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Old 05-01-2013, 04:50 PM
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northernguy northernguy is offline
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Originally Posted by cffwy View Post
That's really cool - do you go past Takla or out the Cassiar way? Either way, good idea. I am in southern AB, but used to spend time around your parts (`had an old 180 on floats for a few years), and I always wanted to try what you guys are doing. Good on ya.
Yep...past Takla. The airstrip we use just up from Bear Lake (the top end of the Driftwood Valley). Nice country. They might be taking the tracks out though...

The 180 is great plane (I have about 3000 in them). We use my buddy's 170 and I recently bought a Pacer that's set up for backcountry flying...we couldn't get all the beer in the 170 so I had to buy the Pacer to pick up the slack!

Last edited by northernguy; 05-01-2013 at 04:53 PM.. Reason: Update
Old 05-01-2013, 04:55 PM
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For versatility to drive the tracks and leave them to continue your exit route, look at a Baja style pre-runner vehicle with coilover suspension set-up to absorb and soak-up the rough gravel terrain of a railway track. A fast ride over harsh terrain costs real $$, do-able but is expensive.
Old 05-01-2013, 05:10 PM
CAPTAMERICA77 CAPTAMERICA77 is offline
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Most railroad tracks have a access road that runs along side them. might be a good option to drive along side the tracks when you can. Then use the tracks when you have to. most have a access ramp every so often to drive over or onto the tracks. If not you can make a small ramp that could be used and taken along?
Old 05-01-2013, 05:19 PM
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If you just have a short distance to go the tracks are an option but any distance and you better have lots of spare tires. The rough ride and the track rubbing on the side walls your tires are not going to last long.
And just because the shtf does not mean trains will not run and think every time you go over bridge or trestle and you meet a train coming you have no where to go even if you see it coming .
Old 05-01-2013, 06:16 PM
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If you've ever walked RR lines you hate them after a mile or so. The ties are spaced wrong, and too narrow to get your whole foot on it.

Capt. America has it right. Maintenance access used to be by motorcars that ran on the rails, but now they use regular trucks and have trails that run parallel to the track. That would be the way to travel rail lines, and the place to walk or ride a bike.
Old 05-06-2013, 09:58 AM
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I saw this during one of my random trails through YouTube and thought of this thread. The device looks very simple, but seems to be able to carry a sizable load.

This is What Happens When Two Bamboo Trains Meet on the Bamboo Railway.

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Old 05-06-2013, 11:32 AM
Canadian Prepster Canadian Prepster is offline
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Though hardly the answer to all of our problems, railways do provide several opportunities for outdoorsmen and survivalists.

In the area north of my hometown that I'm most familiar with, railways have provided access to thousands (if not tens of thousands) of acres of Crown Land, including several lakes with no road access or cottages on them. One of the lakes that I fished with my brother years ago was full of bass that while a bit smaller than what most sport fishermen would pursue, would certainly be able to consistently provide a source of food if needed. With a retrieving dog and/or one or two prepositioned boats or canoes, it would not be too difficult to harvest ducks in season, perhaps even limit out on occasion with just a little bit of pre-season scouting and prep. There's also lots of turkeys in the woods and I've known of hunters using the tracks to get large deer out to the roads (we don't have alot, but one buck shot by a relative of mine many years ago topped 300 pounds). As for speed of travel on foot, I think it depends somewhat on the length of one's legs and pacing oneself to the railway ties. I did about ten miles along a stretch of track with a friend last fall and it wasn't too difficult at all, even in the dark.

For bugging out or as an alternate means of travel along parts of a route, I think that railways may have a place, though I only know of people that have made small platforms for pulling out deer or in one case, to carry a canoe to the many backwoods ponds in our area to hunt ducks. A device to ride the tracks could be handy in areas I know of, so long as it's easy enough to remove when trains approach (which can go pretty fast, at least for the passenger trains).

As for the concern about ambushes, highwaymen, etc., anyone around here with one or a number of pre-planned bug out routes from a city will be far ahead of 99% of the population, so worrying about being attacked by criminals hoping to take advantage of the handful of potentially armed preppers that might take a back route to flee the city seems misplaced. Incidentally, since most of the railways I speak of pass through secluded areas where it's perfectly legal and not all that unnormal to carry a gun, that would negate most of the worries about having to "play the grey man" or keep any firearms hidden. There might even be the option of harvesting incidental game that are likely to cross one's path when spending that much time in the bush, even if or when one hasn't the time to actively pursue them. A handy fishing kit, perhaps combined with pit stops or overnight camping along river and lake crossings might also fetch a few fresh fish for the table.

I would think it worth becoming familiar with any railway tracks one might want to use in the event of an emergency, since some of the bridges that cross deep valleys or rivers would be downright frightful to cross (without even worrying about an oncoming train) and it would be wise to at least familiarize oneself with any chokepoints along any evacuation route, good resting spots, etc. Similarly, many of the opportunities for fish or game vary widely with the seasons and it would be worth garnering some knowledge about such possibilities.

In summary, I think that railways can provide lots of added value for preppers in a variety of situations, but requires knowledge of local routes and understandings of their limitations.
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Old 05-07-2013, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northernguy View Post
My Buddy and I built a rail speeder to run on an abandoned track in Northern BC. The track goes to some great fishing holes. The speeder is designed to be broken down an put into the back of his plane (There's a remote airstirp along the rail line that we fly in to too start our trip).

