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Old 02-08-2012, 09:00 PM
Rex Rex is offline
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Default Powdered Bleach?



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Liquid bleach is the best universal cleaner I know of. Problem is, it doesn't last long. Goes bad in a year or two in the plastic bottles.

I've seen powdered bleach advertised for swimming pool uses, and I was wondering how long the shelf life is on that stuff. Bound to be longer than liquid.

Also, I do long-term food storage with mylar bags and oxygen absorbers, so if I sealed powdered bleach in vacuum packed bags, how long would it last?

It would be nice to be able to open a sealed bag in 10-15 years and mix some bleach for disinfecting.

Anyone have any experience with this? Any ideas?

Thanks.
Old 02-08-2012, 09:06 PM
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search option ..... "calcium hypochlorite"...... "pool shock" ..... "treat water" ..... "bleach" ......
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Old 02-08-2012, 10:00 PM
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Illini Warrior is right on. Powder is way cheaper and more stable. Spill it on your DRY clothes and NO PROBLEM! Make sure you get straight Pool Shock with no clarifiers or other additives!!
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Old 02-08-2012, 11:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex View Post
Also, I do long-term food storage with mylar bags and oxygen absorbers, so if I sealed powdered bleach in vacuum packed bags, how long would it last?

I do not think you want to store Calcium Hypochlorite (if that is what you mean by "powdered bleach") in Mylar bags or any other metallic or metal containers. Heavy plastic bottles would be my guess. Glass Mason jars with plastic lids if you're not worried about breakage.
Old 02-09-2012, 07:02 AM
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[QUOTE=charlindabob;3754853]I do not think you want to store Calcium Hypochlorite (if that is what you mean by "powdered bleach") in Mylar bags or any other metallic or metal containers. Heavy plastic bottles would be my guess. Glass Mason jars with plastic lids if you're not worried about breakage.[/QUOTE]



Never ever in glass jars ..... definitely no metal lids .... this stuff is dynamite under the wrong conditions ..... the prime wrong condition is having it loose in your house ..... period ......
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Old 02-09-2012, 07:38 AM
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I store Calcium Hypochlorite in its original plastic bag (pool shock) inside of a 5 gallon bucket with all my long term filter parts and instructions. For short term ( in BOB) I use a small glass jar with a plastic lid along with a jar of Polar Pure and hand filter.

Its my understanding as long as the Calcium Hypochlorite is dry and sealed it will out live me.
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Old 02-09-2012, 09:49 AM
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[quote=Illini Warrior;3755416]
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlindabob View Post
I do not think you want to store Calcium Hypochlorite (if that is what you mean by "powdered bleach") in Mylar bags or any other metallic or metal containers. Heavy plastic bottles would be my guess. Glass Mason jars with plastic lids if you're not worried about breakage.[/QUOTE]



Never ever in glass jars ..... definitely no metal lids .... this stuff is dynamite under the wrong conditions ..... the prime wrong condition is having it loose in your house ..... period ......
Have to ask. What happens? Explosion? Gas vapors? What?
Old 02-09-2012, 07:25 PM
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Alright! thanks for the replies.

So, I'll be looking for Pool Shock with no clarifiers or other additives. Should be 'Calcium Hypochlorite,' right?

I've seen the small bags of pool shock for about $7-8. As I understand it, that small bag will treat a volume of hundreds or thousands of gallons...haven't read the labels in detail.

So one of those bags, sealed and dry, should last indefinitely. Then when opened, treat carefully with no metal contact, care with glass. Store in a ventilated place.

That's what I've pieced together from the above. Let me know if I'm off the mark.

Bleach really is amazing, and it would be nice to be able to mix it up as needed in the years ahead.

Thanks again.

Just did a search...article here on Calcium Hypochlorite:

http://readynutrition.com/resources/...ater_19062010/
Old 02-12-2012, 11:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ash1978 View Post
Have to ask. What happens? Explosion? Gas vapors? What?
In the wrong conditions, it can be an inhalation hazard. If not stored properly and accidentally combined with other materials, it could form a hazardous g ass. It is also an oxidizer.

A long time ago, in another lifetime, had a bottle of Calcium Hypochlorite stored in one of those .mil aluminum med chests, along with a whole bunch of other medic stuff that I was inventorying prior to deployment.

Well, whoever had previously stored it did not seal it tight enough. The entire inside of the med chest and anything metallic was severely rusted, and all of the paper/gauzes/band aids were brittle to the touch, pretty much toast.

They were also available in individual glass ampules that looked like this:
Old 03-16-2012, 05:57 PM
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I have another question about this.

