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Old 08-28-2013, 04:40 PM
technojunkie technojunkie is offline
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If you've got the money for an AA, then get one. Your only dilemma at this point should be size. I bought a cheap presto canner a couple years ago and have no issues with it, but will be buying an AA soon for all the reasons already stated. (the presto is slow to cool, has wearign parts etc...)
Old 08-28-2013, 04:56 PM
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When I first started I researched this I concluded that the All-American, because it didn't require a gasket, was the most SHTF-robust there is.

And it is. I thought about buying extra gaskets for a Presto, wasn't sure how well they would last over time. Perhaps someone has more experience with that.

However, this is one of those things--like with the Country Living Grain Mill--where you have to ask whether you're better off buying a couple Wondermill Jrs and having change left, or buying a tank like the CLGM.

Same deal--All American, or a couple of Prestos with an extra gasket or two? If the gaskets can last years and extra ones won't degrade, then the Prestos are a more cost-effective solution (plus you can run two at a time).

At least there's a choice.
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Old 08-28-2013, 05:14 PM
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I'll chime in with everyone else about the All American canner. Early this spring I also purchased the AA that does 14 quarts at one time. Really cut down my time spent pressure canning.

Have used it three times so far and the lids is still difficult to remove, but I suspect it will seat in the near future. Love it!

Sure beats the gasket Presto model I was using. I think I spent about $300.00 for mine from amazon.com. and American made.

I can't say anything bad about my seven quart Presto pressure canner. I've had it for a long time, have a spare gasket for it but has never needed changed.

I do have another regular Presto pressure "cooker" I've had for years and have had to replace the gasket a couple of times. I think pressure cooking food shortens the life span of the gasket.

It's nice having the big jobber when the tomato's and green beans come in, and convenient to have the small Presto for smaller jobs. Best of both worlds!
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Old 08-28-2013, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Dennis1209 View Post
Have used it three times so far and the lids is still difficult to remove, but I suspect it will seat in the near future. Love it!
It does get easier, I just put a little olive oil on my finger and go over the edge where it seals every day I use it. It's a wider area than you would think, it's the beveled edge. If I'm doing three batches in one day I do it at the beginning, not each time.
Old 08-23-2014, 02:59 AM
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I'm going to be the outlier and suggest the 941. I have the 930 because that seemed like the sweet spot for output vs dollars, but I was wrong. 32 pints in a 941 is better than 14 quarts in the 930 due to a shorter processing time and less loss of texture in your final product, not to mention it's easier to size your portions when using pints vs quarts.

I'm going to suck it up some time in the next few years and invest in a 941 to go with my 930, and triple my throughput of meals in the same amount of time.
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Old 08-23-2014, 04:16 AM
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If you are on a tight budget a Presto 23 quart is a good reliable pressure cooker.
I have owned several.

That being said, if you want one that will outlast you, your children & theirs.
Absolutely go with an AA, the bigger the better & I would suggest a 925 as a small one & a 941 as a BIG one.

https://fantes.com/manuals/all-ameri...ker-manual.pdf

They are a work horse & so long as you treat them right, they literally will last forever.

Below are a few pictures of AA’s I have owned & several I still do.


AA 925


AA 941, 921 & 910


AA 941

All of mine are equipped with the Sterilizer valves



They don’t release steam, unless you over pressure them to around 21 pounds.

Then, they whistle like a like a steam engine.
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Old 08-23-2014, 04:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis1209 View Post

Have used it three times so far and the lids is still difficult to remove, but I suspect it will seat in the near future. Love it!

!
Brand new the AA lids do tend to stick a few times.

Always line up the notches or arrows & put the lid on the same way every time.

Tighten 12 o'clock down snug, them 6 o'clock snug, then 9 o'clock snug, then 3 o'clock down snug.

That settles the lid on evenly, then tighten the remainder clockwise or counter clock wise however you like.

If it still doesn't seat well, as suggested use a little olive oil around the inner rim when you start.

If that doesn't help, use some very very fine grit emery paper & lightly rub the inner downslope of the pot rim to smooth out any tiny spot that might be causing it to bind, then apply olive oil & go again.
Old 08-23-2014, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by goose3 View Post
I thought about buying extra gaskets for a Presto, wasn't sure how well they would last over time. Perhaps someone has more experience with that.
I have a Presto 6 qt. stainless steel pressure cooker that was purchased in 1977-8?
At first the gaskets did deteriorate (absorbed oil and stretched out of shape). But they changed the composition, and I haven't changed a gasket in 18 years or so.
Can't say anything bad about Presto pressure cookers (st. st.).
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:38 AM
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I have a Presto, and I am happy with it. I think I paid $60 at Walmart for it 6 years ago. I have done probably close to 2000 jars with it. I have replaced the gasket once.

