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Old 01-11-2009, 04:46 PM
3/325 3/325 is offline
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Smile Food Storage. How to? How much? What to store?



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Iíve noticed that a lot people have questions about food storage. Thereís a lot of good info on this forum I just thought Iíd add some resources and share some of what Iíve learned. Also condense some of the info into one thread.

If you are just starting out youíll want to add the basics first. It wonít be a great diet but it will support you. What Iím doing is accumulating 6 months worth at a time.
First I get grains & beans; because you can live on just these, though it is rather boring. Then dehydrated/freeze dried: milk, eggs, veggies, & fruit.

After you get a yearís worth of food add specialty stuff like; cheese powder, dessert items, spices, freeze dried meat, soup mixes, bread mix, etc. What is six months worth?? Well here are a few calculators.
http://lds.about.com/library/bl/faq/blcalculator.htm
http://www.providentliving.org/conte...4070-1,00.html
Basically it comes out to 25lb grains, wheat-rice-etc, and 5lbs of legumes, beans-lentils-etc. per person per month. Most of this info comes from the Mormon church, Iím not Mormon but do check out their websites because they are a great source of info.

Rice, beans, lard (it has a very long shelf life), and pasta can be had at Cosco or SamsClub cheaply. Wheat, barley, millet (similar to grits), and corn is available in bulk at feed supply stores or sometimes health food stores (usually expensive though). The Safeway near me has lentils and barley for less than $1 per pound!

When you get your rice, wheat, beans or whatever youíll want to pack them in mylar & 5 gal buckets with oxygen absorbers for long-term storage. If you donít then their shelf life will only be about a year.
Here are some good sources for packaging food:
http://www.youtube.com/user/delta69alpha how to
http://www.shopsimplerliving.com/ mylar bags, oxygen absorbers, etc
https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/e...orage_bags.htm mylar bags, oxygen absorbers

Why do I stock up on freeze dried milk, veggies, fruit, etc instead of canned?? Freeze dried can be expensive if you start getting pre-made meals but it is cheap if you just get the basic items; IE..1year worth of veggies for one person can be bought for $100. FD items are lighter, no water, and last longer, typical shelf life of fruits & veggies is 15-30 years. Canned goods have an average shelf life of 2yrs and they are heavy!

Though I stock up on FD fruits/veggies you should learn how to garden and get canning supplies; however, even if you can and garden you should get some freeze dried items.

I attached a good article on building up food storage. It even has budgets and timelines. Here are some suppliers:
http://www.yourfoodstorage.com/products
http://www.jrhenterprises.com/category.sc?categoryId=2
http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront much more than just MREs!!
http://stores.ebay.com/Gwens-Store
http://www.shopsimplerliving.com/
http://www.nitro-pak.com/


Hope some of this helps you guys.
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File Type: doc Food_storage_part 2.doc (355.0 KB, 310 views)
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Old 01-11-2009, 05:01 PM
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If you are going to store powdered stuff; flour, powdered cheese, eggs, milk, bread mix, etc you need to either buy it pre-packaged or with a moisture content below 12% ( I believe). MREdepot.com has powdered items; IE cheese in 40lb bags that has a very low moisture content you can package yourself to save money.

Corn.. it is great and everyone wants to grow it (myself included)… but… honestly wheat, barley, rye, and other grains should be grown first. Why?? A couple of reasons: Corn is actually pretty low in protein and you can not live on just corn. Grains like wheat, barely, etc are grasses; they require very little fertilizer or water when compared with corn.

Also wheat, barley, & rye can be stored longer and easier. If SHTF and you are growing corn you will deplete your soil very quickly and not be able to get more fertilizer unless you have animals. The protein content of wheat is very high and you can live of just wheat, it would suck though.

I’m not saying “don’t grow corn”. Just that you should be growing more wheat, barley, rye, and other grains first. Also a decent mill should be on your list.
For seeds you want heirloom:
http://www.bountifulgardens.org/ has a variety of wheat, rye, and many other grains
http://www.rickharrison.com/texts/info/seedsources.html is a list of seed sources


Oh one more thing. Popcorn. It is cheap in bulk!! And can be used in a couple different ways; either pop it or grind it into maize.

