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Old 11-26-2012, 03:46 AM
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Default Home Made Snares



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How to make a 1/16 size 48" long snare.

While these snares are not as good as professional snares, they are easy and cheap to make. You could make them in a survival situation.

This snare is would be for small game such as rabbit, marten, groundhog, beaver, fox, lynx, raccoon, and bobcat. Also other small animals of similar size not listed.

You can use this same tutorial to make larger snares just use larger materials.
The 3/8" washer will work for 3/32 cable as well but you will need a larger washer for larger sized cables. Also your holes will need to be drilled accordingly.

In place of the 1/16" cable you can also use wire for hanging pictures in an emergency situation although it does not have the strength of cable. Also once you buy your cable if it came off a roll at the hardware store try not to wad up the wire because it will have memory from being on the roll that you will need for the snare.

Items needed
1 - 3/8" flat washer
1 - 1/16" cable ferrel
1 - 1/16" cable stop
1 - piece of 1/16" galvanized cable in the length you wish to make your snare.
Various tools


Step 1
Take your washer and mark it in the middle so that you make hole on each side, drill the 1st hole with a 5/64" drill bit then the other with a 3/32" drill bit. Mark which hole is which. Then clean the edges of the holes with a 1/8" bit to make the cable slide smooth without snagging. Note I used a small piece of wood to keep from drilling into my work bench.









Step 2
Turn your washer and mark it the opposite way of the holes down the center. Then on that mark bend the washer 90 degrees. This is easiest done after clamping the washer into a vice then using a small hammer.






Step 3
Now insert your cable stop onto 1 end of you cable and crimp it on. If you do not have a pair of crimps avalible you can use a pair or plyers or side cutters just make sure you do not cut them through if you use side cutters.







Step 4
Now insert you washer onto your wire using the 5/64" side. When you slide on washer make sure the 90 degree bend faces out from the cable end (see pic) This is very important to make your snare work properly. After you have inserted the washer slide it all the way down to your cable stop





Step 5
Now insert the the end of the cable into the 3/32" hole from the triangle side. once you start sliding it through you may notice that it seems out of wack you may need to roll the wire with your fingers to line it out to where the memory holds the loop easily. If rolling the wire does not work you may need to put memory into the wire (tutorial coming soon). Do not move on from here until you have proper memory in the wire or the snare will not function properly.







Step 6
Next will be to make the tie down loop at the other end of the snare. To do so insert the end of the cable into the ferrel and run the wire through. once you have done so place the end of the wire back into the ferrel going the opposite direction you ran it through the first time. You can adjust the size of your loop by pulling the end of the cable running to your snare. Leave 1/8-1/4" of the end of the cable sticking out. Crimp your ferrel into place, if you do not have crimpers you can use plyers or side cutters being careful not to cut into the ferrel just to crimp it.











Step 7
Dye or paint your snare whichever you choose if you wise. No pictures in this section as I will do a tutorial on this subject alone.



Step 8
Storing and marking your snare for later use. If you have elected to use your snare at a later time or are making them for your bug out bag you will need to keep them seperated by size and length and mark them so you grab the right snare the first time. For long term storage you can place them in a ziplock bag which is marked with what snares are in that back. If you want to put multiple snares in a single back you may want to use something to keep the separated. You can see how I placed a black zip tie then cliped it off to store it. You can store them in anything you choose you just want to make sure they form a circle so you do not loose your cable memory.








That is all have fun trapping and remember to follow all local, state and federal laws while trapping.
Old 11-26-2012, 08:34 AM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
How to make a 1/16 size 48" long snare.

While these snares are not as good as professional snares, they are easy and cheap to make. You could make them in a survival situation.

This snare is would be for small game such as rabbit, marten, groundhog, beaver, fox, lynx, raccoon, and bobcat. Also other small animals of similar size not listed.

You can use this same tutorial to make larger snares just use larger materials.
The 3/8" washer will work for 3/32 cable as well but you will need a larger washer for larger sized cables. Also your holes will need to be drilled accordingly.

In place of the 1/16" cable you can also use wire for hanging pictures in an emergency situation although it does not have the strength of cable. Also once you buy your cable if it came off a roll at the hardware store try not to wad up the wire because it will have memory from being on the roll that you will need for the snare.

