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Old 08-22-2012, 03:28 PM
davegill09 davegill09 is offline
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Default How long do Pinto Beans last without Mylar Bags



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I am putting some Pinto Beans, Kidney Beans, and Garbanzo Beans in Mylar bags but it is very time consuming. I want to keep some in the brown bags they come in. How long wll they last in the brown paper bags without loosing taste nutrition and quality?
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:33 PM
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I have had beans of various kinds in a shelf for a few years, they are still good to eat. As long as you store them cold, dry and away from sunlight you should be good for a few years at least. You can always put them in a container of some kind to keep them from moisture and the elements, a regular plastic bucket with lid should be enough. My beans did however come in plastic bags.
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Old 08-22-2012, 04:01 PM
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If you're in a dry climate, they will last a couple years or so. But they begin to harden over time to where they won't cook soft. I have no problems keeping them in my cupboard for 2-3 years. Pintos seem to harden the fastest.

You can still use them after they harden, but you have to grind them first. For long term storage, mylar and O2 absorbers are the way to go.
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Old 08-22-2012, 04:05 PM
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My experience with pinto beans in particular is that after 3 years they get "hard" it takes longer to soak them even using a pressure cooker they take longer to cook. These are stored in the original platic bag wrapping from the store.

However, if you have a good grain grinder you can grind them up and make refrieds out of them, or use them for flour.

I have also planted these old beans and found that most of the would germinate. Seeing that I have about 150 lbs in storage, I'm not throwing any of them away. However, lately with fresh beans, I have been vacuum sealing them in poly bags with a Food Saver.
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Old 08-22-2012, 04:05 PM
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I keep some in glass canning jars, after freezing them for a couple of weeks to kill the bugs. After a couple of years they do harden though.
Old 08-22-2012, 04:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
If you're in a dry climate, they will last a couple years or so. But they begin to harden over time to where they won't cook soft. I have no problems keeping them in my cupboard for 2-3 years. Pintos seem to harden the fastest.

You can still use them after they harden, but you have to grind them first. For long term storage, mylar and O2 absorbers are the way to go.
With Mylar and o2 do they still harden ? Does it delay hardening ? And other then grind and cook any other option ?
Old 08-22-2012, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth9669 View Post
With Mylar and o2 do they still harden ? Does it delay hardening ? And other then grind and cook any other option ?
It seems to delay the hardening. I'm not sure what causes it. I once heard that the oils in the beans dry out (or maybe oxidizes?).

I don't know of other options. Once they're hard they will not cook soft no matter what you do. So, grinding is about the only option. You might could sprout them to soften them then cook as normal.

But if you're going to store them long term, it only makes sense to pack them in mylar with O2 absorbers. Food storage is not the place to cut corners. It, along with water, is critical.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:18 PM
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If beans are older they have to simmer a long time to cook them well. Older beans also do better with the presoak overnight method than the bring to a boil and let sit an hour presoak method. Once the presoaking is done and the cooking starts, bring them to a boil and then simmer for a couple of hours, check them and you may have to add another 30 minutes or so. If you are adding any tomato products to your beans, don't add them until the beans are fork tender or add 30 - 60 minutes additional cooking time.

I'm going to try the sprouting and then cooking idea. Does it change the protein content of the beans?
Old 08-22-2012, 08:31 PM
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If beans are older they have to simmer a long time to cook them well. Older beans also do better with the presoak overnight method than the bring to a boil and let sit an hour presoak method. Once the presoaking is done and the cooking starts, bring them to a boil and then simmer for a couple of hours, check them and you may have to add another 30 minutes or so. If you are adding any tomato products to your beans, don't add them until the beans are fork tender or add 30 - 60 minutes additional cooking time.

I'm going to try the sprouting and then cooking idea. Does it change the protein content of the beans?
It doesn't change the protein content any. Walton Feed used to have information showing the nutritional change from sprouting beans. They have changed their website several times but may still have it up. www.waltonfeed.com

If you get beans that are hard enough, there's no amount of soaking or cooking that will soften them. I've encountered it before. Even a pressure cooker won't soften them after an overnight soak.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:33 PM
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According to Jackie Clay, writing in the Backwoods Home Emergency Survival Guide, been seeds recovered from native American dig sites were sprouted after 400 yrs.

