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Old 03-07-2012, 08:19 AM
captaingreg captaingreg is offline
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Default going to build a smoke house from cinder blocks



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heres the plan sort of build a house out of some blocks and connect a seperate pit with like 10-12inch terra cotta pipe.....ideas ,criticisms,plans? going to have to be a hot house due to lack of freezing temps here i think.....thanks
Old 03-08-2012, 11:41 AM
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If the house is big enough then why not dig a pit in the floor.
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Old 03-08-2012, 06:49 PM
rextex rextex is offline
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The smokehouse I used as a boy had the ceramic tile pipe leading from the fire to inside the house. It was about 10 feet from the house and down the side of a hill so the draft would take the smoke to it. The temperature stayed pretty cool as the smoke cooled pretty well before going into the house. We used a mixture of wood-hickory, ash and apple. Our house was oakwood rough cut planks and was over 100 years old way back then. The finished product was hard to beat!
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Old 03-08-2012, 08:21 PM
Pangea Pangea is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2muchstuff View Post
If the house is big enough then why not dig a pit in the floor.
Because a real smokehouse uses cool smoke and a remote fire box. If the pit was in the smokehouse, you'd have to go into the smoke to keep the pit going and the heat would exceed the recommended 160-170 degrees.
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Old 03-09-2012, 04:57 PM
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On season 2 of The Colony they built an awesome one out of plywood that almost lasted 24 hours. I have been unsuccessful in convincing the Mr to build me one like that.

My uncle had one like Rextex described, and the box to put the food in was a big old refrigerator with the wire racks in it that the pipe with the smoke came up into at the bottom. There weren't any hills really but seems like I remember it having a bit of a slope coming from the firebox up to the fridge.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:09 PM
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great website

http://cowgirlscountry.blogspot.com/...mokehouse.html

I took it one step further and built it inside a block building



http://thehomesteadingboards.com/201...ed-greenhouse/

good luck!
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:24 AM
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The temp control is going to be your biggest challenge. For the best smoking you want to be around 120F to 150F. Also if you get too hot, your meat will start dripping fat and you don't want that. For cold weather add a burner on the bottom to increase your heat a little. For hot weather add some extra venting that you can adjust as you need it. If you want the luxury, add a small fan to move the smoke around. This eliminates dead spots that every smokehouse has, where you don't get enough smoke to the product.

333
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:32 AM
Greatnorthern Greatnorthern is offline
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My grandfather smoked meat had a farm with beef, pigs, chickens, maple sugar and lots of garden. He did all smoking in what looked like an old time outhouse that they would move out by the back door after butchering a pig. A little pail was the fire pit and they put applewood and corncob in it to make the smoke.
He was a real old time farmer.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:34 AM
MattB4 MattB4 is offline
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The temp control is going to be your biggest challenge. For the best smoking you want to be around 120F to 150F. ...
Too hot for cold smoking (long term preservation). You do not want to exceed 90F, ideally the temperature from 80F to 85F is used because at 90F the fat starts to liquefy and spoilage can result.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:41 AM
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I live on the coastal area of northern Maine where the water table is high so digging is out, what I did was build my Little smokehouse (4'x4') up on the side of my raised septic leachfield mound and dropped a insulated stainless steel Chimney liner pipe (8') from under the edge of the smokehouse to a fire box built out of a old barrel, I can put a rack inside the firebox with a pan filled with Fruit tree and grape vine trimmings I grind with my Little wood chipper and smoke away. A guy closer to town used an old refrigerator and made one, it looked o.k. but I noticed the paint peeling inside from the heat and I got to thinking I wouldn't want any "Extra" Flavoring in my meat or fish.. I think what your doing sounds right on track. Just make sure your well enough away from anything else that can catch on fire... Been There, done that.
Old 03-11-2012, 11:13 AM
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I haven't had any trouble with the fat at the 120-150 range Matt. Any higher and it would run, different results from different fats as well. The only thing I would cold smoke under 85 would be cheese. Meats at this low temp wouldn't absorb the smoke very well and it would take forever to get good penetration. For long term, I assume your using a very low fat content meat and doing a dehydration at the same time, really a different type of process. Not sure what CaptainGreg is using his for.

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Old 03-11-2012, 11:31 AM
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I haven't had any trouble with the fat at the 120-150 range Matt. Any higher and it would run, different results from different fats as well. The only thing I would cold smoke under 85 would be cheese. Meats at this low temp wouldn't absorb the smoke very well and it would take forever to get good penetration. For long term, I assume your using a very low fat content meat and doing a dehydration at the same time, really a different type of process. Not sure what CaptainGreg is using his for.

333
The advice is for cold smoking which is more a form of controlled dehydration than it is cooking. Your method is what is known as hot smoking. It works great for tasty foods but does not provide long term preservation. Most smoked foods today are hot smoked. The information on smoking is from The Joy of Cooking Cookbook first printed in 1931, my edition is copyrighted from 1969
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:14 PM
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I uploaded our smoker construction if you want to see our method

http://thehomesteadingboards.com/
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:45 PM
becky3086 becky3086 is offline
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I have to agree with tripletrey. You are not hot smoking unless you are cooking the meat and 120-150 is not hot smoking as I understand it.
However, I think making a smokehouse from blocks would work just fine. A separate pit for the fire would work great.
Also keep in mind that our ancestors did not have these digital thermometers and did not keep track of temperature. They smoked it for a certain amount of days and it normally worked.
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Old 03-16-2012, 12:45 AM
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Most commercial dehydrators operate around 150 F, so my guess is you're cooking it. Just not cooking it to the point like if you threw it on a grill, which is why it takes longer. If you smoke at 150, then that makes from my understanding 3 types of smoking.

First you have cold smoking. This is how meat is cured for longer term preservation. if I understand the process right, you brine the meat in a cure or rub the outside down, and then you cold smoke it. There's just enough heat to kill off any bad stuff in the outer portion of the meat, and then the smoke interacts with the cure, creating basically a shell through which the bad stuff has a harder time getting in through, allowing the meat to last longer without refrigeration. This meat is still technically raw and will need to be cooked like you just picked it up from the butcher shop when you use it.

Hot smoking is the same kind of process but is done at a bit higher temp, but not as high as you normally would cook something. Basically what's being done is part curing/part dehydrating. However, something in the process changes the meat to the point it will not last as long as cold smoked/cured meats.

Then you have what I call grill smoking. This is what many of us do, and man does it taste soooo good. you cook at a lower temperature than you would conventionally but for a longer amount of time so that the internal temp of the meat reaches proper temp, and you add/use wood to impart a particular flavor on said meat. Low and slow is the key, but usually the lowest I've gone was ribs and brisket, and that was 225. Granted I have only really done pork loins, turkeys(you'll never complain of a dry smoked turkey unless they screw it up), ribs, and briskets. I'll be honest, this is called smoking and a big chunk of folks will think of this when you first say smoked meats,so I include it, but I don't think of it as a traditional smoking like the hot or cold smoking. This meat is meant for immediate consumption or at least within a couple of days. It is cooked to be the juiciest possible, not to dry it or preserve it, therefore it won't last any considerable length of time.

So in a sense both sides are right. Cold smoking is colder than hot smoking, but hot smoking is still colder than grill smoking. So from a grill smoking standpoint, both cold and hot smoking are 'cold smoking'.
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