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Old 06-16-2013, 02:58 PM
MamabearAL MamabearAL is offline
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Default Canning Store bought milk?



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Id like to have a variety of milk products in my storages...Could one pressure can pasturized/homogenized whole milk? At 1.00 per can of condensed milk which is 8oz, it can get expensive...at 2.50 a Gallon for store bought milk and being familiar with pressure canning, could this not be done??? A few home comforts in my stores would be great, and some milk to go with cookies would be the perfect ending to a day of beans and rice IMO.
Old 06-16-2013, 04:24 PM
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No canning any dairy. How about powderedmilk?
Old 06-16-2013, 04:32 PM
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It doesn't work, sadly. Augason Farms has a product called Morning Moos that I have read tastes very similar to real milk. I've been stocking it, but it's too darn expensive to try out.
Old 06-16-2013, 05:16 PM
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I don't think butter or milk is a home canning option. Factory powdered milk in a can should keep well.
Old 06-16-2013, 05:23 PM
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Rather than condensed milk in cans, have you tried the UHT milk that is ultra pasteurized in the TetraPack containers? They usually have a shelf life of a few years. Still more expensive than regular milk, I've seen them usually for around $2 for a quart size container, rotating some through your regular stores would eat least give you a few years worth to have around. Beyond that, get a cow? If you're in the city and have some backyard space, you could try "pet" goats.
Old 06-16-2013, 05:48 PM
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Also you could try Nido, which is powdered whole milk. Walmart sells this usually in the ethnic foods aisle near Mexican products. It is delicious for baking or drinking uses -- we usually drink 2% and when I rotate this into drinking milk, my husband complains that it is too thick and creamy -- which makes me laugh!!
Old 06-17-2013, 02:49 PM
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I'm gonna try Nido. I LOVE powdered milk for cooking and storage properties, but hate drinking powdered skim milk. Even the kids will forgo Lucky Charms rather than drink powdered skim (though they love it in potato soup, chowder, anything mixed up and cooked).

I have not tried canning milk. Evangelista sez it can be done; I have not often been disappointed with her advice but I do note that it IS worth fact-checking her. I think it would work-- so far so good with home canning anything that I can get canned in the store.

Much like canned condensed, though, I doubt the finished product tastes a whole lot like milk. I'll bet that, best-case scenario, the lactose carmelizes in the canning process. What you have, then, is a thin, sweet, caramel-y stuff in a jar that would make a good pudding-- or maybe even a stand-alone dessert with fruit-- but isn't really exactly milk any more.

Guess it couldn't hurt to toss a pint of milk in the canner the next time you're doing a batch of meat and see what you get-- or even go so far as to divide a gallon into half-pints and run that as a batch one drunk night. Let's say you're paying an absolute premium for milk-- $5 a gallon. If it turns out to be nothing but a trip to the school of hard knocks, that's cheap enough tuition.

Well-- I should speak for myself. Tell you ladies what-- it's summer. There's bound to be another night soon that the kids stay up for hours after Hubby goes to bed. One of those nights, I will can up a gallon of milk and tell you how it goes.

Sound like fun??? Who's going to keep Crazy MC company while she runs this pressure-vessel experiment??? C'mon, girls....
Old 06-17-2013, 02:55 PM
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@MC -- honestly I wouldn't waste the time or resources to try this. I am a big chicken when it comes to deviating from the modern safe canning methods. And dairy is a big safety no-no when it comes to home canning.

Even varying things like the size of the cubed food can cause unsafe results, according to the Kerr / Ball canning hotline. So I wouldn't try it with a big variable like a dairy food, especially when there are ready alternatives available.

Also, Nido stores a lot longer than I thought it would -- I have often used cans that were 1-2 years past their expiration date with no issue. I store these in my basement, in a cool and dry but not "cold" environment.
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Old 06-18-2013, 01:20 AM
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My latest copy of Country Living had an article on canning butter. Seems pretty easy. Sorry I don't have the magazine with me now.
Old 06-18-2013, 01:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC Ain't Crazy View Post
I'm gonna try Nido. I LOVE powdered milk for cooking and storage properties, but hate drinking powdered skim milk. Even the kids will forgo Lucky Charms rather than drink powdered skim (though they love it in potato soup, chowder, anything mixed up and cooked).
I had that problem too, but mix it thicker and add a teaspoon of vanilla. They actually like it now with cereal. Still have to buy regular milk for drinking straight though.
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Old 06-18-2013, 02:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Brocker91 View Post
My latest copy of Country Living had an article on canning butter. Seems pretty easy. Sorry I don't have the magazine with me now.
I'm not sure if you guys have tried the Fagor canning kit. Maybe this will save you guys some trouble.
Old 06-18-2013, 02:15 AM
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Evidently the trick is that you have to use extremely fresh-- as in not gonna get it that fresh at the grocery store-- milk.

Maybe the girls up at the dairy could help me out. Even at $5 a gallon-- cheap tuition.

No worries about it poisoning you, though-- AFAIK, if it fails, take one look at the crap in the jar, you won't want to drink it.

Or wash the jar, for that matter. Yukkkk.

I've got a Ball/Kerr book. And the USDA Center for Home Food Preservation bookmarked (and printed out and tucked in a binder in my kitchen).

They also say never to can fruits or veggies that are damaged in any way.

I've put up and eaten over 1,000 pints of damaged tomatoes, older green beans, moldy peaches (with the mold trimmed off, of course). Diced squash-- works great; it's puree that might not heat uniformly even in a pressure canner (though I've eaten that too-- made a darn good squash soup). All my preserves are made from stuff that was not exactly appetizing. I serve the perfect produce fresh and can the unappealing stuff.

Until I get my garden up to full operating capacity and my berries come into production, I buy damaged produce for canning. By the bushel. I just spent $12 putting up 10 pints of preserves from strawberries that got messed over by the hail last weekend. The guy had two gallons left when I got to the farm stan; I grinned from ear to ear and jumped on those suckers. My kids and I ate the ones that were still OK looking while we cut and mashed the gross ones for preserves.

I left him my number and a request to call if he has any more. My kids eat a LOT of preserves.

OK, preserves are easy; all that sugar would probably preserve a mummy. But...

I've done a lot of stuff the USDA says can't be done. My aunt, too. Don't get my grandmothers started-- mention "canning" and you're in for a thirty-minute story about how they used to can green beans by the washtub load.

The washtub wasn't what they used to carry the beans in from the garden. It was what they used for a boiling bath. They set it on a frame over a fire, conscripted their younger siblings to carry firewood, and boiled the beans in the jars for four and a half hours.

While I imagine four and a half hours in a boiling bath did a real number on the vitamin content...

Everybody lived. Everybody in town did it. Neither of my grandmothers ever even heard of anyone getting botulism (though I figure it's either salmonella or ptomaine that you want to watch for with milk-- listeria too, but you can get that from fresh milk if conditions in the dairy were dirty), until they read about the possibility as a reason they should stop canning and buy their green beans at the store instead.
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