I finally found some decent calcium hypochlorite today, at a pool supply place. Bought a couple of 1-lb bags. It is 73% calcium hypochlorite, 27% inert. No additives mentioned. The 73% was the most potent I could find. At least it doesn't have additives. All the others I looked at did.

So now I've been looking on the web and can't find info on how to mix it to get it to the strength of Clorox. I guess I'd need to know the parts per million of Clorox, and then how to step the hypochlorite down to that ppm rating.

It'll probably be a system where I mix a teaspoon of HC with a gallon of water, dissolve completely, and then dilute a cup of that mixture in x gallons of additional water.

Has anyone ever done this? If so, I'd appreciate the information on how to go about it.

Mainly we're looking at needing bleach for general household uses in the future. Hand washing during flu outbreaks, general sanitizing and such. Need to step this stuff down somehow. Made my throat constrict today just walking up to the shelf where it was sitting out. Dude in the store had bad black rings around his eyes, looked sick. Could be exposure to this stuff all day long.

Anyway, any advice or links would be appreciated.
Old 03-16-2012, 06:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex View Post
I have another question about this.

I finally found some decent calcium hypochlorite today, at a pool supply place. Bought a couple of 1-lb bags. It is 73% calcium hypochlorite, 27% inert. No additives mentioned. The 73% was the most potent I could find. At least it doesn't have additives. All the others I looked at did.

So now I've been looking on the web and can't find info on how to mix it to get it to the strength of Clorox. I guess I'd need to know the parts per million of Clorox, and then how to step the hypochlorite down to that ppm rating.

It'll probably be a system where I mix a teaspoon of HC with a gallon of water, dissolve completely, and then dilute a cup of that mixture in x gallons of additional water.

Has anyone ever done this? If so, I'd appreciate the information on how to go about it.

Mainly we're looking at needing bleach for general household uses in the future. Hand washing during flu outbreaks, general sanitizing and such. Need to step this stuff down somehow. Made my throat constrict today just walking up to the shelf where it was sitting out. Dude in the store had bad black rings around his eyes, looked sick. Could be exposure to this stuff all day long.

Anyway, any advice or links would be appreciated.
The .gov seems to have taken their head out of their ass for a minute to **** out something useful. Pay close attention to the numbers and ratios.

Quote:
Originally Posted by http://water.epa.gov/drink/emerprep/emergencydisinfection.cfm

You can use granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water.


Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately ounce) for each two gallons of water, or 5 milliliters (approximately 7 grams) per 7.5 liters of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter, since the calcium hypochlorite has available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water or (approximately liter to 50 liters of water) to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the disinfected water by pouring it back and forth from one clean container to another.
Old 03-17-2012, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TDFbound View Post
The .gov seems to have taken their head out of their ass for a minute to **** out something useful. Pay close attention to the numbers and ratios.
Imagine how much they are going to charge us for THAT procedure! It's not going to be free!

Thanks for the post!
Old 03-20-2012, 07:16 PM
Rex Rex is offline
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Okay, I went to the .gov site and then one other. Good information.

Treating water for drinking is just one of the applications for the bleach we'll be making. I need to come up with a formula for mixing the bleach (how much calcium hypochlorite + water to equal the strength of household bleach). From there we can use it for general sanitizing, treating drinking water and so on.

I found this on a British website: "One gram of 65% pool chlorine powder, dissolved in 1 liter of water, would provide a FAC (Free Available Chlorine) level of 0.47 grams per liter. The same amount of household bleach dissolved in the same amount of water would provide a FAC level of 0.04 grams per liter."

I refreshed my knowledge of measurements:
  • One gallon = 16 cups
  • One cup = 16 tablespoons, or 48 teaspoons

And now it's just a matter of mixing the right amount of powder with the right amount of water to end up with "household bleach."

Rough numbers here, rounded for ease. Since the powder is about 10 times stronger than the liquid bleach, I reckon 1 cup of powder mixed with 100 cups of water would yield 10 cups of household bleach. Stepping it down, that would be 1/2 cup for 50 cups, 1/4 cup for 25 cups, and finally 1/8 cup (2 tablespoons) of powder for 12 cups of water. That's getting close to gallon size. That 2 tbsps to 12 cups would be about the strength of liquid household bleach, right?

Just trying to visualize this before I do the mixing. Anyone see something that I don't? The figures are ballpark, but I think they're about right.

EDIT: The British excerpt shows a mixed bleach that's 11-12 times stronger than household bleach, and that's with 65% Calcium Hypochlorite. Ours is 73%. So, those 2 tablespoons mixed with 14-15 cups of water should be pretty close to the level of household bleach.
Old 03-21-2012, 04:31 PM
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Ditto on the EPA publication. It has great info on using this. Here's a video that shows how to do it as well:

http://youtu.be/TSBOdFr9yfs
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