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Old 11-22-2013, 02:32 PM
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Default Clay pot space heater...does it work?



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Has anyone had any experience with these? I have one room in my house i would like warmer than the rest, but I don't want to jack up my electric bill with a space heater. Any input would be appreciated

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Old 11-22-2013, 05:38 PM
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I haven't tried them but they sound great. I could have used them last year when we were without power for 4 days after Hurricaine Sandy. I like the idea of this flower pot/candle heater where the pots are not bolted together.
Read carefully the warning at the end of the article. Open flames are dangerous. Tony

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Old 11-22-2013, 05:40 PM
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Works well with kerosene lantern, too.... You'll need to make sure the pot is high enough off the floor to keep the kerosene reservoir from overheating. I use this in the leg well of a desk that's set up in a very drafty shop building. Does a good job of keeping the legs and feet warm.
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Old 11-22-2013, 05:44 PM
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Looks too small and not enough BTU'S to make a difference.
Maybe okay for a well insulated closet, but who wants to breath in the fumes?
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:06 PM
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The clay pot works well with a large candle when deployed in a tent, but for safety do this alone so you don't have to worry about someone else kicking it over. The smaller the tent, the more heat.
Old 11-22-2013, 07:11 PM
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Back quite a few yrs ago, my OTR trucker son got stranded in N. Dakato during a blizzard. He figured out how to bend his knees, and spread his legs.... he placed it there, and wrapped himself with a blanket, with the candle heater included.

It got him thru 18 hrs of being stranded. (it did take several tea candles, but it WORKED)
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:36 PM
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Looks like it could get hot enough to cook off of you may have to add another flat metal surface to it or balance a can of whatever on it .
Old 11-22-2013, 07:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerald Eyes View Post
Back quite a few yrs ago, my OTR trucker son got stranded in N. Dakato during a blizzard. He figured out how to bend his knees, and spread his legs.... he placed it there, and wrapped himself with a blanket, with the candle heater included.

It got him thru 18 hrs of being stranded. (it did take several tea candles, but it WORKED)
Tip; Using one LARGE candle eliminates the problem of losing heat when you burn thru your tea lite candle and have to start another.
Keeping your body core temp up is key to staying alive...
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:57 PM
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There's another thread here somewhere on this subject, so a couple weeks ago I got out the candles and flower pots and etc. and gave it a try.

Long story short if you were trying to heat a very small space, like a closet, it would probably help. In a room measuring 18x24' with a standard 8' ceiling and closed off from the rest of the house, it did no good whatsoever even after several hours and several candles. I even tried larger candles and taking the outer pot off thinking the inner pot would throw more heat, but it wasn't worth the effort.
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Old 11-22-2013, 10:47 PM
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I guess I am missing the point. Unless the design accelerates the burn (consumes fuel faster) or increases the efficiency of the burn (greater heat yield for a given amount of fuel) it really does nothing to change the amount of heat available. The design does not appear to do either. The laws of thermodynamics remain the same.
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Old 11-22-2013, 10:49 PM
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From looking around a "typical" candle puts out 12.6 lumens of light. That means that:

(12.6 lumens/W) * (1 W/ 0.1 lumen) = 126 W

So your candle heater is proximate to a 125 watt bulb for heat. If you run a 125 watt light bulb for 24 hours the electricity would be 3kWh or about 30 cents a day (if you pay 10 cents per kWh). How much would you pay to burn candles for the day?

Chances are you would need 6 candles burning all the time to heat the room up significantly. I believe a candle is about equal to the heat given off by one person. So just ask a bunch of friends over.
Old 11-23-2013, 03:44 AM
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Wonderful, the clay pot gets hot! If you are cold and huddle around the clay pot you will like it, but there is no heat gain or savings overall.
Old 11-23-2013, 09:29 AM
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My son and I made one of these last night and ran this little experiment:

1) The video we'd seen had 3 nested pots - that's what we used.

2) Trying to use what we had here, our bolt was only about 2 1/4" long.

3) We balanced the finished pot on 3 four ounce jelly jars.

4) The candle jar itself was roughly twice the height of the jelly jars and had about 3/4 of the candle left in it when we started. This was a homemade type candle that was a gift.

5) We set it dead center on my round kitchen table that is 42" diameter. Figured this would give us a good measuring point.

6) Space setup: The dining room is not an enclosed room. It is the 'corner' of an L shape, with the smaller end being the kitchen and the larger end being the living room and leading to the rest of the house.

---
Notes:

- The the top of bolt was too hot to the touch after roughly 10 minutes.

- The outer pot was toasty warm and giving off heat after about 45 minutes. Too hot to place your hands on after roughly an hour and a half.

- The area within the diameter of the table was noticeably warmer than the rest of the house.

- Outside the diameter of the table, I could feel a very, very small temp difference at about 1 foot away and nothing after that. My son swears the whole dining room (roughly 12x9) was warmer as he walked through to the kitchen.

- I think this setup would have warmed an enclosed 12x9 space, maybe not to the point of 'toasty' with a single heater pot setup.

---
We'll run it again tonight with just 2 pots and post the results here.

It will also be interesting to try with a longer bolt and note any differences, but I'd like to see the difference changing one variable at a time. Will give a call to a few friends to see if anyone has a digital temp gauge I can borrow.

Our reason for the test: We are in a rental with no fireplace. We have a gas furnace, but the igniter runs on electricity. Unfortunately, the stove and oven are also electric. We wanted to test this for a backup source of heat in the event the power goes out during the winter, not for a money saving option.

Last edited by firebirdx; 11-23-2013 at 09:48 AM.. Reason: added notes on space setup
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Old 11-23-2013, 10:25 AM
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It is not all that difficult to do the math on these things. If you have your electric bill (if you use electric heat) for the year you can see what the costs are for running your furnace during the colder months.
1 kWh =3412 BTU/hr

If on your electric bill, during cold days, it has risen by lets say 1000kWh for the month. That means your electric furnace put out 3,412,000 BTU/hrs during that month. If you want to replace the electric furnace you need to develop those BTU's someway else. You can not get by with less and still have the same heating.

Whether you use NG, propane, electricity, wood, coal, candles or magic thermal mass designs, the BTU's must equal the same in order to have the same level of warmth in your home. The only way you can change that is to increase insulation. Or put up with it being colder. Sweaters come to mind.
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Old 11-23-2013, 10:33 AM
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There's another version here. http://www.naturalcuresnotmedicine.c...cents-day.html
Old 11-23-2013, 01:20 PM
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The average candle gives off between 200-400BTUS and burning one for an hour will only be 200-400BTU/HRS.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:45 PM
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Similar setups were used in the days of yore in hen houses and I think they were called 'artificial hens'. It would not be fun to have to go out and replace the candle periodically but in The Olden Days everything was labor intensive, so... I also saw in a book, forget which one, maybe '5 Acres and Independance' or one of the Orange Judd publishers books about homesteading, they used a low watt light bulb under a flower pot to make an electric hen replacement.
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6556 View Post
The average candle gives off between 200-400BTUS and burning one for an hour will only be 200-400BTU/HRS.
To help put this in context, average human body will generate about 340 BTU/hour.

So you would need a lot of candles.
Old 11-25-2013, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpp View Post
To help put this in context, average human body will generate about 340 BTU/hour.

So you would need a lot of candles.
or a lot of hot babes?
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:51 PM
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Quote:
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or a lot of hot babes?
Yep! That pretty much sums it up. Very nice!
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