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Old 09-27-2013, 02:36 AM
sgltrk sgltrk is offline
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Default Tanto point



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I haven't paid much attention to knives for years now and am trying to catch up with what's out there now. I'm sure this has been discussed but I haven't found it so;

What, if any, are the advantages and drawbacks to a Tanto point as opposed to a clip point or drop point knife? Is it just an appearance, cool samurai look, preference?

SGLTRK
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Old 09-27-2013, 02:52 AM
sojurn87 sojurn87 is offline
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Tanto point has a very strong tip for penetration.

Primarily for self defense.

Pain to sharpen, but doable.

That's about all I got.
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Old 09-27-2013, 03:00 AM
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Tanto has great strength for stabbing but 'slicing up on exit' isn't quite as easy as I like (read: major PIA AND it slows you down).. I sharpen the false edge on my bowies so it's useful going both ways without having to twist my wrist 180 degrees..

In the end - it's all a matter of personal choice and what you're trained/comfortable with if you're proficient and happy with a single edge it's six-of-one/half-dozen of the other in my experience.
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:46 AM
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I was wondering the same thing. Found this interesting YT video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nki-NHqS_qU
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgltrk View Post
I haven't paid much attention to knives for years now and am trying to catch up with what's out there now. I'm sure this has been discussed but I haven't found it so;

What, if any, are the advantages and drawbacks to a Tanto point as opposed to a clip point or drop point knife? Is it just an appearance, cool samurai look, preference?

SGLTRK
You didn't even try, very hard, did you? Just typing the word "tanto" into the search above and you get five hundred (500) threads--not posts, threads dealing with the matter...BTW--that's the maximum the search engine can display.

Google "tanto knives wiki" gives out 111,000 hits and this information from
Wiki is quite good
Quote:
Modern tantō: Modern tactical knives have been made by knife makers Bob Lum, Phill Hartsfield, Ernest Emerson, Allen Elishewitz, Bob Terzuola, Strider Knives, Benchmade, Spyderco, Severtech, Ka-Bar, SOG Knives, and Cold Steel. These "American Tantō" designs feature a thick spine on the blade that goes from the tang to the tip for increased tip strength. The handle shape may be altered slightly to provide better ergonomics.
Define tanto please? Which version? True Japanese or the Americanized tip that guys like Lynn Thompson et al have been pushing.

Japanese tanto knives--with one exception (Shinogi: the broken sword tip)--had normal, everyday (look like a paring knife) blade and came in two versions--with or without a guard...They were the EDC knives of nearly everyone including samurai as they weren't considered swords, which only samurai could carry.

The Americanized Tip is a sword point mounted as a small knife and it makes an excellent stabbing blade for offensive things like sentry removal but are truly poor choices for a self defence knife as it has little (which does not mean non-existent) belly for slashing...They are also horrible as an outdoors knife...As an EDC knife they are very good as that tip makes cutting articles out of newspapers or magazines really easy and they're okay for use on a steak or chop

These are true tantos.

Kris Cutlery HIRA-ZUKURI


Kris Cutlery TANTO - OSORAKU ZUKURI

These were superbly made American modernized tanto tip knives by Tom Johanning

Tac 11


Outrage 2 -- more in line of a spear point than a tanto

This is Cold Steels:
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Old 09-28-2013, 12:21 AM
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I found that the line of Tactical Tanto put out by CRKT and James Williams offer up a very good value as well. my newest procurement s the Hisshou and Hissatsu follow the Osoraku blade tip. What I found is this "Yes"; made in China ( Honestly you could have fooled me), these blades are not thin or fragile, they are every bit as tough as I expected them to be (and even a little more), Basically the Hisshou carries the weight of a small Wakizashi in a 13" blade while the Hissatsu is a no nonsense practical defensive blade both having a Zero grind edge. If you were to ask me a few years ago I would have laughed at you for offering up a fighting knife with no guard; after getting comfortable with both of these The old saying only fighting knives have double guards is no more. The tips allow for an almost seamless no resistance effort on my part to sink these midway through most testing material,caution should always cap the thumb over the cap of the handle with a firm grip. do yourself a favor and at least try one of these out, you won't have to go San-Mai or some other wierd steel that costs a fortune to get a great value.
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Old 09-28-2013, 02:39 AM
sgltrk sgltrk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeekHer View Post
You didn't even try, very hard, did you? Just typing the word "tanto" into the search above and you get five hundred (500) threads--not posts, threads dealing with the matter...BTW--that's the maximum the search engine can display.

