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Old 09-06-2012, 01:27 AM
9MMare 9MMare is offline
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Default How long do freshly laid eggs last in fridge?



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Is this any different than with store-bought eggs?

Does the chicken breed make any difference?

I'm not positive, but by this time tomorrow nite, I should be a chicken tractor and laying hen owner!

Cross your fingers!
Old 09-06-2012, 01:37 AM
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A rough rule of thumb is eggs are OK for about 6 weeks unrefrigerated, 6 months refrigerated. Although I can't imagine using eggs that are that old.

We keep our newest eggs in a bowl on the counter for about a week (I like looking at all the different colors haha) Then I rotate them to the frig at the end of each week. We have not had any trouble with ours in the 3 years we have been raising them.

Good luck with your chickens. Ours have provided hours of entertainment and the fresh eggs are a nice bonus.
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Old 09-06-2012, 01:43 AM
naturegirlmia naturegirlmia is offline
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If they are not washed, and kept in an airtight container in the refrigerator, they should still be fine (although the whites might be a little runnier than usual) 7 months later...maybe longer, but that's the longest I've ever stored them. (Note... although these "older eggs" weren't eaten by us, they looked and smelled fine, and the animals we gave them to suffered no ill effects).

MAJOR difference from storebought eggs. For one thing, storebought eggs are often three-four months old before they ever reach the store shelves. For another, the eggs have been washed and bleached... this destroys the protective powder-thin coat that is on the egg (in nature, it keeps bacteria out until the hen has enough eggs to hatch out). Washing the eggs makes them LOOK prettier, but it also drastically decreases their expiration time. It's better to leave them UNWASHED, then wash each egg as it is used.
As far as breeds? We've had SEVERAL breeds. Other than shell color, or the size of the egg (which, except in the case of Bantams, seems to vary by hen more than breed), we've had no real difference in quality. Some breeds lay better or longer than others, but the quality is equally good... in other words, WAY better than store bought!
Good luck with your flock!
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Old 09-06-2012, 01:48 AM
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You leave them unrefrigerated for a week? Wow!

I keep store-bought eggs in the fridge for a month with no problems.....if I can get that with unwashed homegrown eggs, that's more than enough. Do they have to be in an airtight container or is a regular, saved, store-bought paper egg carton ok?
Old 09-06-2012, 01:48 AM
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Oh, and I will be checking back to see what/how cleaning homegrown eggs need before use.
Old 09-06-2012, 02:33 AM
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Yes. They are normally good up to 6 weeks on the container as long as you do not wash the bloom off.
You can use sandpaper to get off the dirt spots or I use a green scratchy pad on the occasions I find a dirty one. I have more problems with dirty eggs with my ducks as they like to roll them in the dirt. I imagine trying to hide them.
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:07 AM
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I never wash my eggs , even dirty ones

Two years of having layer hens and I have not ben sick yet !

I know it;s a bad idea , but it's true
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Old 09-06-2012, 07:10 AM
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Years ago we tried a product called "Ke-Peg"...you take a fresh laid egg, less than 12 hours old, and if no "dirt" on it, smear this stuff on them and set them back in the carton in a cool, dry place. After 6 months, in my back room in the mtns of NM, we tried them. White, runny and yellow was flat, but tasted fine. After a year, still the same...beyond the year, we fed them to the chickens, they preferred their scrambled...lol...that's one way we tried.

Have a friend in Ireland who says she, her mother and grandmother never fridged their eggs at all, just stored them in a cool dark place unwashed. Kept for months.
Old 09-06-2012, 07:25 AM
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ive heard that putting , i think, mineral oil on them can make them last alot longer.
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Old 09-06-2012, 10:19 AM
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Anything that stops air from traviling throw the shell will increase it's life - This is why many dont wash them untill their ready for use their laid with a coating on them
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Old 09-06-2012, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9MMare View Post
You leave them unrefrigerated for a week? Wow!