Items needed
1 - 3/8" flat washer
1 - 1/16" cable ferrel
1 - 1/16" cable stop
1 - piece of 1/16" galvanized cable in the length you wish to make your snare.
Various tools


Step 1
Take your washer and mark it in the middle so that you make hole on each side, drill the 1st hole with a 5/64" drill bit then the other with a 3/32" drill bit. Mark which hole is which. Then clean the edges of the holes with a 1/8" bit to make the cable slide smooth without snagging. Note I used a small piece of wood to keep from drilling into my work bench.









Step 2
Turn your washer and mark it the opposite way of the holes down the center. Then on that mark bend the washer 90 degrees. This is easiest done after clamping the washer into a vice then using a small hammer.






Step 3
Now insert your cable stop onto 1 end of you cable and crimp it on. If you do not have a pair of crimps avalible you can use a pair or plyers or side cutters just make sure you do not cut them through if you use side cutters.







Step 4
Now insert you washer onto your wire using the 5/64" side. When you slide on washer make sure the 90 degree bend faces out from the cable end (see pic) This is very important to make your snare work properly. After you have inserted the washer slide it all the way down to your cable stop





Step 5
Now insert the the end of the cable into the 3/32" hole from the triangle side. once you start sliding it through you may notice that it seems out of wack you may need to roll the wire with your fingers to line it out to where the memory holds the loop easily. If rolling the wire does not work you may need to put memory into the wire (tutorial coming soon). Do not move on from here until you have proper memory in the wire or the snare will not function properly.







Step 6
Next will be to make the tie down loop at the other end of the snare. To do so insert the end of the cable into the ferrel and run the wire through. once you have done so place the end of the wire back into the ferrel going the opposite direction you ran it through the first time. You can adjust the size of your loop by pulling the end of the cable running to your snare. Leave 1/8-1/4" of the end of the cable sticking out. Crimp your ferrel into place, if you do not have crimpers you can use plyers or side cutters being careful not to cut into the ferrel just to crimp it.











Step 7
Dye or paint your snare whichever you choose if you wise. No pictures in this section as I will do a tutorial on this subject alone.



Step 8
Storing and marking your snare for later use. If you have elected to use your snare at a later time or are making them for your bug out bag you will need to keep them seperated by size and length and mark them so you grab the right snare the first time. For long term storage you can place them in a ziplock bag which is marked with what snares are in that back. If you want to put multiple snares in a single back you may want to use something to keep the separated. You can see how I placed a black zip tie then cliped it off to store it. You can store them in anything you choose you just want to make sure they form a circle so you do not loose your cable memory.








That is all have fun trapping and remember to follow all local, state and federal laws while trapping.

Very nicely done. I don't know why you think they are not as good as professional. I've been making a few snares and your post clarified a few things.
Old 11-26-2012, 08:38 AM
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I've saved the wiring bits from the wiring harness inside the broken window housing of my wives van to use for snares. They have a small braided steel cable that is part of the mechanism that ends up about 6-8 ft long full stretched out. In order to take out the old motor unit I had to remove the whole existing mechanism minus the window and window rails. This would work as an alternative to the 1/16th galvanized cable.
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Old 11-26-2012, 08:43 PM
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Sorry for ignorance, but what makes this any better than Thin high strength rope with a slip knot on it? Or a low-wrap noose for that matter? It just seems simpler to learn the knots and not have to carry around a steel wire that can cut up your bag.
Old 11-26-2012, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evialvatar View Post
I've saved the wiring bits from the wiring harness inside the broken window housing of my wives van to use for snares. They have a small braided steel cable that is part of the mechanism that ends up about 6-8 ft long full stretched out. In order to take out the old motor unit I had to remove the whole existing mechanism minus the window and window rails. This would work as an alternative to the 1/16th galvanized cable.
Yes this cable will probably work well. All you really need is a metallic cable. The galvanized cable is just best for rust resistance. Which more then likely the cable you have is galvanized anyways. Just remember you need to adjust your drill bit size to match the cable size you want it to be able to slide very freely. You can make at least 3 traps out of that length as well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jaybo1990 View Post
Sorry for ignorance, but what makes this any better than Thin high strength rope with a slip knot on it? Or a low-wrap noose for that matter? It just seems simpler to learn the knots and not have to carry around a steel wire that can cut up your bag.
You can use rope if need be but the steel cable is better because it will collapse in on itself when triggered if set properly. Speed and proper set is everything with a snare, a rope snare literally requires the animal to pull it tight on itself. Also this cable will not cut up your pack in anyway unless you did not properly make the snare and have a couple inches of overhang out of your ferrel or stop and it unravels would be the only way I could think of.

