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Old 05-05-2012, 04:21 PM
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Default Remelting Candles



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Went garage saleing today and I got a bunch of different sized candles mainly white ones. This makes just about 300 candles that ive spent maybe 8 bucks on total since I been collecting candles.

I was thinking instead of having lots of small candles remelting and making several large ones instead.

but, I don't know what i'll need or how to go about it. So, I thought I would ask the experts on here. Can anyone help?
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Old 05-05-2012, 04:48 PM
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i remelted some candles in some sort of "survivalcandles"
i did it very simple
i used an electric grill
put the mold on it (in my case empty pellet tins)
fill them with chunks of wax
let it melt and added chunks until they were full enough
add the wicks
let them cool down

i dont know how big do you want them?

what you could use are empty paint cans (choose a size you want)
use cardboard as a wick
Old 05-05-2012, 04:56 PM
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You can get wicks at any craft store They are pretty cheep. I have melted candles on the stove top with low heat. The old style quart sized milk cartons make a good mold if you can find them. After the candle hardens you can just peel it away.
Old 05-05-2012, 05:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8valve View Post
i remelted some candles in some sort of "survivalcandles"
i did it very simple
i used an electric grill
put the mold on it (in my case empty pellet tins)
fill them with chunks of wax
let it melt and added chunks until they were full enough
add the wicks
let them cool down

i dont know how big do you want them?

what you could use are empty paint cans (choose a size you want)
use cardboard as a wick
Paint cans are just a little to big for my likings. I was thinking more like a regular canned food tin. So cardboard works as a wick? Thank you for your help.
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:10 PM
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It would be awesome if candles users looked into LED flashlights. You can run the newer LED lights for 50-70 hours per charge on low with much more light then a candle. They can be waterproof, windproof and it's extremely rare that they will burn you or burn your house down. LED lights can also shine farther, run longer and have more output. They can be used where candles can't. Ever rode a bike or walked out of an earthquake damaged building with a candle, ever used a candle in the wind or rain?

Maybe this will help:


Quote:

"Candle Statistics

Candles cause an estimated 15,600 fires in residential structures, 150 deaths, 1,270 injuries, and $539 million in estimated direct property damage each year.

Over half (55%) of home candle fires start because the candle is too close to some combustible material.
More candle fires (38%) begin in the bedroom than in any other room.
Falling asleep is a factor in 12% of home candle fires and 26% of the associated deaths.
Half of all civilian candle fire deaths occur between Midnight and 6am.
December is the peak month for candle fires; Christmas is the peak day.
Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle fires.
The risk of a fatal candle fire appears higher when candles are used for light."

http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/ho...ev/candle.shtm


Quote:

"Paraffin Wax

Most candles are made with paraffin wax as it is less expensive than other waxes (i.e. soy, beeswax). Paraffin is made from wax that is created after refining crude oil. Hydrocarbons that are capable of generating fossil fuels are found in paraffin wax. When a paraffin wax candle is burned, all kinds of chemicals are released into the air, the most dangerous being toluene and benzene. Both of these chemicals are solvents used in the manufacturing of glue and paint. Individuals who "huff" (sniff to get high) glue and paint are achieving an impaired state due to these solvents. Benzene is also a well-known carcinogen. A chemistry expert from Durham University, Dr. Andy Beeby, says that "[Benzene] is not a substance I would ever expose myself to in the lab." Other chemicals found in paraffin based scented candles are acetaladehyde, formaldehyde and naphthalene, all of which are known to cause problems with the respiratory tract."

http://www.ehow.com/list_7647900_dan...#ixzz1u2DAE3d2
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Technologist View Post
It would be awesome if candles users looked into LED flashlights. You can run the newer LED lights for 50-70 hours per charge on low with much more light then a candle. They can be waterproof, windproof and it's extremely rare that they will burn you or burn your house down. LED lights can also shine farther, run longer and have more output. They can be used where candles can't. Ever rode a bike or walked out of an earthquake damaged building with a candle, ever used a candle in the wind or rain?

Maybe this will help:


Quote:

"Candle Statistics

Candles cause an estimated 15,600 fires in residential structures, 150 deaths, 1,270 injuries, and $539 million in estimated direct property damage each year.

