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Old 02-18-2013, 03:54 PM
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Default Soup Mix Shelf Life



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First off, let me apologize for such a dumb question. I tried the search function and found this video but no info on it really. The lady in the video making the soup said it would last about a year in the pantry and even longer if you left the bacon out. My question is, how much longer. What if I put this in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers....how much longer then? I realize that this soup is mostly carbs with little protein, but darn it, I like potato soup!

Also, I've seen some threads with homemade soup mixes and mylar pouch mixes. If you know the link to those, let me know! TIA!!

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Old 02-18-2013, 10:20 PM
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No, you probably couldn't store this exact recipe for much longer than a year or two. What is holding it back from lasting longer is the cheese and sour cream. Both of these ingredients naturally have fat in them (so does the powdered butter I think), and that will go rancid even when using oxygen absorbers. If you left out the items with fat in them, you could easily go ten years. Some people are storing real cheese, not the powdered kind, by dipping chunks of it into paraffin wax repeatedly to build an airtight layer around it. I'm not sure how long you could store it this way, so you might want to check that out. As for the butter, you can easily purchase canned butter (Wijsman is a popular one) that will last for a minimum of ten years, and yes, it's real butter, not the powdered stuff.
Old 02-18-2013, 10:24 PM
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Got some stuff at Kroger the other day. Bear Creek or Bear Mountain I believe, and TARA it was potato soup - darn good as a matter of fact. I added some dried onions to it and it was GREAT.

This stuff was in a sealed package, and all that was needed was water, and to cook I believe 20 mins. Shelf life was several years, and I would guess you could almost double that in a decent environment. Made enough soup for about seven or eight people too.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:54 PM
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Make your own potato soup from stored ingredients. Potato flakes, powdered milk, chicken bullion, spices you prefer, and something to add richness like powdered butter or powdered cheese.

It seems to me that far too many food preppers keep wanting long term shelf life from premixed foods. Just like everyone wanting to get Bisquick to last for years when the baking powder simply will not last that long. But everything needed for Bisquick type products can be made from separate ingredients that are shelf stable for ages if kept apart and seal right.

In the case of powdered soup the poster above makes it plain that the fatty powders will go rancid in the mixed bag in just a year or two. Those same fatty powders can be far more shelf stable stored alone the proper way. All you have to is mix the separate ingredients at the time you want to eat it.

I suspect, though I'm not pointing fingers here, that a lot of people want these "complete mixes" because they cannot or do not want to cook from scratch. Cooking being a household skill being in great decline in my lifetime due to a variety of changing social factors. But true cooking (not simply rehydrating and/or heating) is a valuable survival skill everyone should learn. It's a skill that pays off long before you need it for survival. It begins to pay off almost immediately in your food bills and healthier diet. If you truly know how to cook from scratch with discrete components then you will be far more able to eat better both now and during any survival situation. Yeah, the first few months are rough as you stumble your way through the basics and have to eat some bad experiments, but it levels out pretty quick. If you get serious about proper cooking now you will be amazing yourself a year from now in taste, health, and income savings.

Plus the fundamentals of basic cooking come in handy later when you get to advanced skills like home canning and drying/smoking foods. Learn a bit of gardening on top of your proper cooking skills and you fully close the loop on self sufficiency so you aren't forced to rely on your stored goods forever.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:02 PM
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Got some stuff at Kroger the other day. Bear Creek or Bear Mountain I believe, and TARA it was potato soup - darn good as a matter of fact. I added some dried onions to it and it was GREAT.

This stuff was in a sealed package, and all that was needed was water, and to cook I believe 20 mins. Shelf life was several years, and I would guess you could almost double that in a decent environment. Made enough soup for about seven or eight people too.
I'll tell you something about Bear Creek soups. They are not formulated for long term storage. Back in the 90s, Bear Creek themselves packaged their soups in #10 cans with O2 absorbers. The label stated only a 5 year shelf life. I bought a BUNCH of them. And after 5 years, most of them were seriously showing their age. And Tortilla soup was absolutely inedibly rancid.

Even with such good packaging, the mix just didn't last. And they themselves knew it wouldn't, so they rated it at 5 years. Shame too, because I really like them as a base ingredient for cooking. They don't have much nutrition on their own, but they sure made a good soup base when you add other ingredients to them.

