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Old 02-07-2012, 09:43 PM
northslope northslope is offline
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Default What is the best wood burning stove?



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1. How much better are the new high efficiency stoves? I have a big Woodsman wood burning stove with no blower. (about 36 inches wide) Will a new high efficiency stove serve me much better...especially in an emergency?

2. If I go with a new stove, what is the best one (that is not ridiculously priced). I would like something that will take a BIG log, is efficient and that I could use for heating water/food in a pinch.
Old 02-07-2012, 10:14 PM
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Everyone wants something different from their stove.

Every manufacturer calculates 'efficiency' differently.

We use a Vogelzang two-barrel stove. It's opening is 12"X10". I am able to feed it most stuff without need to split firewood. So I do not split wood.

It takes up to 34" wood.

The upper barrel actually doubles it's heat output. Which is rated at 200kBtu.

It draws away so much of the heat from the fire into the room that the stove-pipe is cool enough to touch most of the time. [not to hold your hand there, it would get burned, but to lay your hand on it and remove].

Our stove's upper barrel has 50' of 5/8' copper-tubing coils inside it, which heats water, which flows through our radiant floor system. By heating our floors, it spreads much of it's heat equally through-out our home.

Is it EPA rated? No.

Are we very happy with it? Yes.

We have used ti for six years, and we expect to use it for many more years.

Also it costs less than $200.

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Old 02-07-2012, 10:25 PM
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If your current one has fire brick and is airtight I would spend the money on other preps. If it a cast iron franklin I look for something else. All the new stuff I have seen has a catalitic praverter just something to plug up. I am considering adding a rocket stove with the firebox outside. They say I'll burn 1/4 the wood.
http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp
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Old 02-07-2012, 10:26 PM
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How about this one:

http://biolitestove.com/CampStove.html
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Old 02-07-2012, 11:18 PM
LIBERTYCHICKEN LIBERTYCHICKEN is offline
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How the hell does that thing create electric

I Think the OP wants a stove for heat

I like the potbelly modells their EZ to cook on

Hey frostbeekeper have you ever thought about welding tubeing into the second or so barrel for a better heat transfer I have seen A few people have done this and swear by it
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Old 02-07-2012, 11:57 PM
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In Canada there is an older stove called a Woodchief. It is airtight with a huge woodbox
and a flipup lid that allows you to cook directly on the firebox. They are about $200 and they
are excellent....
Old 02-08-2012, 12:59 AM
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Harbor freight sells a very simple log stove that will work just fine.
The trick with the stove is how it is set up to begin with .
It hss been my expirence 50 years or so ,that having apair of L's in the stove pipe makes the stove burn more effecient. the damper needs to be about 3 feet up the pipe from the stove.
People tend to go cheap and run one strait pipe, but it only causes the air to be drawn more quickly into the stove and much harder to control. I get a warm house using a quarter of the fuel during the winter,compared to my neighbors . and the stove pipe is not so hot to the touch passing through the celling, even though the stove is regestering over 600 degrees.
If the stove pipe is too hot to touch near the celling, the system is set up wrong.
Set up this way the pipe needs to be sheet metal screwed for security and disassembly and reasembly for cleaning in the spring. Hard woods are best , I mix them as I go.
You can cook on the top of a log stove just fine , and they are large enough that the wood can be generous in size.
Split wood is best for starting, but unsplit logs roughly 6" in diameter, will burn well once the stove is going.
Great thing about log stoves is you can stoke them for the night cut down the air in and dampen it with in reason, and it will cook all nite.
We keep a tea kettle of water on it all the time ,keeping the moisture up especially during the winter months when the air tends to dry out from the freezing tempretures out side.
The stove I use right now is an antique cook stove, I rebilt . the fire box is about the size of a loaf of bread and the oven is just big enough for a 20 lb turkey.
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIBERTYCHICKEN View Post
... Hey frostbeekeper have you ever thought about welding tubeing into the second or so barrel for a better heat transfer I have seen A few people have done this and swear by it
You could do that.

I judge how efficient the heat-transfer is by how much heat is removed before it gets to the stove-pipe.

Two steel drums has a lot of surface area, and they are very good at radiating heat into the room.

By also heating water for me, I get a lot more heat from the fire. Into a thermal-bank down stairs and flowing through the floors.

Our stove drafts real good. However if we sucked much more heat from the exhaust then drafting might become as issue. You can not suck 100% of the heat away and still expect it to draft for you.