Over half (55%) of home candle fires start because the candle is too close to some combustible material.
More candle fires (38%) begin in the bedroom than in any other room.
Falling asleep is a factor in 12% of home candle fires and 26% of the associated deaths.
Half of all civilian candle fire deaths occur between Midnight and 6am.
December is the peak month for candle fires; Christmas is the peak day.
Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle fires.
The risk of a fatal candle fire appears higher when candles are used for light."

http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/ho...ev/candle.shtm


Quote:

"Paraffin Wax

Most candles are made with paraffin wax as it is less expensive than other waxes (i.e. soy, beeswax). Paraffin is made from wax that is created after refining crude oil. Hydrocarbons that are capable of generating fossil fuels are found in paraffin wax. When a paraffin wax candle is burned, all kinds of chemicals are released into the air, the most dangerous being toluene and benzene. Both of these chemicals are solvents used in the manufacturing of glue and paint. Individuals who "huff" (sniff to get high) glue and paint are achieving an impaired state due to these solvents. Benzene is also a well-known carcinogen. A chemistry expert from Durham University, Dr. Andy Beeby, says that "[Benzene] is not a substance I would ever expose myself to in the lab." Other chemicals found in paraffin based scented candles are acetaladehyde, formaldehyde and naphthalene, all of which are known to cause problems with the respiratory tract."

http://www.ehow.com/list_7647900_dan...#ixzz1u2DAE3d2
You have your thoughts I have mine. I've been burning candles for a good 35 yrs at least without a problem because I take lots of precautions when I use them. Besides, they're pretty, but thank you for that information.
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Technologist View Post
It would be awesome if candles users looked into LED flashlights. You can run the newer LED lights for 50-70 hours per charge on low with much more light then a candle. They can be waterproof, windproof and it's extremely rare that they will burn you or burn your house down. LED lights can also shine farther, run longer and have more output. They can be used where candles can't. Ever rode a bike or walked out of an earthquake damaged building with a candle, ever used a candle in the wind or rain?

Maybe this will help:


Quote:

"Candle Statistics

Candles cause an estimated 15,600 fires in residential structures, 150 deaths, 1,270 injuries, and $539 million in estimated direct property damage each year.

Over half (55%) of home candle fires start because the candle is too close to some combustible material.
More candle fires (38%) begin in the bedroom than in any other room.
Falling asleep is a factor in 12% of home candle fires and 26% of the associated deaths.
Half of all civilian candle fire deaths occur between Midnight and 6am.
December is the peak month for candle fires; Christmas is the peak day.
Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle fires.
The risk of a fatal candle fire appears higher when candles are used for light."

http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/ho...ev/candle.shtm


Quote:

"Paraffin Wax

Most candles are made with paraffin wax as it is less expensive than other waxes (i.e. soy, beeswax). Paraffin is made from wax that is created after refining crude oil. Hydrocarbons that are capable of generating fossil fuels are found in paraffin wax. When a paraffin wax candle is burned, all kinds of chemicals are released into the air, the most dangerous being toluene and benzene. Both of these chemicals are solvents used in the manufacturing of glue and paint. Individuals who "huff" (sniff to get high) glue and paint are achieving an impaired state due to these solvents. Benzene is also a well-known carcinogen. A chemistry expert from Durham University, Dr. Andy Beeby, says that "[Benzene] is not a substance I would ever expose myself to in the lab." Other chemicals found in paraffin based scented candles are acetaladehyde, formaldehyde and naphthalene, all of which are known to cause problems with the respiratory tract."

http://www.ehow.com/list_7647900_dan...#ixzz1u2DAE3d2
Good to point this out, people should know the dangers of something before they use it. That being said candles do have there place in many situations. They can be used to cook and keep bugs away just to name a couple.
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txplowgirl View Post
Paint cans are just a little to big for my likings. I was thinking more like a regular canned food tin. So cardboard works as a wick? Thank you for your help.
ive got two big paint can sized candles where there is cardboard in a square
in the middle

i know there are small paint cans (about the same size as a normal meal size veggies can)
if you dont fill it up all the way you have space for a lighter
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:23 PM
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It's a tough one as women love candles. My 18 year old Daughter also loves them.

