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Old 06-22-2012, 09:41 PM
trx680 trx680 is offline
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Default long term CHEESE storage



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Any here have any experience with storing cheese for say.....3-5 years? I'm not talking about refrigerated cheeses.
Old 06-22-2012, 10:13 PM
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I have some hard chezze waxed that I have had for over 5 years

from my knowledge the only chezze that stores without refirgeration is hard pasta type of chezes , and it still has to be kept cool
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:18 PM
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This interests me... I love cheese, almost more than some good beef.

Only cheese I have so far in preps are things like MRE cheese spread, which has long shelf life.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:22 PM
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Cheese wheels are your best bet but the best ones are really expensive,

Here is a real hardcore one I ran across while looking. It's only $2,128.60 plus shipping.

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Old 06-22-2012, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heartlander View Post
Cheese wheels are your best bet but the best ones are really expensive,

Here is a real hardcore one I ran across while looking. It's only $2,128.60 plus shipping.

Parmigiano Reggiano, Bonati Riserva Cheese (Whole Wheel) Approximately 80 Lbs: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food
Perhaps then the best solution would be procedures to make our own cheese wheels or loafs and preserve them....
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:42 PM
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Well, for long term cheese storage, I'd buy a brand called 'A goat'. It has the added advantage of keeping the weeds down (which a wheel of Cheddar can't)

Of course, not so good for a city apartment
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:43 PM
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Perhaps then the best solution would be procedures to make our own cheese wheels or loafs and preserve them....
Perhaps......................
Old 06-22-2012, 10:45 PM
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hard cheeses like chedders that are in there original wheel and uncut can store for 10-15 years but good luck them not getting eaten before then I recommend keeping 2-5lb wheels and not any bigger
Old 06-22-2012, 10:50 PM
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Commercial cheeses are not designed for unrefrigerated storage. I don't know of anything that will preserve them. Waxing won't.

For long term storage, you need to start with a cheese that was made for it. It will have lower moisture and be higher in acid and salt. Many of them will store for years in their own wax.

So it's either pay big money for artisanal cheeses or learn to make your own.

There are some pretty good canned cheeses on the market. And it *may* be possible to can your own. But it's going to take some detective work to find safe recipes for it.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerJohn View Post
hard cheeses like chedders that are in there original wheel and uncut can store for 10-15 years but good luck them not getting eaten before then I recommend keeping 2-5lb wheels and not any bigger
Hmmm, great idea!
Medium size wheels of cheese might stack in a 5 gallon bucket, yes?
Old 06-22-2012, 10:53 PM
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Short term- Velveta, rotate it... Medium term- canned cheese. Long term- freeze dried cheese. A #10 can runs about $35. Cheddar, mozzerella, Colby, all sortsa options. Dry powder 'Kraft' style cheese powder is cheaper, stores long, and for mac 'n cheese with your own mac, might be a good option too.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:54 PM
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Hmmm, great idea!
Medium size wheels of cheese might stack in a 5 gallon bucket, yes?
not well because there round so there will be a huge amount of space not utilized unless you made them to custom shape to maximize the space most folks keep em in a cheese cave on shelves but you could find a way to store them efficiently i think stacking vertically in a log and making a box for them would be best
Old 06-22-2012, 11:26 PM
technoprepper technoprepper is online now
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Cheese is tricky. Most are packaged to require refrigeration though occasionally you see a shel stable package, such as in a gift basket. box Mac-n-cheese and velveta were reported to deteriorate by the date on the package which wasn't a very long shelf life (a year or less).

MRE cheeses spread.

some factory sealed containers of grated parmesan have 6 month expiration dates

nacho cheese sauce/dip is available in cans and jars Don't know how it holds up.

Hard cheese wheels dipped in cheese wax used to be stored without refrigeration. hard to get small wheels. Some have dipped their own. The cheeses get sharper with age and in some cases may separate. baby bell cheeses are very tiny wax dipped wheels, normally sold in the refrigerated section in the US but reportedly sold as shelf stable in europe. After 6months to a year cheese may become to sharp.

Northwoods sells a wide variety of shelf stable cheeses and sausages but doesn't have info on storage life on website.
http://www.northwoodscheese.com/

honeyville powdered cheese sauce in #10 cans is supposedly good for 3-5 years unopened in a cool dry place. Saratoga claims 10-20 years for theirs.

red feather/bega has small tuna cans of cheese sold in australia and new zealand for those without refrigeration. no expiration date.
http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/can...ar_cheese.aspx
Provident pantry has freeze dried shredded cheeses. About $40/can. The google ad suggests 25 year shelf life (which is what the claim for ither products) but they do not seem to make that claim on the product page
http://beprepared.com/product.asp?pn=FN%20C115

http://preparetodaywardnewsletter.bl...able-eggs.html

Watch your storage temperatures,
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Old 06-22-2012, 11:31 PM
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Wax em and keep at low temp and they last pretty good. I am just about to start doing this.