With that being said knowing your knots is very important in any situation not just to use them to trap. Also if you had no option small rope will work as well.
Old 12-07-2012, 05:59 PM
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Ronnie... thanks, the pictures sure help. I plan on making several of different sizes. I will assume that an 1/8 cable will be large enough for a deer? Since they are illegal to use now, here in my state, I'll just keep them in a safe place till TSHTF! Then the rule of law, rules & regulations will go out the window.
Old 12-07-2012, 06:13 PM
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Great thread!

Can you go over the placement of these snares for the best results?
Old 01-02-2013, 04:47 PM
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I have personally made a whole bunch of these snares..... and they work great.

i used smaller parts... don't ask me what size,

but i caught many ground squirrels and a few rabbits with em
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Old 01-06-2013, 01:43 AM
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What is the cost per snare in this tutorial, roughly? I'm thinking about adding snares to the BOB and trying to decide between building my own or buying pre-made snares. The pre-made ones I've found are $1.91 (including S/H) per snare.

Thanks!
Old 01-11-2013, 01:45 AM
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when I first came to the forum it was a snare post that brought me here. thank you for the informative post.
Old 01-12-2013, 02:27 PM
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Good post thanks.....never actually seen how to make a "real" snare....I got the idea to carry guitar strings in my BOB..they work pretty good.
Old 01-12-2013, 02:41 PM
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Thanks Ronnnie, nice photos, very well done!!!!
Old 01-16-2013, 02:27 PM
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When I ran a snare line I used annealed nuts for stops and .22LR cases with the primer cut off and a little epoxy putty which I crimped on with an anvil style brush cutter to make the loops. Nuts are annealed by putting in a can or stringing on a wire and putting them in the fire and letting it cool. Annealing may not be necessary but unannealed nuts can crack when hammered on and the hard threads may cut into the cable. Both cheaper than buying ferrules. Size the nuts to just fit on the cable used. You can also use an annealed nut that just fits the doubled cable for loops.

I also used either 3/16" or 1/4" washers for the locks.
Old 01-16-2013, 03:02 PM
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with the hole so close in diameter as the cable, you would think it would drag and not tighten correctly. Sort of like when I want to adjust my damn seat belt and it locks on me... stupid seat belts...
Old 01-16-2013, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nugor View Post
When I ran a snare line I used annealed nuts for stops and .22LR cases with the primer cut off and a little epoxy putty which I crimped on with an anvil style brush cutter to make the loops. Nuts are annealed by putting in a can or stringing on a wire and putting them in the fire and letting it cool. Annealing may not be necessary but unannealed nuts can crack when hammered on and the hard threads may cut into the cable. Both cheaper than buying ferrules. Size the nuts to just fit on the cable used. You can also use an annealed nut that just fits the doubled cable for loops.

I also used either 3/16" or 1/4" washers for the locks.
Another very easy way to anneal the nuts is to put them on an electric coil stove and turn the burner on High, and once the nuts are glowing, turn it off. It works very fast, and works very well. Never had a problem hurting the burners either.
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Old 01-18-2013, 12:21 PM
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Thanks for the awesome thread. I had cable just waiting for a project like this..i played a bit with hole sizes to get things right. I now have a doz with extra ferrules and washers drilled in three sizes just in case for future use. Thanks a bunch!!!
Old 01-18-2013, 07:22 PM
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Great info.
Years ago as a scout leader we made some snares bucause we were near a lake and there were a lot of game. It was a survival activity patch the kids were working on. There was no food taken into the area for a two day outing.
We ate well.
Old 01-22-2013, 08:18 AM
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One way to "dye" the snares is a basic stain I used to do to my new conibear traps in the 70s. I used walnut skins, and oak leaves, along with water. Boiled it for a few hours, then set the traps in the barrel to soak over night, or for a couple of days.

The traps looked almost a flat chocolate brown, which was a good color for the hardwood forests I trapped in.

Last edited by Woofbarkenarf; 01-22-2013 at 08:18 AM.. Reason: misspelled words
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Old 01-22-2013, 11:37 PM
n2xlr8n n2xlr8n is offline
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Q for the trappin folks in relation to this post....

Any reason you use braided snare wire in particular?

I have a large quantity of "Malin" wire in various lengths and tests, and it seems it would fit the bill quite nicely...but I know squat about trapping

Great post, thank you.
Old 01-22-2013, 11:47 PM
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Awesome post! Can this snare also be used for catching deer or is their a different snare construction specifically for that animal?
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