You can back at me by telling me my quads, speed boats and motorcycles are suicide machines
Old 05-05-2012, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Technologist View Post
It's a tough one as women love candles. My 18 year old Daughter also loves them.

You can back at me by telling me my quads, speed boats and motorcycles are suicide machines
Nope, can't do that because I like them too.
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Old 05-05-2012, 07:09 PM
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What about using a few stubs to make Altoids tin emergency candles? While nothing can make an open flame completely safe, the lid reduces the danger.

http://blog.craftzine.com/archive/20...cy_candle.html
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Old 05-05-2012, 07:29 PM
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Only melt wax in a double boiler!
it is too easy to accidently heat wax to its flash point and then you have a burning pot of mayhem in your house that is much like burning cooking oil... not great.

Just melt it in a double boiler; i.e. a container in hot or boiling water. you can get specific wax double boilers (we were given one) for use on the stove top, but its easy to improvise. like melting chocolate is done over a double boiler also.

Regardless, i find lots of smaller candles more useful than several large ones. they can be better positioned, dotted around the place (safely!) easier and give out just the same amount of light. if you need more light, just light another.

larger candles also leave a good deal of waste wax when they are done burning, small candles are more efficient.

we only really melt down and remake the bits that are left over from larger candles to save waste.

ymmv
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Old 05-05-2012, 07:34 PM
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I wouldn't use cardboard personally unless we were already in a SHTF situation, then I'd consider it. Buying wicks at a craft store is very cheap. Melt the wax over a low temperature on your stove - I use an old saucepan that only gets used for crafty stuff, you can probably find a saucepan at a garage sale or thrift store for a couple bucks. I like not having to try and remove every last bit of wax residue before I want to cook spaghetti for dinner :D

Soup cans work, as do tuna cans if you want something shorter and squatter. Yogurt containers work too if you plan to remove them from the container before burning. You can buy molds as well, but they can be pricey.

Added: just saw the comment above, I have never had a problem burning wax in a regular saucepan, but I would put it on an unused burner while I worked if needed.
Old 05-05-2012, 07:53 PM
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I have made wicks in the past from borax and salt dissolved in water. Not sure of exact measurements but it should be available online (I'm on dial-up so can't search myself) I think it was 3-4 Tbsps borax and 2 Tbsp salt dissolved in a cup of warm water. You soak the string in this for awhile and then dry completley. Dip it in melted wax a few times and you're all good. Very cheap. I keep a copy of the exact recipe and instructions with my different candle stocks along with borax.

I made a kind of rule at my house that whenever we go to the dollar store for anything, pick up a box of emergency candles. A package of six candles, 6-hours each. 36 hours of reading light in the long 16-18 hour winters for a buck. Can't beat that with a stick.
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Old 05-05-2012, 08:05 PM
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Ugh @ the memory the words "cardboard and candles" bring up!

Bought 2 cute candles once, looked like a candle down in a grecian urn type thingey. Only problem was: they used short candles in taller containers, but they came up with the brilliant idea of putting a folded cardboard base under the candle to hold it up.

Wanna see a great flame? Get a chunk of cardboard super saturated with melted candle wax and then let flame get to it! OY ! My whole bathroom was smoked up from that thing!
Old 05-05-2012, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Technologist View Post
It would be awesome if candles users looked into LED flashlights. You can run the newer LED lights for 50-70 hours per charge on low with much more light then a candle. They can be waterproof, windproof and it's extremely rare that they will burn you or burn your house down. LED lights can also shine farther, run longer and have more output. They can be used where candles can't. Ever rode a bike or walked out of an earthquake damaged building with a candle, ever used a candle in the wind or rain?

Maybe this will help:


Quote:

"Candle Statistics

Candles cause an estimated 15,600 fires in residential structures, 150 deaths, 1,270 injuries, and $539 million in estimated direct property damage each year.