I suppose "very hard" is a matter of opinion. I did not say I found nothing. My question was not about Tanto type blades in general but, very specifically, the advantages/drawbacks of the Tanto point compared to other types of points. I guess you were in such a hurry to vent your bile you didn't get that.

Google "tanto knives wiki" gives out 111,000 hits and this information from
Wiki is quite good


Define tanto please? Which version? True Japanese or the Americanized tip that guys like Lynn Thompson et al have been pushing.

Again you seem to be in a rush to be judgmental. I stated that I had not paid much attention to knives for years, which, means I was seeking info re: these "new to me" Tanto type points. The last combat knife I bought and used for its designed purpose was a Gerber Mark II back in 1970. I also used a custom bowie style knife made for my father during WW II. He carried it in WW II and Korea while in UDT. My brother carried it in Viet Nam, then it was my turn, then my brother again for his second tour. The above information is to enhance your perspective of my background. The background from, which, my question was posed. A question you obviously considered to be especially ignorant. You were correct. It was ignorance on my part. Dispelling ignorance is one of the reasons why people ask questions.

Japanese tanto knives--with one exception (Shinogi: the broken sword tip)--had normal, everyday (look like a paring knife) blade and came in two versions--with or without a guard...They were the EDC knives of nearly everyone including samurai as they weren't considered swords, which only samurai could carry.

The Americanized Tip is a sword point mounted as a small knife and it makes an excellent stabbing blade for offensive things like sentry removal but are truly poor choices for a self defence knife as it has little (which does not mean non-existent) belly for slashing...They are also horrible as an outdoors knife...As an EDC knife they are very good as that tip makes cutting articles out of newspapers or magazines really easy and they're okay for use on a steak or chop

These are true tantos.

Kris Cutlery HIRA-ZUKURI


Kris Cutlery TANTO - OSORAKU ZUKURI

These were superbly made American modernized tanto tip knives by Tom Johanning

Tac 11


Outrage 2 -- more in line of a spear point than a tanto

This is Cold Steels:
Thank you for some very good information.

Would that you had simply offered your knowledge and saved your ad hominem attacks. Clearly you posses a fund of knowledge. If you wish to share it you may find your audience more receptive if you don't try to demean them with your vitriol and disdain. Yes, I could have slogged through 500 hundred threads looking for the specific info I was after. But that could have taken hours and I chose not to commit that time. If that makes me lazy or some sort of miscreant in your eyes so be it. I can live with that. If you found my inquiry so objectionable, a waste of your time, a personal affront, then why respond at all?

Despite your rudeness you have provided valuable information. It broadened my understanding of what Tanto, in general, refers to. Your information and that of the others has helped me understand the "Americanized Tanto" point type of blade does not fulfill my needs.

There seems little point in pursuing this thread any longer. Thank you, to all of you that responded.

SGLTRK
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:41 AM
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Well, despite Seekher’s perceived rude post, he puts out good info. I personally think the newer generations of tactical/tanto designed knife blades are more for marketing than any specific performance advantage.

I do own a few; TOPS, Strider, Hinderer, Benchmade/Emerson, etc. but generally prefer more traditional drop, clip or spear-pointed blades. With that said, I’ve successfully used tanto blades for all the same cutting tasks I would perform with a traditional bushcraft knife and I really don’t think there’s much difference in performance. At the end of the day, it’s just another bladed tool and performance is more dependent on the user and technique than design. If the blade design appeals to you and you would be willing to invest the dirt time at putting it to task, I don't see any reason it wouldn't serve your hunting, camping or bushcraft chores...

ROCK6
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Old 10-03-2013, 04:03 PM
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One of the first knives I ever bought for myself as a kid was an Explorer tanto, with a 440A steel blade, full tang rubber grip and leather sheath. Over the years, I've remained partial to the tanto shape regardless of brand. While it's not the best for every task, I've found it pretty useful in my daily duties. Although I have some of the more common brands represented (Ka-Bar, Cold Steel, Gerber, etc.) one of my favorites is a Tekut Ares tanto that I think cost all of $20 with a nice sheath. Best bang for the buck is the Gerber Yari with S30V blade if you can still find one for around $60.
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