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Old 01-27-2009, 01:51 PM
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Default How to tell if a plastic bucket is food grade?



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I have a bunch of "Homer" buckets I got from Home Depot. You know the ones, they are bright orange, plastic, 5 gal buckets. I use them for all sorts of stuff, they are very useful, have tight fitting lids, etc. I haven't used them for food, yet, because I can't determne if they are food grade or not. I doubt they are. How do you tell? How bad is it to store food in buckets that are not food grade?

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Old 01-27-2009, 01:58 PM
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Default Look on bottom

if it says HDPE 2 in a triangle, you are good to go. Check ou this site





*** EDIT ***

Try this sight instead

www.hdpe-containers.com/

Last edited by ROADKING1; 01-27-2009 at 02:12 PM..
Old 01-27-2009, 02:02 PM
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I buy HD buckets by the dozen and have almost everything packed in them, but i use mylar bags inside the pails. the 2 inside the arrows that are chasing each other on the bottom of the bucket is supposed to mean they are food grade, but i wouldn't use any buckets without mylar bags. you could do a search and ck out the different numbers.

Last edited by redflag; 01-28-2009 at 07:37 AM..
Old 01-27-2009, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROADKING1 View Post
if it says HDPE 2 in a triangle, you are good to go. Check ou this site


www.virtualweberbullet.com/plastics.html
from the site you listed
Not All HDPE Containers Are Food Grade

There is a common misconception that all containers made of white plastic or HDPE plastic bearing the symbol are food grade containers. This is not true.

If you are considering the purchase of a container from some place other than a kitchen or restaurant supply store, and the container is not clearly labeled as "food safe" or being made of food grade plastic, then you should assume that it is not food grade and you should not brine in it—unless you line it with a food grade plastic bag.
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redflag View Post
from the site you listed
Not All HDPE Containers Are Food Grade

There is a common misconception that all containers made of white plastic or HDPE plastic bearing the symbol are food grade containers. This is not true.

If you are considering the purchase of a container from some place other than a kitchen or restaurant supply store, and the container is not clearly labeled as "food safe" or being made of food grade plastic, then you should assume that it is not food grade and you should not brine in it—unless you line it with a food grade plastic bag.

True, I was just posting this link to show differenet types of grades. Was not trying to show anything on brining as the sight is states. It is just a breakdown of the types of plastics. "HDPE 2" is food grade, and safe for "STORING" dry goods. I always use mylar first anyway, then store in a bucket. Have been doing so for years now. Thanks for pointing that out though.
Old 01-27-2009, 06:12 PM
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Caution is key on this.

To save money, years ago we began cleaning and using gallon milk and water jugs as we emptied them. Granted, getting the beans, rice etc... into the jug is more time consuming, but it's cheap and safe. After one is full, we then cap it and seal with parafin wax. Another advantage is the light weight for transport. Anyone can load one into the truck.
Old 01-27-2009, 06:44 PM
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Caution is key on this.

To save money, years ago we began cleaning and using gallon milk and water jugs as we emptied them. Granted, getting the beans, rice etc... into the jug is more time consuming, but it's cheap and safe. After one is full, we then cap it and seal with parafin wax. Another advantage is the light weight for transport. Anyone can load one into the truck.
and aren't milk jugs now bi degradable so they rot out in a few yrs?
Old 01-28-2009, 07:34 AM
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and aren't milk jugs now bi degradable so they rot out in a few yrs?


Yes, they do break down over time, and are not a good reliable source for storing anything other than maybe water in the fridge for short term storage. I would NEVER use a milk jug for storing any food types for any length of time. They do make great pots for starting seedlings however.

It is easy, go to your local deli, or hamburger joint. Ask if they have any 5 gallon buckets they want to get rid of, they will give them to you. They are HDPE "2", food grade. Take home, wash with baking soda, rinse and set outside in the sun to get rid of pickle smell. Get some mylar sealing bags, (GOOGLE). Seal food in mylar, squeezing out all air, and adding enough oxygen absorbers, with an IRON set on highest temp without steam. Place in 5 gallon buckets, place on lid, hammer down with rubber mallet, and store. That is it!

