last edited by badmuther; 03-13-2009 at 03:48 PM.. Reason: added info.
The Following User Says Thank You to badmuther For This Useful Post:
Old 03-13-2009, 04:28 PM
joes's Avatar
joes joes is offline
Preparing since 1972
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Black Hills
Posts: 4,779
Thanks: 36,058
Thanked 4,735 Times in 2,238 Posts
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by badmuther View Post
Yeah, I didn't think about them "off gassing" in a confined space. Might be something to think about.

With the shelter being somewhat ventilated most of the time and then with a Kearney Air Pump, I think that it would be ok.

Thanks for the input!
How about using those ties like u wanted but also put on the walls corrugated tin roofing ??? U can get it at Menards ect...that way it would be more water proof too and it's easy to put up...Hang it horizontally.........
Old 03-14-2009, 12:28 AM
Mtnman Mike's Avatar
Mtnman Mike Mtnman Mike is offline
Tested in the Wilderness
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado and Wyoming in the warm months on my BOL
Age: 56
Posts: 4,757
Thanks: 8,979
Thanked 16,703 Times in 3,471 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by badmuther View Post
Anyone ever built one?

I'm looking to build a fairly inexpensive fallout shelter. My plan was to dig a trench and then put railroad ties parallel with the trench and then stack a single layer crossways of ties on them. WP with tarps and go from there.

It would be similiar to some of the field expedient shelters that Cresson Kearny recommends in Nuclear War Survival Skills.

Anyone actually built one of these or one like I'm describing?

Jim
The Most inexpensive underground shelter plans I have ever found and the ones I did use are the small pole shelter plans in the Free book > www.oism.org/nwss

To see pics and details of the underground shelter - bunker - fallout & storm shelter I have built, just go to this thread >

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=42447

I am glad many have looked at my pics but I thought a few more would make more comments and maybe even ask more questions about my bunker etc.?

I do not think people are fully prepared or are hard core survivalists either if they do not have an underground shelter of some kind. Or at Least the plan to build one such as given in the book www.oism.org/nwss
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Mtnman Mike For This Useful Post:
Old 03-14-2009, 01:23 AM
mcgyver1467's Avatar
mcgyver1467 mcgyver1467 is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 429
Thanks: 243
Thanked 311 Times in 138 Posts
Default

I think the railroad tie shelter is a good idea. With the tar in the wood it will stop a lot more than wood itself. I would cover the inside with plastic then plywood. That will help seal out the tar and not leave just exposed plastic. Just make sure you attach the ties together so they do not shift. Drilling holes and inserting rebar works well.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mcgyver1467 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-14-2009, 01:27 AM
oktx's Avatar
oktx oktx is offline
Tough Chick
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: OKC, OK
Posts: 2,981
Thanks: 2,417
Thanked 3,324 Times in 1,369 Posts
Default

We had railroad ties around the garden beds when I was a kid. I didn't even like to stand near them they smelled so bad. They were pretty old as well. I can't imagine living in a shelter built of something that smelled like that.
The Following User Says Thank You to oktx For This Useful Post:
Old 03-14-2009, 10:35 PM
FredLee FredLee is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: michigan
Posts: 4,092
Thanks: 128
Thanked 2,142 Times in 1,180 Posts
Default

If you just stack railroad ties without some way of pinning them together,they will push inward as you backfill with earth.If you look at the Russian small pole shelter,its designed so that backfilling actually locks the design together tighter.And its designed to flex from overpressure.
Railroad ties are heavy,too.Wouldn't be my first choice.Treated lumber has formeldihyde in it.
The Following User Says Thank You to FredLee For This Useful Post:
Old 03-14-2009, 10:50 PM
firehiker's Avatar
firehiker firehiker is offline
dum dum
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: N TX
Posts: 1,238
Thanks: 640
Thanked 795 Times in 386 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FredLee View Post
If you just stack railroad ties without some way of pinning them together,they will push inward as you backfill with earth.If you look at the Russian small pole shelter,its designed so that backfilling actually locks the design together tighter.And its designed to flex from overpressure.
Railroad ties are heavy,too.Wouldn't be my first choice.Treated lumber has formeldihyde in it.
links? photos?
Old 03-15-2009, 05:46 PM
FredLee FredLee is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: michigan
Posts: 4,092
Thanks: 128
Thanked 2,142 Times in 1,180 Posts
Default

http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p933.htm
The Following User Says Thank You to FredLee For This Useful Post:
Old 03-15-2009, 05:51 PM
FredLee FredLee is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: michigan
Posts: 4,092
Thanks: 128
Thanked 2,142 Times in 1,180 Posts
Default

