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Old 09-24-2013, 07:46 AM
glassman66 glassman66 is offline
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Default Making gravy with powdered milk?



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Hey all, this weekend I decided I would make some sausage gravy with powdered milk. I really didn't care for the taste myself, although my kids didn't seem to mind. I made the milk and used it right away, maybe better if I had waited? It was also just great value from wally world so maybe that had something to do with it as well.

What is your all's experience? I am not going to give up gravy if things go to hell!





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Old 09-24-2013, 07:49 AM
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You don't need milk to make gravy. Look up some recipes, tons out there.
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Old 09-24-2013, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve28 View Post
You don't need milk to make gravy. Look up some recipes.
You need milk for milk gravy, sometimes called cream gravy. That's the base gravy for a lot of different types but sausage gravy is the most well known.

=======

In answer to the OP on rehydrating powdered milk and gravy, no you don't need to let the milk set up for gravy. Most powdered milk is a non-fat milk so you do need to allow for a little extra fat in the gravy to keep it as rich as milk gravy usually is.

I just mix the milk up in the mixing cup and then pour it in the skillet.
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Old 09-24-2013, 10:13 AM
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In my experience with powdered milk (used to sell the stuff); It will taste significantly better if aerated during mixing. Make it up by the quart in a blender, or in bowl of cereal sized quantities, shake it, along with the water, in a small sealed bottle or jar. Use it quickly; make it up on demand the aeration will go away if stored for a couple of hours.
Never tried it for gravy, works fine unaerated for baking.

Enjoy!
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Old 09-24-2013, 11:11 AM
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One of the things I've discovered about powdered milk is that the mix ratio on the package is rarely correct, at least for my tastes. So I tinker with the ratio until I get it right. Just slightly lean and it tastes watery, and slightly right makes it taste malty and sweet which I hate. But the right ratio tastes pretty good. And it really does need to sit in the fridge overnight or at least a couple hours. This improves the taste a lot.

I find that it tends to take a little more salt and spices to make a good gravy with powdered milk too. It's a little more bland than regular milk.

Another critical issue is fat. Since powdered milk has none, you'll have to make sure there is enough in the drippings. If you're making a gravy from a roux, then you probably have plenty. But if you're making a gravy from a slurry, make sure your drippings have enough fat.
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Old 09-24-2013, 11:38 AM
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I envy you people that can make good milk gravy. I've tried numerous times and have never succeeded in making any that was eatable.

A short true story.

When I was living in the Florida Keys on my sailboat, I had a woman named Leslie, that would come down about every other month and spend 10 days with me on the boat. We would sail around the keys and just have a good time in general.

We were anchored out in the Marquesas. One morning I decided I wanted some gravy to go with the biscuits. Leslie was even worse a cook than I am, so I figured I'd give it a try.

I got out my little 8" skillet, put a little bacon grease in it, a couple of fork fulls of flour, an started adding the milk. Things started looking pretty good, and I kept stirring. In a few seconds, it started to grow. I wasn't too worried but had Leslie grab my 12" skillet just in case. She barely made it with the 12" skillet before the gravy was starting to run over the sides of the little one. It all got dumped into the 12"er. I kept stirring, and it kept growing. Within a few seconds, it was out growing the 12"er. Luckily, I had an 18"er, and a 24"er, stuffed down in the bilge. I had Leslie pull up the floorboards and grab them real quick. The whole mess got dumped into the 18"er, and it continued to grow. Keep in mind, since the 8"er, I had not added anything. It wasn't more than a few seconds till I needed the 24"er. When it had grown to fill the 24"er I was starting to get worried, so I shut off the fire. Thankfully, it then quit growing.

Leslie and I stood there watching it for a few minutes hoping it wouldn't grow anymore before either one of us could work up the nerve to taste it. One little taste, we looked at each other and agreed that it wasn't eatable. I picked up the skillet, went to the side of the boat and tipped it up to pour it out. It wouldn't pour. I finally had to turn it completely upside down and whack the bottom of the skillet to get it to come out. The gravy dropped out of the skillet in one big lump. That lump hit the water from a 6' drop, made a huge splash, and sank straight to the bottom. It was still perfectly skillet shaped when it stopped on the bottom in 7' of water.

We stayed anchored there for a week. The gravy was still there, just the same as when it first landed on the bottom, when we left. Even the fish and crabs wouldn't touch it. That was 15 years ago, and I would'nt be a bit surprised if it was still there,,,,,,,,, just like I left it.