Mine will hold 7 quarts, 10-11 pints (Depending on the brand of jars), and I think 13 or 14 1/2 pints. I don't often do 1/2 pints.

At one time I would have loved to have gotten a larger All American canner, one that could do double the amount. But I honestly don't think I'd use all the extra space.

I did tomatoes last night, for example. I got 4 1/2 quarts of tomato broth and 3 quarts of sauce. And that's generally about what I get in a full batch, which just fills up my canner (and the 1/2 quart went in the fridge).

When canning goes full blast, and I have bushels of apples, or grapes, or green beans coming out of my ears, or tomatoes piling up... just enough jars to fill up the canner is mostly all I can do at a time. I do green beans in pints, and while I have one load starting, the time it takes for that to be done is just enough time for me to get the next batch ready to go.
Old 08-23-2014, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by peak_oil View Post
I'm going to be the outlier and suggest the 941. I have the 930 because that seemed like the sweet spot for output vs dollars, but I was wrong. 32 pints in a 941 is better than 14 quarts in the 930 due to a shorter processing time and less loss of texture in your final product, not to mention it's easier to size your portions when using pints vs quarts.
Unless you have several people working dealing with processing and filling all those jars is going to be a hassle. Since we are relatively a small family, I'm actually keeping my eyes open for a second AA at a yard sale. I really want something smaller so I could actually fill it and use it in an evening. I find that the dealing with the 930 is best left to weekends. I'd even get another 930 because then I would be able to stagger loads. Working on the second while the first one is processing.
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Old 08-23-2014, 08:40 AM
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Brand new the AA lids do tend to stick a few times.
I remember the first time and it happened. I asked my husband if he could loosen it. He couldn't and then started trying to figure out how to get it off. I said STOP read the directions. He said they don't have directions on how to unstick the lid, I'll go on the web. I told him yes they do because it sometimes happens in the beginning.

He thought it was an impressive piece of equipment, that just reinforced his feeling.
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Old 08-23-2014, 08:48 AM
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I made the same choice you're looking at, with this exception: I bought the 921. A little more capacity, which if you're serious about switching away from commercially-canned food, I think you're going to want. So if I were you, I'd look at the larger capacity.

We have one of those stoves w/ the glass top and the elements underneath; supposedly that's a problem w/ heavy canners on them, but I didn't have any problem, and called the company and they said it was OK. That was the 921. But as always, YMMV.

The biggest reason I made this choice was the same as you noted: no gasket.

Now, having said that, for those who don't have $200-250 lying around for a no-gasket pressure canner, the Presto, I think, is fine--and you can buy extra gaskets for them and they don't cost all that much. I've talked/communicated w/ people who have them and the gaskets appear pretty robust, lasting years and years.

I've considered buying a Presto as a backup to my All-American, and buying a couple extra gaskets at the same time. Might allow me greater throughput when canning (while I'm waiting for the All-American to cool down, I could start the Presto), and, well, in the dictionary next to the words "redundancy," "backups," "spare parts," and "fail-safe" is my picture.

And FWIW: The reason the 921 doesn't need a gasket is the perfect fit between pot and lid. It's why I bought it to begin with--no gasket--but I can also envision a scenario where I or someone drops the lid or drops something onto the pot rim, and dents or scratches or otherwise compromises the surfaces that must mate exactly for pressure to build. And then what? I've never heard of that happening, but as I said, my logon name shouldn't be Goose3, it should be Mr.Redundancy. I plan for contingencies and capabilities.

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Old 08-23-2014, 08:54 AM
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My wife and I are in the market for a pressure canner. What do you think are some of the better ones on the market?

We have decided to get away from factory made canned foods and start canning our own. By next spring we would like to have everything ready to go to grow and can our own foods.

The one I am looking at is an All American 15 1/2 quart, which cost $174.99 from amazon and holds 10 pint jars or 7 quart jars.

One of the things I like about the All American is that it does not require a gasket. If I can eliminate parts that can wear out, the better off we will be in the long run.

I would like to can beans, peas, okra, corn, chicken meat, maybe some pork, squash, and other veggies we can grow in the garden.