Seriously,Nuclear War Survival Skills should be in every American home.Right next to the family Bible. Its that good of a book. I highly recommend aquiring the tape or dvd set as well.Puts alot of the information into perspective.
Old 03-15-2009, 06:09 PM
Halkon's Avatar
Halkon Halkon is offline
PreparationInBubbaNation
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West TN
Posts: 2,469
Thanks: 6,624
Thanked 2,015 Times in 973 Posts
Default

Why not use cedar logs instead, they are resistan to rotting, without the creosote.

RR ties are also expensive
The Following User Says Thank You to Halkon For This Useful Post:
Old 08-26-2011, 05:59 PM
digschopper digschopper is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: tamworth,nh
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default RR tie bunker

while living 2 hrs from my isolated mobile home,it got broken into. i've put a lot of thought into a hardened bunker to store my expensive tools and equipment. i feel lucky as they cut the cords off the welder for copper rather than take the welder.
anyway,i live on a mountainside,so the plan is to dig into the pitch about 20 ft,pour a slab,and paint a tar "bead around the perimeter,about 5" wide. then the ties are stacked,alternating like a log home,and pinned with rebar.rather than covering it with dirt,the top row of ties exits grade,acting as a "footing" for an outbuilding on top. entrance is through shed floor. before backfilling,the log walls get tar-coated like a concrete foundation to waterfroof it.
a second,bigger door is accessed behind a staircase built into the bank leading to the shed up top. lift the stairs and there's a door big enough to get the atv through.we get taxed for a permanent foundation if we use concrete,so the idea is,if the assesor figures it out,i shouldn't be taxed.
Old 08-26-2011, 09:12 PM
Illini Warrior's Avatar
Illini Warrior Illini Warrior is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 7,230
Thanks: 24
Thanked 9,282 Times in 3,894 Posts
Default

alot of info and plans on root cellars ....... that's basically the same thing you're building
Old 08-27-2011, 03:54 PM
Wetwork's Avatar
Wetwork Wetwork is offline
Steel True Blade Straight
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Orygun
Posts: 795
Thanks: 912
Thanked 1,015 Times in 440 Posts
Default

There's a lot of con's to railroad ties, and not too many pro's. I know ties we've used them for 70 years or more on our ranch.

Con's
1. They heat up and stink to high heaven
2. The tar and creosote oozes out when they get warm. Figure on throwing away any clothing it gets on
3. They burn like thermite, and car tires. I'm talking the thickest black smoke with white hot inferno. You can't hardly put them out once they get going.
4. They are mother&^^%&*% heavy!
5. They cost like $15 and up each.
6. The Canadian ones aren't even trued, all wavy and knotty, if you plant one as a post you can't put the hole anywhere near where the barbwire or panels go. Some of them shaped like the letter's "C"and "L". I swear. They just slab off two sides and call'em good. I would be scared to ride a train in Canada!! And they weigh a ton more than American ones.
7. I don't know how safe veggies grown in raised beds with creosote oozing would be?

Pro's
1. They last forever almost. We have a bunch of fence posts with the tiny date spike from 1932, and they are still solid as a rock. I put in some corner posts as a kid at age 12, and they are still going strong and that was 37 years ago.

2. Bugs hate'em.

3. I've never seen a one ton bull bust one. They use'em big time on buffalo ranches.

That's about all I got. I just built a 8 post fence in one of our corrals with'em. It sucked and my back's still killing me.-WW
Old 09-24-2011, 11:55 PM
AFF's Avatar
AFF AFF is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 815
Thanks: 209
Thanked 516 Times in 279 Posts
Default

We used good but older railroad ties and newer ones ... they dry out ... yes they do dry out! Then they become a haven for bugs ... termites in particular! Just be careful. There is a formula floating around for radiation protection that is great all around ... i believe it is 18 inchs of "x" material or 12 inches of "y" material ... you get the idea. Look at the old Civil Defense info from the 50's through the 80's and even FEMA. One of the best things I have ever read was a manual put out by Oak Ridge Labs in the 50s, 60s, or 70s. It is full of what you are possibly looking for!
Old 11-14-2011, 08:53 PM
AFF's Avatar
AFF AFF is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 815
Thanks: 209
Thanked 516 Times in 279 Posts
Default

Did you ever build your bunker???
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net