Main thing I learned is that they continue to age in the wax. As in if you want an aged cheddar in 5 years, you better like it strong or wax a mild cheese to begin with.
Old 06-22-2012, 11:32 PM
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http://preparednesspro.com/settling-...x-controversy/

good article on waxing cheese
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Old 06-22-2012, 11:38 PM
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Wax em and keep at low temp and they last pretty good. I am just about to start doing this.

Main thing I learned is that they continue to age in the wax. As in if you want an aged cheddar in 5 years, you better like it strong or wax a mild cheese to begin with.
ya but you can't take a cheese block out of the package and wax it and keep that long you really have to wax it right after its made other wise you can seal in contaminants
Old 06-22-2012, 11:49 PM
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ya but you can't take a cheese block out of the package and wax it and keep that long you really have to wax it right after its made other wise you can seal in contaminants
See, the research I have done says give the cheese a good washing in clean water (on a clean cloth), let it dry completely, and use food safe gloves when handling it and (as long as your wax is high enough temp when you dip it) you'll be fine.

What sort of "contaminants" would not be dealt with by those procedures?
Old 06-23-2012, 12:03 AM
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See, the research I have done says give the cheese a good washing in clean water (on a clean cloth), let it dry completely, and use food safe gloves when handling it and (as long as your wax is high enough temp when you dip it) you'll be fine.

What sort of "contaminants" would not be dealt with by those procedures?
have to be higher than 250F to kill botulism
Old 06-23-2012, 12:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Writer's Block View Post
Wax em and keep at low temp and they last pretty good. I am just about to start doing this.

Main thing I learned is that they continue to age in the wax. As in if you want an aged cheddar in 5 years, you better like it strong or wax a mild cheese to begin with.
Commercial cheeses are not safe to wax. They aren't designed with the right moisture, acid and salt level for it. A lot of people have tried it and most report that it soon rots. Even if it doesn't, it's a botulism risk because of the low O2 and low acidity.
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Old 06-23-2012, 04:10 AM
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Waxing cheeses work for long term storage IF you start with the right cheese AND do it right.

You need to start with a wheel of hard, low moisture cheeses like Colby, cheddar, parmesan, and Romano. You want to get the mildest cheese you can get because, like others said, it will continue to age.

I cut the wheels into 8 ounce blocks for convenience when consuming.

Wash the blocks well with _white_ vinegar. Set them on clean cooling rack & leave overnight, turning once.

Choose your wax wisely. You need to use cheese wax. Not parrafin or beeswax. Parrafin is too hard & will crack. Beeswax is too soft & will sag and crack during storage. You can get natural color, but I prefer the darker waxes - red or even better black. The dark wax helps keep light out. The dark waxes also make it easy to spot holes or thin areas in the wax. If you reuse your wax (see below), the dark ones are easier to clean.

Melt your wax in a double boiler. You're going to want to have an inner pan you can dedicate to wax - you're never going to get that pan clean again. An appropriate thermometer is a necessity here. Check your particular wax for the recommended temperature. You want it melted, hot enough, but not to the smoke point. The wax I use works well at 220 - 225 F.

Wax IS FLAMMABLE! If you get it too hot, remove from heat. If it catches fire, extinguish with a grease rated fire extinguisher or cap with a tight fitting lid. Do NOT try to put it out with water - it will just splatter & spread.

When the wax is holding at the correct temperature, after cleaning & sanitizing your hands, waxing can begin.

Hold a block firmly & dip it halfway into the cheese. You want to use an in & out motion. Don't hold it in the wax. We're aiming for several thin, even layers, not one thick glob. After dipping the first half, replace the block on the cooling rack with the side you just waxed upright.

Repeat this with the rest of your blocks. When you do the other end, hold the waxed end & dip the bare end far enough into the wax that you overlap the first end by at least 1/2" and return to the cooling rack.

You're going to repeat this at least 2 more times so you end up with 3 - 4 layers of wax. A trick I use to make sure there are no holes is to rotate the block 90 degrees when I begin a new layer so that every other layer covers the seam of the previous layer.

When you've completed waxing, remove the wax from the heat & let cool. When the wax is hardened, store the pot upside down so dust doesn't get into it.

When you store your cheese, you do NOT want to just stack them one on top of the other. You need to store them on shelves with some air space between the layers. If you have made blocks larger than 8 ounces, you're going to need to rotate them every 6 months or so or you risk gravity breaking the wax when it sags.

Make sure that your store age area is cooled & dry (8 - 15% humidity).

To label the blocks, after the wax is completely hardened, you can use a contrasting color wax "pencil". Another way is to use a paper label that you affix with some wax on the back like a sticker. To make sure it stays on, you can brush a little wax around the edges of the label. If you do this, use a silicone or boar bristle brush - others pick up too much or too little wax.

Remember, the cheese will continue to age. Even if you start with the mildest available, at 5+ years it's going to be super sharp. That's OK with us since we prefer it.

We store our cheeses in a cave that maintains 45 F & 12% humidity. So far (11 or 12 years now), we've had very few blocks spoil.

If you find you can't use an entire block, you can clean it with vinegar, dry overnight, and reward the cut end.

If you want to reuse your wax, you can do so very easily. Wash the wax with warm soapy water. Make sure you get ALL the oils & bits off then just throw it into your wax pot after drying it.
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