This is actually one of the criteria I use to judge whether a "fly by night" food storage company is legit or not. If they're repackaging Bear Creek soups and trying to tell you it will last 20 years, they are flat out lying!
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:03 PM
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Make your own potato soup from stored ingredients. Potato flakes, powdered milk, chicken bullion, spices you prefer, and something to add richness like powdered butter or powdered cheese.

It seems to me that far too many food preppers keep wanting long term shelf life from premixed foods. Just like everyone wanting to get Bisquick to last for years when the baking powder simply will not last that long. But everything needed for Bisquick type products can be made from separate ingredients that are shelf stable for ages if kept apart and seal right.

In the case of powdered soup the poster above makes it plain that the fatty powders will go rancid in the mixed bag in just a year or two. Those same fatty powders can be far more shelf stable stored alone the proper way. All you have to is mix the separate ingredients at the time you want to eat it.

I suspect, though I'm not pointing fingers here, that a lot of people want these "complete mixes" because they cannot or do not want to cook from scratch. Cooking being a household skill being in great decline in my lifetime due to a variety of changing social factors. But true cooking (not simply rehydrating and/or heating) is a valuable survival skill everyone should learn. It's a skill that pays off long before you need it for survival. It begins to pay off almost immediately in your food bills and healthier diet. If you truly know how to cook from scratch with discrete components then you will be far more able to eat better both now and during any survival situation. Yeah, the first few months are rough as you stumble your way through the basics and have to eat some bad experiments, but it levels out pretty quick. If you get serious about proper cooking now you will be amazing yourself a year from now in taste, health, and income savings.

Plus the fundamentals of basic cooking come in handy later when you get to advanced skills like home canning and drying/smoking foods. Learn a bit of gardening on top of your proper cooking skills and you fully close the loop on self sufficiency so you aren't forced to rely on your stored goods forever.
That's my philosophy right there. I learned from experience that premade foods are just not a great idea for other than short term use. Cooking from scratch is important for many reasons. One of which is storage life.

Cooking is a basic life skill. One that everyone should master anyway, whether they're a survivalist or not. But it's especially critical to survivalists. And it's just not that hard to do. The world is full of amazing cuisines and recipes using the same ingredients that most of us are storing anyway. No sense EVER eating boring food.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:55 PM
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That's my philosophy right there. I learned from experience that premade foods are just not a great idea for other than short term use. Cooking from scratch is important for many reasons. One of which is storage life.
I try to tell people that when they walk into the local supermarket there are only 2 food aisles in the whole store no matter how big it is. The baking and dry goods aisles. The rest is so-called prepared food which I believe is mostly prepared and very little food. I tell everyone the food in a grocery store is on the perimeter wall. Loop around the edge and you get veggies, meats, dairy, and beer......the four basic food groups.

While my advice weakens a little when considering stockpile foods, the philosophy remains the same. Don't look for someone else to mix your foods for you. Learn to cook with individual ingredients and learn to use them in the rawest state you can readily obtain them in.

The best part is the exploring never stops once you learn the fundamentals. Thai, Indian, Mediterranean, Hispanic, Cajun, Southern, etc. Almost all cuisines are based from working with ingredients considered low cost in the regions those cuisines formed. They were the foods of the low class masses making due with limited options and income. So the more cuisines you learn the easier it becomes to make a tasty meal from low cost ingredients.

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Cooking is a basic life skill. One that everyone should master anyway, whether they're a survivalist or not. But it's especially critical to survivalists. And it's just not that hard to do. The world is full of amazing cuisines and recipes using the same ingredients that most of us are storing anyway. No sense EVER eating boring food.
I was born at an age when housewives were just about to quit being commonplace. All my school friends' moms knew how to cook from scratch. Within a decade the traditional housewife became a rarity. By and large women put aside this household chore and men found themselves staring at fast food and microwave dinners. It's no wonder that men have learned to fill the skill gap in the decades since. Men have always been motivated by their stomach.

Learning the cooking skill when I was young wasn't due to a love of the craft. Back then teens could hold a proper job and I got one in a restaurant. But I'm very happy I learned the skill when I did. As a lifelong bachelor I found how easy it was to get a gal to go on a date if I offered to cook. That the date was also conveniently at my home made the night less expensive and far easier to "extend the date".