Last edited by 3/325; 01-11-2009 at 07:05 PM.. Reason: added links
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Old 01-11-2009, 07:55 PM
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Another grain that is easy to grow, and has multiple uses is amaranth. First off, it is a grain, so it can be used for breads, etc. Amaranth tends to be very drought tolerant, so it does not require the massive amounts of water that corn and some other grains do. Next, there are varieties such as the red, which can also be used as a dye for fabrics. It is very pretty and ornamental looking, so it can be incorporated into your landscape design (even right out in the front yard), and the nosy neighbors don't have to know that you are growing it for the grain! If you want to get experience growing it, but don't necessarily want to harvest the grain, the local bird population will be very pleased to use it as a food source all winter long.
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:08 PM
Leogrl82 Leogrl82 is offline
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I was also going to suggest amaranth and quinoa. These can be grown very easily, and they're super nutritious. Quinoa is a complete protein, and amaranth can be grown for it's nutritious greens as well as it's seeds. They're also gluten free if anyone here has family members who are intolerant to gluten or wheat.
Quinoa: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...spice&dbid=142
Growing amaranth and quinoa:http://www.saltspringseeds.com/scoop/powerfood.htm

The other thing I wanted to say was coconut oil is extremely nutritious- it's very high in lauric acid which is good for brain development (who couldn't use that in a SHTF scenario?), and antifungal, has a very long shelf life, and is extremely stable- it won't go rancid very quickly. It's also has the highest smoke point of any oil, so it can be used in all manner of cooking (unlike olive oil which really shouldn't be heated- it goes rancid very quickly), and you can buy large amounts of it at tropical traditions. And I swear, I don't work for them, I just really love it.
Coconut oil in bulk: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/vi...oconut_oil.htm
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IceFire View Post
Another grain that is easy to grow, and has multiple uses is amaranth. First off, it is a grain, so it can be used for breads, etc. Amaranth tends to be very drought tolerant, so it does not require the massive amounts of water that corn and some other grains do.

the local bird population will be very pleased to use it as a food source all winter long.
Quite right. The Bountifull Garden link has alot of grains! And the birds will make a nice food source as well!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leogrl82 View Post
I was also going to suggest amaranth and quinoa. These can be grown very easily, and they're super nutritious. Quinoa is a complete protein, and amaranth can be grown for it's nutritious greens as well as it's seeds. They're also gluten free if anyone here has family members who are intolerant to gluten or wheat.
Quinoa: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...spice&dbid=142
Growing amaranth and quinoa:http://www.saltspringseeds.com/scoop/powerfood.htm

The other thing I wanted to say was coconut oil is extremely nutritious- it's very high in lauric acid which is good for brain development (who couldn't use that in a SHTF scenario?)

Coconut oil in bulk: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/vi...oconut_oil.htm
Thanks for the link! Bountiful gardens has a wide variety of different wheats and grains. They have an ancient wheat breed that has 16% protein. Quinoa is also a good one.
Old 01-11-2009, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leogrl82 View Post

The other thing I wanted to say was coconut oil is extremely nutritious- it's very high in lauric acid which is good for brain development (who couldn't use that in a SHTF scenario?), and antifungal, has a very long shelf life, and is extremely stable- it won't go rancid very quickly. It's also has the highest smoke point of any oil, so it can be used in all manner of cooking (unlike olive oil which really shouldn't be heated- it goes rancid very quickly), and you can buy large amounts of it at tropical traditions. And I swear, I don't work for them, I just really love it.
Coconut oil in bulk: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/vi...oconut_oil.htm
I use coconut oil for my daughter's meals but I've had quite a resistance from the rest of the family (my partner and step-kids) when it comes to the flavor. I will admit it to y'all but deny it at home, but I agree. It's a crazy flavor to get used to but knowing how healthy it is I'm trying. I like the flavor when I pop popcorn, use it instead of other oils in baking and when I fry up pancakes, but otherwise it's tough to swallow. And hard to sneak in. I can usually sneak organ meat into sloppy joes but they always catch the coconut oil
Old 01-11-2009, 09:14 PM
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thanks for the information...

Which grains have you personally grown? and which did you have the best luck with?
Old 01-11-2009, 09:16 PM
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Wow, I've never noticed the flavor. The only problem I have with it, is when I REALLY want butter instead. There is NO fat that tastes better than butter! (which is why I plan on canning some, or making some ghee). But I can't taste it in baked goods, or in things I saute. But, I do like the flavor of coconut, so maybe that's it?

Oh, and it is REALLY good for pancakes- texture like no other cooking fat I've ever had!
Old 01-12-2009, 07:03 PM
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thanks for the information...

Which grains have you personally grown? and which did you have the best luck with?
I don't have enough room right now to grow any grains; however, I'm moving shortly and will have more of a yard. Last couple months I've been gathering all the info I can in anticipation of growing some wheat & barley.
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Old 01-13-2009, 07:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Micah525 View Post
thanks for the information...

Which grains have you personally grown? and which did you have the best luck with?
Grains aren't super tough to grow as long as you do some local research and experiment a little bit. Check with your local AG extension for planting dates (they will vary from area to area). Plant close to these dates if possible.