. . . snip
Consider this, a Hen can lay one egg per day, but hatch a clutch of a half dozen all on the same day.

When laid, an egg will not start to develop. It can sit in the nest for as long as a week while other eggs are laid. When the Hen sits on the eggs and brings them up to incubation temperature, they will all start to develop at the same time and thatch 21 days latter.

Not only can an egg sit on the counter for a week, but you can put it back under the hen and it will hatch.
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Old 09-06-2012, 07:59 PM
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It can sit in the nest for as long as a week while other eggs are laid. When the Hen sits on the eggs and brings them up to incubation temperature, they will all start to develop at the same time and thatch 21 days latter.
I've hatched plenty of 10-14 day old eggs that were kept in a fridge before the last egg was collected while re-growing my flock after a catastrophic weasel attack and only was getting 0-2 eggs per day.
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Old 09-06-2012, 08:25 PM
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I've done the same thing.
Old 09-06-2012, 08:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9MMare View Post
You leave them unrefrigerated for a week? Wow!

I keep store-bought eggs in the fridge for a month with no problems.....if I can get that with unwashed homegrown eggs, that's more than enough. Do they have to be in an airtight container or is a regular, saved, store-bought paper egg carton ok?
paper is fine for six months. Never made them airtight myself.
Old 09-06-2012, 11:06 PM
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I've hatched plenty of 10-14 day old eggs that were kept in a fridge before the last egg was collected while re-growing my flock after a catastrophic weasel attack and only was getting 0-2 eggs per day.
Interesting, I would have thought the cold would have killed them.

How cold is your fridge?
Old 09-06-2012, 11:47 PM
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Interesting, I would have thought the cold would have killed them.

How cold is your fridge?
*shrug*

Above freezing is about all I can tell you. I think it's set to somewhere between 2-3 on a 1-6 scale. Things are cold-ish, but I wouldn't put a gallon of milk in the door.
Old 09-07-2012, 01:53 AM
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I got them!



Here's the chicken tractor.



The hen house has 2 nest boxes



Introducing...the Go-Gos! Belinda, Jane, Gina, & Charlotte. So far, all but one are laying. One just started last month.
Old 09-07-2012, 01:55 AM
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Thanks to everyone for your advice. I have been reading and researching this for awhile, but this opportunity came up quickly and was too good to pass up. I am not prepared on a more practical level!

I will have lots more questions.
Old 09-07-2012, 03:22 AM
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I'm not 100% sure on how long the eggs will stay fresh, but I know how to check the eggs if you're worried one might have gone bad. Fill a glass with cool water and place the egg inside. If the egg floats, it is no longer fresh. A friend of mine (who considers herself quite the food snob) taught me this. It's saved me from throwing out eggs just because they were a few days past the expiration date stamped on the carton!
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:56 AM
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I have been told the USDA defines the phrase 'Farm Fresh' as being 8-weeks old minimum. Store-bought eggs have been aged to meet the USDA requirement for 'Farm Fresh'.

I find that customers want pretty and clean eggs. They complain about water-marks and color variations on egg shells, and will simply buy from another vendor.

Our eggs are laid on the ground, I collect daily. From being on moist soil and possibly pooped on, many of them have stains.

I produce white, green and brown eggs; I try to mix-up each dozen. I was hoping for that as our marketing strategy.

I see other vendors stick strictly to dark brown eggs, and have wire-cages. Dark brown eggs do not show the stains as mush as lighter color eggs, and being laid on wire they have no contact with soil. Customers openly prefer those eggs.

What counts now as 'free-range' is totally open to interpretation. If you avoid having one-chicken per one-cage, then you can get away with calling your chickens 'free-range'. 6 hens in a 3'X6' pen gets labeled as free-range chickens.


Also; anyone producing eggs needs to learn to be good at candling. I candle most evenings, it is quick and easy to do. You learn a lot about what is happening inside each egg. This allows you to avoid eggs that have bacterial infections inside.
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