So I would highly recommend young people of both sexes to learn how to cook early. Besides the health, survival, and income reasons you will also have an instant mate-magnet ability on call. Not all of us can live in palatial penthouses or drive exotic sports cars to entice the opposite sex, but you might be amazed how fruitful the offer to make a fine home cooked meal will be to someone you want to impress.
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Old 02-19-2013, 02:09 PM
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Got some stuff at Kroger the other day. Bear Creek or Bear Mountain I believe, and TARA it was potato soup - darn good as a matter of fact. I added some dried onions to it and it was GREAT.

This stuff was in a sealed package, and all that was needed was water, and to cook I believe 20 mins. Shelf life was several years, and I would guess you could almost double that in a decent environment. Made enough soup for about seven or eight people too.
I like the Bear Creek mixes. I've tried several of them and they are good. I grow my own leeks and add them to the potato soup with some bacon bits. GOOD STUFF! The chili can be real good if you add more spices and stuff to it. I look at these types of packs as a good starting point for making a dinner. It can be the base and you start adding to it to meet your needs and tastes.

They may not be ideal for long term storage but if it can get you a couple years, that's okay in my book. Anything that can get you over the hump, especially during the winter months until your garden is producing again is a plus.
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Old 02-19-2013, 02:18 PM
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I bought RainyDay dry soup mix-potato in 2007 and am just now using a can we opened in Dec. The stuff is fine. Is in a #10 can.
Old 02-19-2013, 11:06 PM
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I like the Bear Creek mixes. I've tried several of them and they are good. I grow my own leeks and add them to the potato soup with some bacon bits. GOOD STUFF! The chili can be real good if you add more spices and stuff to it. I look at these types of packs as a good starting point for making a dinner. It can be the base and you start adding to it to meet your needs and tastes.

They may not be ideal for long term storage but if it can get you a couple years, that's okay in my book. Anything that can get you over the hump, especially during the winter months until your garden is producing again is a plus.
Agree - I am a pretty darn good cook according to most, and as a part-time gig have sold foods to food establishments in the area. Yes, I can make some good soups etc using ingredients from the grocery store outer walls , but I thought that particular soup was pretty tasty for when one does not have time to make soup from scratch. Get in from work, want something fast, it's not bad. I did add a bunch of dried onions.

As Mike said, I sure wouldnt go long term with it, but the expiration was like two years so you would probably be good to go a little longer. Five or six years plus - not me, but in the meantime, not to bad, though not homemade.
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:47 AM
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For those of you "holier than thou" scratch cooking is the only way to go types, let me be clear. NOT EVERYONE who wants to make their own "prepackaged" meals does it because they don't want to be bothered! Some of us have busy lives, work full time, take care of the family, etc., and just want something HOMEMADE that will come together quickly. If I put all the ingredients together myself at home, isn't that cooking form scratch? The fact that they're combined in a jar or bag before I cook them can't take away from the fact that I made it myself! Dehydrated or freeze dried ingredients are touted around here from one end to the other, so what's the problem with putting them all together in premeasured amounts and storing them for quick use later on? Please explain all the put-downs.
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:54 AM
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For the OP, let me direct you to cheftessthebakeresse.com. She has a ton of dry mix recipes that have a 5-7 year shelf life, everything from breakfast to dessert. I find the ones that we like to cook up fairly quickly (takes a bit longer here due to the altitude) when I get home from work. The best part is, I know exactly what went into my food and can season, etc., for my family's tastes. And, contrary to some comments you may read here, it IS scratch cooking!
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:26 AM
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I've never considered soup mixes. If there's one thing anyone can cook from scratch, it's soup. So much cheaper that way to. I am a bit concerned with the shelf life of most bullion. Have not been able to find much info on that. I know it contains fats, but stored with O2 absorbers in 40-50 degree climate, I would think it could last quite awhile. I hope so, or I'm gonna be eating a ton of soup over the next year.
Old 02-20-2013, 01:48 AM
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For those of you "holier than thou" scratch cooking is the only way to go types, let me be clear. NOT EVERYONE who wants to make their own "prepackaged" meals does it because they don't want to be bothered! Some of us have busy lives, work full time, take care of the family, etc., and just want something HOMEMADE that will come together quickly. If I put all the ingredients together myself at home, isn't that cooking form scratch? The fact that they're combined in a jar or bag before I cook them can't take away from the fact that I made it myself! Dehydrated or freeze dried ingredients are touted around here from one end to the other, so what's the problem with putting them all together in premeasured amounts and storing them for quick use later on? Please explain all the put-downs.
Yes, I would say that if you take individual ingredients you have prepped, mix them together dry, and cook them later then you are basically cooking from scratch.