Over half (55%) of home candle fires start because the candle is too close to some combustible material.
More candle fires (38%) begin in the bedroom than in any other room.
Falling asleep is a factor in 12% of home candle fires and 26% of the associated deaths.
Half of all civilian candle fire deaths occur between Midnight and 6am.
December is the peak month for candle fires; Christmas is the peak day.
Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle fires.
The risk of a fatal candle fire appears higher when candles are used for light."

http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/ho...ev/candle.shtm


Quote:

"Paraffin Wax

Most candles are made with paraffin wax as it is less expensive than other waxes (i.e. soy, beeswax). Paraffin is made from wax that is created after refining crude oil. Hydrocarbons that are capable of generating fossil fuels are found in paraffin wax. When a paraffin wax candle is burned, all kinds of chemicals are released into the air, the most dangerous being toluene and benzene. Both of these chemicals are solvents used in the manufacturing of glue and paint. Individuals who "huff" (sniff to get high) glue and paint are achieving an impaired state due to these solvents. Benzene is also a well-known carcinogen. A chemistry expert from Durham University, Dr. Andy Beeby, says that "[Benzene] is not a substance I would ever expose myself to in the lab." Other chemicals found in paraffin based scented candles are acetaladehyde, formaldehyde and naphthalene, all of which are known to cause problems with the respiratory tract."

http://www.ehow.com/list_7647900_dan...#ixzz1u2DAE3d2
Candles also produce heat, which LEDs don't. In an emergency situation, that heat could keep you alive.

Both LED and candles have benefits and both should be considered....
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Old 05-05-2012, 08:17 PM
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I'd be suspect of any data FEMA puts out...
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Old 05-05-2012, 08:18 PM
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And more than once a non-existant cat was blamed for knocking over a candle and burning the house down.
Old 05-05-2012, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Special K View Post
Candles also produce heat, which LEDs don't. In an emergency situation, that heat could keep you alive.
100% of the energy from an LED light can be used as heat while it's very hard to tap the majority of heat off of a candle.

All light energy gets converted to heat because of absorption. If a light wave of a given frequency strikes a material with electrons having the same vibrational frequencies, then those electrons will absorb the energy of the light wave and transform it into vibrational motion. During its vibration, the electrons interact with neighboring atoms in such a manner as to convert its vibrational energy into thermal energy. Subsequently, the light wave with that given frequency is absorbed by the object, never again to be released in the form of light. So the selective absorption of light by a particular material occurs because the selected frequency of the light wave matches the frequency at which electrons in the atoms of that material vibrate. Since different atoms and molecules have different natural frequencies of vibration, they will selectively absorb different frequencies of visible light.

Turn your LED light on High and block the light with something that blocks all of the light or even your hand. All energy will be converted to heat and if held properly will heat your hands up, thus transferring that heat energy to your body.

A single Li-ion 18650 cell Flashlight will release about 10 Watt Hours of energy and can be converted to 34.1 BTU of heat. That same energy could raise 1 pound of water 34.1 Degrees Fahrenheit. Meaning they also make a great hand warmer in an emergency if your light can dump the energy quickly enough. The new 18650 1000 Lumen CREE XM-L T6 LED lights are perfect for this.

BTW: I invented something almost identical to this vacuum glove 25 years ago but mine heated and or cooled the body.

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/15.03/bemore.html

http://smarteconomy.typepad.com/smar...ld_cup__1.html
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Old 05-05-2012, 09:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GENT View Post
Only melt wax in a double boiler!
it is too easy to accidently heat wax to its flash point and then you have a burning pot of mayhem in your house that is much like burning cooking oil... not great.

Just melt it in a double boiler; i.e. a container in hot or boiling water. you can get specific wax double boilers (we were given one) for use on the stove top, but its easy to improvise. like melting chocolate is done over a double boiler also.
I agree with this. My family used to be heavily into candle making, and after a few 'accidents' we always used the simple tactic of putting the wax in an old coffee can, putting the can in a large pot of boiling water, and letting it melt. It was much safer, and any wax that somehow got out of the can through too vigorous stirring or that trickled down the side while wax was being poured into a mold would wind up in the water instead of on a possibly igniting burner.

One of the problems with using normal string (or, I suppose, cardboard) as a wick is that it burns fast. You want a slow flame to maximize the amount of light you get out of the candle. Mix 4 tablespoons of borax and 2 tablespoons of salt in 1 1/2 cups of warm water, put the string in it and let it soak for 15-20 minutes, then take it out and hang it up to dry for 5 days. After that, dip the wick into molten wax several times and coat it completely, then let the wax harden fully before using it in a mold to make a new candle...
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