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Old 08-24-2012, 10:09 AM
rgswaim rgswaim is offline
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Default Kerosene and diesel fuel?



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Are these two interchangable? I was at the gas station yesterday and noticed the prices of these. Diesel fuel was $3.99 per gallon and kerosene was $5.75 per gallon. The question never occuired to me but can they be used to replance each other?
Old 08-24-2012, 10:12 AM
NorCalWoody NorCalWoody is offline
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We would run kerosene in our diesel vehicles in the winter so the diesel fuel would not gel during the really could months.
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:10 AM
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not sure how diesel would do in lamps. too much smoke and smell? same for kerosene stoves and heaters.
Old 08-24-2012, 02:16 PM
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I just talked to a farmer the other night who indicated you can put diesel into a kerosene heater. He mentioned a specific kind of diesel that I can't remember the name of.
Old 08-24-2012, 02:53 PM
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I know the trucks in the Northern states use number 1 grade diesel in the Winter because it is stable to lower temps than the grade 2 normally used by every one. I have seen it called for in heaters but you cant buy it here. It is more refined than # 2 but I dont think it would be suitable for indoor use due to smoke and smell.
Old 08-24-2012, 04:31 PM
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They are NOT interchangeable. Kerosene does not have the lubricity needed to be used in a diesel engine. It will cause premature failure of the injection pump. If you find a situation where you must use kerosene in your diesel engine, add a quart of oil to every tank.

Number 1 diesel will work in a "must have" situation in a kerosene heater but it will smoke and smell more and if it is a wick type heater it will carbon up the wick much faster than kerosene.
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Packitup View Post
They are NOT interchangeable. Kerosene does not have the lubricity needed to be used in a diesel engine. It will cause premature failure of the injection pump. If you find a situation where you must use kerosene in your diesel engine, add a quart of oil to every tank.

Number 1 diesel will work in a "must have" situation in a kerosene heater but it will smoke and smell more and if it is a wick type heater it will carbon up the wick much faster than kerosene.
Exactly. The base fuels are the same, but there is an additive package in diesel. K1 kerosene is the same base as number 1 diesel. And number 2 heating oil is the same base as number 2 diesel. But they are not interchangeable. Burning diesel in kerosene appliances will throw off all sorts of nasty volatiles.
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Old 08-24-2012, 11:13 PM
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They are not the same. I once had to put Kerosene in a diesel truck because I was about ready to flame out in bum^*$&* SC, and the only fuel station didn't carry diesel.
I made a nice smoke screen behind me on the way home, and instead of 40 MPG, I got less around 30.
Old 08-24-2012, 11:55 PM
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Kerosene is a "lighter" form of fuel than diesel.

But it is a rather generic term, just like diesel is, so it depends on the grade and mix of the fuel. There is diesel fuel oil for home furnaces that is not meant for diesel IC engines (but would work okay if you had to use it). You could mix kerosene with diesel if you had to stretch out miles, but as mentioned it doesn't have as much lubricity as automotive diesel fuel.

I recommend you shop around for diesel fuel - I have seen it vary by as much as 40 cents a gallon around here depending on where you buy it.

Also, you can use propane fumigation to get better mileage and more power.

In some areas you can even get CNG and use it with fumigation to really save some money, but most locales do not have public CNG refueling.

I intend to install propane fumigation on my truck and at my house (generator) to save money and stretch my fuel supplies - plus to diversify my fuel sources.
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:16 AM
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I have burned lots of stove fuel in my truck. I have even burned jet fuel mixed with diesel. The colder it is the lighter grade of fuel you can burn. No 1 stove fuel works great in the winter, but in the summer will degrade your injection pump rather quickly. One thing I have heard of happening to others is some newer engines use an optic eye to check the fuel viscousity, if the fuel is dyed it doesn't work correctly.
Old 08-25-2012, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Packitup View Post
They are NOT interchangeable. Kerosene does not have the lubricity needed to be used in a diesel engine.
Packitup's correct...just rub the both of them between your fingers and it will be quickly apparent.
Old 11-25-2013, 08:47 AM
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Actually, for heating oil, you can use "off-road" diesel to replace fuel oil or kerosene. I live in Ohio and have done that a few times until the delivery would arrive. It is much cheaper than kerosene.
Old 11-25-2013, 09:47 AM
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I've put diesel into my home heating oil tank -- never a problem --

Diesel is taxed higher --
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Old 11-25-2013, 01:28 PM
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It's true that the two fuels aren't equal, but they can be substituted with the other in a pinch.

I operated a diesel power plant in Antarctica in a previous life. Instead of diesel, we used a grade of JP fuel (either 5 or 8, I don't remember which). The big Cat diesels ran normally, but had shortened lives to do the lack of lubricity. Heads should have lasted well beyond their 10,000 hour service period. However, we would drop valves just after 9,000 almost to the hour. Keep in mind, these were locomotive based gen sets that had a dedicated mechanic. They weren't unmaintained, light off and forget units.

Given that JP fuel is closer to diesel than kerosene, you could probably expect even more reduction in service life.

That being said, if it's all you have to power your BOV, then go for it. A few gallons probably won't matter much over the long haul. As someone else posted, add a bit of motor oil to regain some lubricity if it becomes more a regular thing. But at that point, you'd probably want to have a spare injection pump laying around.
Old 11-25-2013, 01:48 PM
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I changed out an injection pump on a farm tractor that was used to mow a local airport, they were burning jet fuel in it, the shop where I carried the pump to could not rebuild it, it was worn out to the point that a new one was in order. Jet fuel is a high grade of kerosene.
Old 11-25-2013, 02:53 PM
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It would be best to check with the equipment maker to see what works. Our Toyotomi vented heater can use the ULSD, #1 Fuel oil & K-1.
http://www.toyotomiusa.com/ownersMan...aters_ulsd.php

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Old 11-25-2013, 02:56 PM
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You can get lubricity additives. Seems like that would be a must have. I run it in mine simply because it wasn't designed for this ultra low sulfur diesel.
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Old 11-25-2013, 06:35 PM
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standyne makes a additive for low lubricity fuels in older machines.if i had to use kero in a deisel id just add a qaurt per 10 gal of dextron.
Old 11-26-2013, 12:38 AM
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I have run diesel in my kerosene heater. It's an old Kerosun, I use in my shop area.

It burns dirtier, so you have clean it more frequently and it has a stronger smell. After I ran out the 5 gallons I bought.. I didn't buy anymore of it and went back to kerosene.

It seemed to warm well enough though.
Old 11-26-2013, 09:43 AM
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Running 100% kerosene in newer diesels is not a good idea


-The distillation of diesel happens 200 C (392 F) and 350 C (662 F) with carbon chains between 8 and 21 carbon atoms per molecule.

-And the distillation of petroleum between 150 C and 275 C, resulting in a mixture of carbon chains between 6 and 16 carbon atoms per molecule.

In short diesel has has heavier and more complex aromatic compounds. Diesel has a higher cetane/ BTU than Kerosene has a higher viscosity and with the new ULSD they add lubricants to it because diesel fuel provides lubrication for fuel pump and injectors this is a particular concern in newer common rail diesel. Kerosene lacks all the lubricating properties, If you run it it's best to add an aftermarket lube like power service, lucus
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