My major point earlier was that many simply do not know how to do even that which you do. They buy premixed from the stores and call it cooking. I believe my line above was about those who simply add water and heat to store prepared foods and call it cooking. You clearly would be doing more than that. You just cooked it in 2 distinct parts, the early prep and combining followed by the rehydrating and heating later.

One could call what you do akin to someone who fully cooked a big meal on Sunday and reheated the meals throughout the week to save time. You might just be heating it later but you did properly cook the meal at one point.

One thing of note, however, is to remember that when you make your own mixes for storage you will run into the same time issues that normal packaged foods do. You won't get the same shelf life like you will with discrete components each stored alone the best way possible for that food.

As long as you keep that in mind and don't assume it will last like single ingredients then I don't see any problem. Keep LTS foods whole/separate and consider your homemade dry mixes to be mid term storage foods good for up to a couple years.

My biggest point earlier was for people to learn how to actually cook from scratch and not rely heavily on retail prepped foods that fill most of the grocery aisles. I consider folks who open a can or pouch, that they didn't make themselves, doing anything more than heating. If disaster happens those premade meals will eventually go away and everyone will have to be working with raw foods to feed themselves. To the uninitiated that can be harder than they think, especially when they don't have modern society to help them past the learning phase. Better to learn that skill now while they can.

In short, my comments above don't apply to you, imo. They were directed at those couldn't make a dry mix from scratch ahead of time.

Btw, nice link for dry mixes you gave.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:15 AM
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Get a dehydrator and make you own soup mixes. You can then control everything that goes in, how it is flavored, how much salt is in it, everything.

I make my own soup bases and store them. I will add dehydrated as well as fresh ingredients to them to make soups and stews.

Great way to mix up the menu and simplify food storage issues. Do it yourself.
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Old 02-20-2013, 11:48 AM
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I've never considered soup mixes. If there's one thing anyone can cook from scratch, it's soup. So much cheaper that way to. I am a bit concerned with the shelf life of most bullion. Have not been able to find much info on that. I know it contains fats, but stored with O2 absorbers in 40-50 degree climate, I would think it could last quite awhile. I hope so, or I'm gonna be eating a ton of soup over the next year.
It depends on the buillion. The salt-lick cubes have fat and don't last as well. But many of the powdered versions have none and last very well. These are the types that the food storage companies pack in #10 cans with O2 absorbers. But they taste like salt licks too.

I find the best broth bases come from Asian markets. These folks know soup. Their mixes are less salty, more flavorful, and last extremely well. The downside is that a lot of the labels have very little English so it's sort of a crap shoot trying them until you find the ones you like. On the positive side, they're usually extremely cheap compared to the American salt lick varieties.

And they come in all sorts of flavors that we aren't used to seeing. Everything from the usual beef and pork, to ham, seafoods of various types, etc.
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Old 02-20-2013, 11:52 AM
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Question on the Bear Creek mixes. I wonder if you put them in a deep freezer if they would last longer? MikeK? Anyone? I have a bunch. We use them for a soup base to add our ingredients to make them better and tastier. I might have to experiment some with mine nearing expiration. I don't see why they would not last much longer.
Old 02-20-2013, 12:18 PM
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I don't see any reason why they wouldn't last longer if frozen. Just like anything else...

The chili, chicken noodle soup, minestrone, gumbo and vegetable beef should freeze nicely. Check the ingredients for some of the others with milk/cheese and high oil content, they might not. Just my guess on this.
Old 02-20-2013, 01:09 PM
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Question on the Bear Creek mixes. I wonder if you put them in a deep freezer if they would last longer? MikeK? Anyone? I have a bunch. We use them for a soup base to add our ingredients to make them better and tastier. I might have to experiment some with mine nearing expiration. I don't see why they would not last much longer.
Cold temperatures slow down chemical reactions. Part of food degradation is chemical in nature. So I'm sure it would extend the life quite a bit. I like their soups too. If I find a deal on them, I may pick some up and store them in the freezer too. My experience with them stored in cans with O2 absorbers was sure less than satisfactory.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:54 PM
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Thanks for al,lthe responses! I'm thinking it would just be better to buy the ingredients and store separately until use, like several of you suggested.
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