Also great for storing ammo, clothing, bedding, dog food, and many other. Use your imagination!
Old 01-28-2009, 07:59 AM
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From

www.howtopackfood.com

Thursday, January 22, 2009
Food grade?
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Our free information sites-
www.survivalreport.com
www.bucketpacking.com

Food grade?

Their has been lots of discussion over buckets. What is food grade? Do I "need" food grade buckets? Do I "need" food grade buckets if I'm using mylar?

Some things in life can be skimped on. You can eat rice and beans daily and save yourself a pile of money on your grocery bills. You can move to a smaller house and learn that 2 people don't need a huge Chipboard McMansion to live in.

I try not to skimp when putting away food. Finding out that a container failed or that you have an infestation when rotating your food years from now may just be an inconvenience. Opening the food and finding this when you REALLY need the food- i.e, an emergency constitutes a good deal more than just an inconvenience.

Not to sidetrack but here again is where I think QUANTITY can help as well. If I'm convinced that all I need is 5 buckets of rice, 2 buckets of beans and that will make me good to go (don't follow that advice btw), and years later I find that 2 of the buckets of rice got infested and are no longer edible, I've effectively just cut my food storage by 1/3. That means 1/3 less time period where I have food to eat.

Let that sink in please.

Not to say that quantity alone can overcome a problem with poor packaging, nor SHOULD you purposely package poorly, but stuff DOES happen, and having a little more than even you "feel" like you need might save your bacon one day.

OK back on track....

Buckets- look on the bottom of the bucket for the three arrows chasing each other and a "2" in the center of it. This is HDPE 2. I know I know, someone will say "that doesn't make it food grade, rabble rabble rabble rabble!" I would tell you to call Ropak- the biggest bucket manufacturer in the U.S. and ask them what they would recommend for packaging grains. Then call Waltons, Honeyville or any of the professional packing houses that pack superpails and ask them what grade of bucket they use.

I'll save you some time here- HDPE2 is what is used.

"But it's NOT food grade, rabble rabble rabble rabble!"

Go and see Sally the counter gal at the local bakery. If your looking to pack food on the cheap, she is your new best friend. Ask to purchase for a small amount ($1-2. each) their used icing buckets. BEHOLD! What marking is on the bottom of those buckets? HDPE2! And just think, that icing wasn't packed in mylar liners, that FOOD (the icing) was in physical contact with the side of that HDPE2 bucket!

Firehouse subs sells their used pickle buckets for $2.00 Here again, these are HDPE2 buckets where the pickles were (GASP!) in physical contact with the side of the bucket.

Here is where the analytical types are going to freak- these buckets would not be considered "acorrding to Hoyle" food grade buckets, yet food that is eaten EVERY DAY is in physical contact with these buckets.

In short, if it's HELD FOOD IN IT and is HDPE2, it's "safe" to use.

What you DON'T want to use-

Buckets that have held ANYTHING with chemicals in it- cleansers, cleaners, acids, etc. I don't care if you are using mylars or not, stay away from stuff like this.

What MAY work with mylar-

Buckets that have held sheetrock mud. This cleans up with water and the buckets can be cleaned pretty well. IF and I want to understand that word, IF you are using mylar you might could get away with using old sheetrock mud buckets.

Personally, I would stick with bakery buckets, pickle buckets and/or buy new buckets.

5 gallon buckets can be purchased new at Lowes, Walmart and Home Despot. (pun intended). Where possible shoot for the white buckets. There's been a lot of hype about buckets with any type of coloring in them. Some folks think they are up there with Obama and the antiChrist... LOL

In my experience of storing food for 22 years, we have used MANY buckets that were green, red, even blue. Up till the later part of the 90's, our buckets were packed WITHOUT mylar as mylar and absorbers weren't readily accessible. Other than oxidation resulting from no oxygen barrier (that's what the mylar does, a bucket itself is NOT an effective oxygen barrier), we have seen NO problems with colored buckets. Your results may vary.

The important thing, especially late in the game, is to DO SOMETHING. If you over analyze things, their is a reason not to do anything. You can't allow yourself to get paralyzed into INACTION due to that.

Get moving, time might be short. Good luck.

Don't forget to "follow this blog" - see the button on the right. That way you will automatically get updates as we post them.

Feel free to post any questions/comments to the blog here or email me with them.

Robert
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