We built the speeder from the frame of an old exercise tredmill, machined our own wheels and use a small gas engine to propell it. It has an triangular outrigger that reaches across the rails with a wheel mounted to it. A sheet of plywood covers the rig and we can carry all our camping gear, fishing gear, and two guys at about 15 mph...not fast, but steady (and climbs grades)and we don't have to hike!

Check out the old national film board movie about a guy that crosses Canada on a rail speeder...whimsical fiction but worth watching.
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Originally Posted by northernguy View Post
Yep...past Takla. The airstrip we use just up from Bear Lake (the top end of the Driftwood Valley). Nice country. They might be taking the tracks out though...

The 180 is great plane (I have about 3000 in them). We use my buddy's 170 and I recently bought a Pacer that's set up for backcountry flying...we couldn't get all the beer in the 170 so I had to buy the Pacer to pick up the slack!
That *is* nice country. `Good place to get good and lost, too, if things ever do go to $hit. If they take the track out, it'll be easier to use ATVs, so that's a minus or a plus. I still get out to a cabin just north of Takla Landing every year or two. You're living the dream, friend; most days I'm still stuck in a city of a million plus...
Old 05-11-2013, 09:55 AM
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Has anyone here heard of RAILBIKES?


There are actually a fair number of websites discussing the building and running of these bikes, as well as the various forms they can take. Quite interesting and they don't look all that difficult to build.

Another thought on "riding the rails", people have been indoctrinated that only trains run on railroad tracks. Anyone that has walked on or around them and anyone that has tried to motorcycle down one remembers the very unpleasant time they spent doing it. So.....railroads as a means of transportation is not something the average person is going to think of. They will be BLIND to the possibilities of their value and use.

To that extent I wouldn't really be as worried about running into bad types on them, at least not in the initial period of a collapse. It these bikes start catching on as a means of easy transportation then maybe, however we've had the idea of roads as primary transportation methods so ground into our way of thinking about moving about I think it will be some time before the average Joe gives it any thought at all.
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Old 05-12-2013, 02:19 AM
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Very good idea. You wont need to drive on the tracks much as there are access roads that parallel most tracks. Or you can go all the way and get one of these fitted to your BOV.





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Old 05-12-2013, 04:34 AM
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That is a hilarious way to spend some disposable income lol.
Old 05-15-2013, 12:08 AM
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If folks start driving on the tracks it's going to make a long day for me. Don't do it! Walk or ride a bike along them and be watchful. Trains can sneak upon you fast.
Old 05-15-2013, 12:12 AM
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You can buy used Hi-Rail trucks and you can purchase Hi-Rail systems for your personal vehicle.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRASHCAN_ZOMBIE View Post
If folks start driving on the tracks it's going to make a long day for me. Don't do it! Walk or ride a bike along them and be watchful. Trains can sneak upon you fast.
Good prepper should be able to do it, I could. Most traffic uses truncated radio; if your a determined survivalist listening to traffic is no probs. Also doesn't modern traffic broadcast a tone on UHF for the automated collision avoidance system?

Quote:
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You can buy used Hi-Rail trucks and you can purchase Hi-Rail systems for your personal vehicle.
Hows That! Hi-Rail has an operation down unda.
love your work cheney
Old 05-21-2013, 07:48 PM
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I don't really know the scientific terms for our system, but the dispatcher will control which track he wants you to run on and you follow the signals. The methods of operation vary by each railroad. Some still operate on 100% paper no fancy stuff. So if you get near the tracks watch out. Don't walk through tunnels on active tracks either. That's a for sure way to get killed.
Old 05-21-2013, 07:53 PM
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fast way to die.
Old 05-26-2013, 01:54 AM
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We have had several discussions about BO via following rails in the past, both on this forum and on others.

To the people making negative post in this thread, I would remind you that this activity isn't for now, its for SHTF/TEOTWAWKI/WROL (without rule of law). During a time you might need to use this, there is a strong possibility that trains might not even be running due to EMP, etc.

I wish I had more to add to this personally, but I don't.

I do have these URL's that I have archived from previous discussions that I hope will be helpful to all.

http://www.survivalblog.com/2011/01/...outes_for.html

http://www.deskmap.com/railroad.html

http://www.abandonedrails.com/
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Old 05-29-2013, 12:21 AM
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man, I hope my post didn't kill this thread!

I am curious for anyone who is planning to utilize the rails as part of a bug out plan, have you done any testing of your plan?

Have you walked (or what ever) along side of the rails to do a fair weather test? I am kind of curious as to what additional concerns or other discoveries you may have uncovered?
Old 05-29-2013, 12:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IronBeard View Post
Has anyone here heard of RAILBIKES?


There are actually a fair number of websites discussing the building and running of these bikes, as well as the various forms they can take. Quite interesting and they don't look all that difficult to build.

Another thought on "riding the rails", people have been indoctrinated that only trains run on railroad tracks. Anyone that has walked on or around them and anyone that has tried to motorcycle down one remembers the very unpleasant time they spent doing it. So.....railroads as a means of transportation is not something the average person is going to think of. They will be BLIND to the possibilities of their value and use.

To that extent I wouldn't really be as worried about running into bad types on them, at least not in the initial period of a collapse. It these bikes start catching on as a means of easy transportation then maybe, however we've had the idea of roads as primary transportation methods so ground into our way of thinking about moving about I think it will be some time before the average Joe gives it any thought at all.
This is some food for thought to converting a Mtb for use on the rails! Hmm.... I may have to do some research? Which brings up bike trails as a way to get out of a area quick, since they usually aren't wide enough for vehicles!
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Old 05-29-2013, 02:28 AM
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anyone got a link to a railbike site?
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