So Kev, you started this thread a year ago....what did you decide to get?
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Old 08-23-2014, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by goose3 View Post
I made the same choice you're looking at, with this exception: I bought the 921. A little more capacity, which if you're serious about switching away from commercially-canned food, I think you're going to want. So if I were you, I'd look at the larger capacity.
This is the one I'm look for as my second AA, when I was trying to decide what I wanted (it was a gift) I really looked long and hard between the 921 and the 930. The number of pint jars is the same, but you could do two levels of quarts. I really, really wanted that.

What decided me was the number of people who said they started with the 921 and it was just too small and they were hoping to get the 930. I also have seen the 921 on Craig's list but not the 930.
Old 08-23-2014, 11:01 AM
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I have a 921 but it only has a pressure guage and a sterilizer valve. No other holes except for the safety plug. Does anybody know if you can replace the valve with a jiggler weight ? I have canned thousands of jars with mine but you have to pay attention to the gauge constantly.
Old 08-23-2014, 01:48 PM
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I have a 921 but it only has a pressure guage and a sterilizer valve. No other holes except for the safety plug. Does anybody know if you can replace the valve with a jiggler weight ? I have canned thousands of jars with mine but you have to pay attention to the gauge constantly.
Probably the reason you have to monitor your AA so much is the electric stove rheostat or element is haywire. If the dial or element causes heat fluctuation, the AA will fluctuate accordingly. So the stove is probably the issue, not the AA.

GAS stoves or burners are better than electric stoves for pressure cooking/canning/sterilization, as once set, the heat fluctuation is so minimal, it usually matters not.

I have run two AA 941’s side by side on a dual gas burner on the patio outside every day for 3 or 4 days in a row during daylight hours. Only stopping to cool down, unload, reload, reheat & continue without any heat fluctuation issues.

I prefer the “sterilizer” valves or a weight valve. Sterilizer valves don’t release (lose) steam or pressure, unless the AA is overheated. Usually around 18 to 21 PSI, they will start to whistle releasing steam to warn you the AA is overheating.

Yes, you can change over to a weight valve. Order a nipple & weight. Unscrew the sterilizer valve, screw in the nipple the weight rides on & you are good to go. I doubt you will like the change, as a sterilizer valve is an upgrade.

The only reason they changed to weights, is they are less expensive than the sterilizer valve.
Old 08-23-2014, 07:57 PM
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I love my AA 915 - it's the one that lives in the kitchen, and it's a rare week that it doesn't come out at least once. I'm under 5' so even the 921 is too tall for me to safely lift the hot jars out if I'm using it on the stove; if on a turkey fryer, it's not so much of a problem.

I also have a couple of Mirro canners, and 4 or 5 Presto canners at last count - including a giant one that I can double stack quarts in. I'd rather run 2 canners than wait on that monster to come up to steam! I buy canners at auction and rehab them; then pass them down to family members - after checking them out, of course. www.pressurecooker-canner.com and www.pressurecooker-outlet.com are both good places to buy replacement parts.

I would encourage any Presto canner users to purchase part #50332 - this is a 3 piece adjustable weight (5#, 10#, 15#) that replaces the one piece weight that comes with the Presto canners and makes it much easier to keep the pressure at 10# without having to frequently adjust the heat on the stove. Fluctuations in temperature can cause the jars to siphon out liquid, so you end up with a much nicer looking product as well.
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Old 08-24-2014, 08:02 PM
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Thanks for the great advice, I hope to get an AA 921 ordered this week!
Old 08-25-2014, 11:14 AM
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I have run two AA 941ís side by side on a dual gas burner on the patio outside every day for 3 or 4 days in a row during daylight hours. Only stopping to cool down, unload, reload, reheat & continue without any heat fluctuation issues.
What amount of fuel did that use?
Old 08-25-2014, 11:36 AM
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All American isn't the only option in Gasketless canners. They are a good product no doubt but there is another option. It requires a bit of thought and some elbow grease. I have three National canners, these are the ORIGINAL gasketless canners. They are long out of production but that is of little consequence in the grand scheme of things.....

Rather than try to explain it all etc...Here is a video that explains what I did. You can find the Nationals at garage sales, flea markets, craigslist, thrift shops, asking around at Church- the usual suspects. I have less than $150 in ALL THREE of mine, that includes all the new parts etc....And they do everything that the shiny new All Americans do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TCsee6sNPg
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