I've never tried to make milk gravy again. I'm scared to death that next time, it will not ever stop growing, and end up taking over the world...
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Old 09-24-2013, 12:33 PM
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I love milk gravy & have it quite often. Ever tried canning milk? Its good. When milk is marked down or on sale , can it in pints/quarts for the winter or make mozzarella cheese with it.
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Old 09-24-2013, 12:36 PM
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how about dehydrated buttermilk? I used some to make a banana bread and was normal tasting.
Old 09-24-2013, 12:51 PM
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I tried using reconstituted powdered milk in sausage gravy one time and didn't care for it. I usually use canned evaporated milk for sausage gravy if I don't have fresh milk available. I just add the can of milk and a 1/2 can of water - it tastes really good.
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Old 09-24-2013, 01:00 PM
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You have to have about 1/4 more fat for good cream gravy when using powdered milk, so when you get the fat and the flour mixed together it will be a "greasier" looking texture than usual. I also add a bit extra salt and double the black pepper. My family would like to thank you for the gravy they're having with lunch so I could go play and get a better idea for what I throw in the skillet.
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Old 09-24-2013, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mels thinkingitover View Post
You have to have about 1/4 more fat for good cream gravy when using powdered milk, so when you get the fat and the flour mixed together it will be a "greasier" looking texture than usual. I also add a bit extra salt and double the black pepper. My family would like to thank you for the gravy they're having with lunch so I could go play and get a better idea for what I throw in the skillet.
That's about what I figure too. Cooking is all about tasting as you go, so I don't really measure much.
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Old 09-24-2013, 03:05 PM
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CaptTurk, I feel your pain ... I had a similar experience when I was in junior high school. My dad's hunting dogs wouldn't touch the stuff ... He said he'd never seen gravy that a dog wouldn't eat ...

I finally got the hang of it but it took a LONG, LONG time and I still have days where things don't go like they ought to. I dunno ... gravy making just ain't my thing, I guess ...
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Old 09-24-2013, 03:06 PM
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Never used milk in my sausage or any other gravy. I have used butter to make a rue (roux) but most sausage has enough fat to just use flour and ice water. I remove all of the meat, use broth to deglaze the pan, strain and then wisk in a 50/50 mixture of very cold water and flour until I get the consistency I am looking for. The flour mixture should be added when the broth is at a rolling boil. (It sometimes helps to also strain the flour mixture.) You could also deglaze with beer or dry wine.
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Old 09-24-2013, 03:18 PM
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I used powdered milk the other week to make sausage gravy. It tasted good to me. I used the carnation stuff. It was also about 2 years out of date.
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Old 09-24-2013, 03:18 PM
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If I use powdered milk for gravy I like to have made up the milk earlier and let sit in the refrigerator for a few hours. I simply use a quart size mason jar and a quart size package of powdered milk. Add the powder, fill the jar with water, put a cover on and shake like heck.

The only secret to a milk gravy is to not scorch (thus curdle) the milk. You stop heating it when it reaches the desired thickness. It takes constant stirring to prevent scorching.
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:12 PM
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it's seems some people have the knack for mak'en good gravy. Most don't. Of course my mother made the absolute bestest gravy in the world..

I'm still afraid to try again.... I don't wanta destroy the world..
Old 09-24-2013, 05:16 PM
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Gravy of any kind is good. It should have it's own food group.
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:33 PM
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Yup! Doo Dah you are 99.99% correct. Just not mine. Gravy is good on anything,,,, well, maybe not anything. Icecream, jello, cinamon rolls, not so much. Pretty much anything else though.
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Turk View Post
it's seems some people have the knack for mak'en good gravy. Most don't. Of course my mother made the absolute bestest gravy in the world..

I'm still afraid to try again.... I don't wanta destroy the world..
You added way too much flour (you know that now) and you didn't cook your flour. For a cream gravy, I start with plenty of fat, cooled down just a bit from cooking the meat, SPRINKLE about a tablespoon of flour across the bottom of the pan, and stir with a fork until incorporated with the fat. Then SLOWLY add the milk, stirring constantly with the fork and allowing the mixture to cook. It will thicken as you go and you can add flour in small increments or more liquid until you like the consistency - remember it will thicken more when you take it off the heat. For a brown gravy, I let the flour cook until brown (duh!) before adding water or broth.
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Old 09-24-2013, 09:20 PM
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We use and store UHT shelf stable milk. It lasts about 3 months out of date. Great for anything where cooked milk is used. Cold, it has a scalded taste. Gravies, pancakes, boiled custard, pudding, flan in Bisquik, taters- mashed, taters- scalloped, mac & cheese, potato soup, etc. I never could get over powdered milk taste.

Potato soup made with old potatoes, salt pork & onions on a cold day with corn bread made from UHT milk. YUM!
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