I'm sure they were very hard and not easily cooked. But they were still viable seeds, so they could be used somehow.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
It doesn't change the protein content any. Walton Feed used to have information showing the nutritional change from sprouting beans. They have changed their website several times but may still have it up. www.waltonfeed.com

If you get beans that are hard enough, there's no amount of soaking or cooking that will soften them. I've encountered it before. Even a pressure cooker won't soften them after an overnight soak.
Thanks for the link.

Wow, I've been fortunate not to ever to run into beans I couldn't eventually soften in 40 years of bean cooking. I've wrestled with some but I always won. What a challenge, grrrrr.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mels thinkingitover View Post
Thanks for the link.

Wow, I've been fortunate not to ever to run into beans I couldn't eventually soften in 40 years of bean cooking. I've wrestled with some but I always won. What a challenge, grrrrr.
Pintos are really bad at it after they sit around a few years. I scrapped most of a 50lb bag a few years back.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:07 PM
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How long do pinto beans, northern beans etc keep if they are canned in a #10 can with absorber.?
Old 08-22-2012, 09:20 PM
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How long do pinto beans, northern beans etc keep if they are canned in a #10 can with absorber.?
20 years or more. They're one of the foods that lasts really well in storage when packed properly.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:54 PM
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Looks like I need to buy a mill or my bucket-o-beans are not as useful as I thought. I'll keep them the 20-25 years and if I need them grind them I will.
Old 08-23-2012, 08:06 AM
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I have beans that are 10 years old that were stored in buckets in the original packs. They are harder than fresh from the store. Put them in water (with whatever salt/spices/etc) in a slow oven along with a tough piece of meat I am braising and they come out fine. No, they don't turn to mush like the fresh ones do, but they are just fine. It may take overnight, it may take till the next day, but they are good and a damn sight better than canned.

People need to stop trying to duplicate everyday food with food storage and instead try to make good food from food storage. It is the same as cooking game meats: if you take a piece of deer and use it as if it were a piece of grain-fed beef it will be no good. If you use it as if it were a piece of deer, it will be excellent. (That means either braise it or cook it quite rare, but not in between.) Same with beans. Dry old beans cook take a long time to cook and don't end up the same as fresh ones, but at an extremely low simmer for 12-24 hours, they cook up into excellent food.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:49 AM
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I've opened one of the LTS cans of beans that I got about 8 years ago. They were NOT as hard as the ones I packed myself with a food saver vacuum system 4 years ago but they took forever compared to the newer ones of less than a year.

Mine were stored in pretty close to ideal conditions for all three samples.

I did finally grind some of them down in order to make a bean soup. It was tasty but even after a really slow and long simmer they had hard bits in there.

The fuel to cook them for that long negates their utility...at least for me...if I don't really need them so I'm replacing them and putting those old ones in the garage somewhere in case I ever need to plant them.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:11 PM
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You said hard bits even after grinding and cooking them. Can you soak the ground up beans then cook to save fuel and a better end product ?
Old 08-23-2012, 08:28 PM
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I found a solution just a couple of weeks ago. I had about 20 pounds of beans that had been stored in plastic kitchen bins, not quite air tight. I did not want to waste them.

So I canned them.

I soaked them overnight then cooked them to soften them first, between 30 and 90 minutes (the pinto beans were the hardest). After cooking, I packed them into pint jars and processed pressure canned them for 75 minutes at the appropriate pressure for my elevation. Basically, the same formula as canning meat.

Now, the beans make for a quick meal, rather than the pre-planning of overnight. My wife prefers it!
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:45 PM
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I can dry beans all the time. 1- cup dry beans to 1- quart fill with water add 1- tsp salt pressure can 90 minutes at 10 lbs of pressure. Done this for years no soaking.
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