Some of the wheat we grow is simply scattered on the ground before a rain. Most is disked in, in the larger areas. Ditto with oats.

Most of these are of the grass family, if they were that hard to grow mankind would have died out 7,000 years ago.

Lowdown3
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Old 01-13-2009, 09:42 AM
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I am very impressed with those sites thank you.
Old 01-14-2009, 09:17 PM
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great post thanks a lot!!!!!!!
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:57 AM
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Is oats easier to grow and process (make ready to eat), than wheat?
Isn't oats also more nutritious and filling?
Many seed sites don't seem to carry oats. I wonder why?
Anyone have a good source on oats?
Old 01-15-2009, 05:34 AM
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Let's see from fall of 2009 to fall of 2012. In other words, about 3 years of food might see you through the upcoming trouble. Less if Obama's administration can work a true miracle. If not, as expected, then you may even need slightly more food than 3 years' worth. It's anybody's guess right now but 3 years would or may be the practical minimum.
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Old 01-15-2009, 06:15 AM
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If you are planning on growing amaranth, do the research into what seeds you are buying. Amaranth is raised to be either a grain plant or a greens plant. If you are looking to grow it for grains make certain you are buying the grain seeds and the same for the greens. Don't buy ornamental amaranth because you won't get much in grains from it and the greens are not as good. Also check with your local ag extention office because if may already be growing wild in your area. This can be a good thing as you can get free seeds or it may be bad if you buy seeds and you get cross pollination, then seed collecting for replanting is not adviced.

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Old 01-15-2009, 07:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlieb View Post
Is oats easier to grow and process (make ready to eat), than wheat?
Isn't oats also more nutritious and filling?
Many seed sites don't seem to carry oats. I wonder why?
Anyone have a good source on oats?
Oats have a hull that requires processing. I grow oats mainly for the rabbits and chickens.

I would say wheat was easier to process than oats. Oats will do better in wetter areas than wheat will. Last year we had some wheat in one of our growing areas that tends to be a little wet. It sprouted, came up about ankle high then we got a good bit of rain. The area stayed wet for a long time and the wheat died out. Oats will tolerate wet a little better than wheat does, IMO.

Here's how you will process the wheat after you cut it-

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Old 01-17-2009, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlieb View Post
Is oats easier to grow and process (make ready to eat), than wheat?
Isn't oats also more nutritious and filling?
Many seed sites don't seem to carry oats. I wonder why?
Anyone have a good source on oats?
Oats vs wheat or whatever is more of an opinion. Lowdown had some good points. Grains of any sort are a good thing to learn how to grow.
Old 01-28-2009, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leogrl82 View Post
I was also going to suggest amaranth and quinoa. These can be grown very easily, and they're super nutritious. Quinoa is a complete protein, and amaranth can be grown for it's nutritious greens as well as it's seeds. They're also gluten free if anyone here has family members who are intolerant to gluten or wheat.
Quinoa: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...spice&dbid=142
Growing amaranth and quinoa:http://www.saltspringseeds.com/scoop/powerfood.htm
I know they sell 0.05$ a pound of Quinoa in Bolivia. If anyone wants to buy in Bulk of 100 or even 1000 I suggest you go to Bolivia itself and buy from the merchants, but I don't know what the price would be nor the taxes for hauling that much material into the states. All I know is that those companies that are hauling Quinoa directly into the states are hoarding some hefty profits. Than again "I don't know what the price would be nor the taxes for hauling that much material into the states."

But who knows if its worth the trouble for a typical American. Theres the language barrier, cultural and the possibility of being kidnapped.

Update: 1 Ton of Quinoa in Bolivia would cost 15$ American Dollars O.O

Last edited by Dentatus; 01-28-2009 at 05:49 PM..
Old 01-29-2009, 01:45 AM
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No sht? I wonder what kindof tariffs, inspection fees, etc one would have to pay? It might be worthwile to do it.
Old 01-29-2009, 09:26 AM
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I think its hilarious that a lot of people on this site, believe that freezing food, will do you a lick of good when TSHTF. What do you plan on running your freezer off of, when there is no electricity? It is my firm opinion, that the best way for long term food storage is canning, and to smoke or jerky your meat. With this method, I've had foods last for 3 or 4 years Only because I can so much it takes me that long to get around to eating it. But I honestly believe that it would last for years longer. Also to store dried beans and rice, and such. From that point, you can build a Can House, and a Spring House (provided you have access to a fresh spring or creek) to keep your food cool. You don't even need electricity to can food. Only the cans and seals.
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