Old 02-08-2012, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIBERTYCHICKEN View Post
How the hell does that thing create electric

I Think the OP wants a stove for heat

I like the potbelly modells their EZ to cook on

Hey frostbeekeper have you ever thought about welding tubeing into the second or so barrel for a better heat transfer I have seen A few people have done this and swear by it
I had two 30 gal drums set up like this in my 28x32ft garage when i lived in the city and had a fan behind the top drum and it would just about cook us out of the garage in the winter .
Old 02-08-2012, 07:55 PM
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I'm very partial towards soapstone wood stoves. Beautiful and efficient, they hold heat for hours longer than steel or cast iron.

http://www.woodstove.com/fireview
Old 02-08-2012, 08:04 PM
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Thats a beautiful thing
Our stove drafts real good. However if we sucked much more heat from the exhaust then drafting might become as issue. You can not suck 100% of the heat away and still expect it to draft for you. -
Very true, but even in todays hightech boilers their only getting about 96% efficency and thats no wood stove
most drafting problems are chimney issues

arleigh sounds like you your self have drafting problems / sounds like you need to adjust your primary air and/or a draft regulator
Old 02-08-2012, 08:05 PM
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I second the soap stone stoves. They are excellent at holding more heat (see below)...

The things that going to add the most efficiency are going to be thermal mass, insulation and the space you're heating. If you can get thermal mass around your stove (we pile bricks around ours), it is going to store more heat and release it slowly, giving you more bang for your buck, and of course insulation slows heat loss.

The last one -- space you're heating -- can be difficult to adjust if you're already in a large house, but it might be possible to close off parts of the house in winter that are not in use and use them for cold storage. It's common sense that the less space you're heating, the less fuel you'll need.

Sorry, I know this doesn't address the OP directly, but my experience is that any reasonably efficient stove will do well if these other issues are covered.
Old 02-08-2012, 08:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlgoRhythms View Post
I'm very partial towards soapstone wood stoves. Beautiful and efficient, they hold heat for hours longer than steel or cast iron.

http://www.woodstove.com/fireview
So do not view efficiency in terms of fuel to heat conversion.

But instead you see efficiency in terms of how long a system holds the heat. Have you considered a thermal bank?
Old 02-08-2012, 08:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
So do not view efficiency in terms of fuel to heat conversion.

But instead you see efficiency in terms of how long a system holds the heat. Have you considered a thermal bank?
Yes, I guess that's what I think, because practically speaking, the fuel to heat conversion is greatly affected by the moisture content of the wood I burn.

It's rare that I have completely dry wood as the oak in my neck of the woods takes two or more seasons to completely dry.

So I care more about how long the system holds heat once I get it up to temperature.
Old 02-08-2012, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlgoRhythms View Post
Yes, I guess that's what I think, because practically speaking, the fuel to heat conversion is greatly affected by the moisture content of the wood I burn.

It's rare that I have completely dry wood as the oak in my neck of the woods takes two or more seasons to completely dry.

So I care more about how long the system holds heat once I get it up to temperature.
Okay.

I heat water, the water flows through a thermal bank, where the heat is stored. From that thermal bank the water can also flow through my radiant floor system.
Old 02-08-2012, 08:36 PM
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Quote:
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Okay.

I heat water, the water flows through a thermal bank, where the heat is stored. From that thermal bank the water can also flow through my radiant floor system.
Very Nice! My setup isn't any near as sophisticated as that.

Large stove in basement with vent/fan registers cut into ceiling for warm air to rise upstairs. Large circulating fan in basement to distribute warm air evenly.

Cold air return is stairwell from living space to basement.

Simple but quite effective.
Old 02-08-2012, 08:47 PM
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Default Woodstove

I have a country woodstove I bought almost 8 years ago used w/ 3 pieces of unused triple wall and the stove pipe for $350

My gas bill last month was $15.96, I have gas heat and gas water

My country wood stove has a glass front door, (which I highly recommend), and is EPA Tested and Oregon approved, it is a 1992 model and I have looked at 2006/7 models and there is no difference.

Best thing I ever did was install that woodstove

I got home to tonight at 5:30 and got up on roof and cleaned it

Last summer I bought a Fisher woodstove, the baby fisher, for a $100
A $4 can of high temp paint and it looks brand new, sits out in my garage, I know I could double or triple my money but I cant part with it!

I live in the Pacific NW at 2800 foot level and unless the low is in the 20's I wont even light it, after it warms up and I stoked it down to a flame the size of your thumb I have to crack the garage door all night or I wake up to 78 degrees.

And many times I have come home after work and with the heater off all day it will be 58 degrees inside my house and 10 outside. I lite the woodstove, leave the door cracked open and about an hour later you can take you coat off and by bedtime it is 70 or higher. 1465 square foot house
Old 02-08-2012, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlgoRhythms View Post
...
It's rare that I have completely dry wood as the oak in my neck of the woods takes two or more seasons to completely dry.

...
Cut your trees down before the end of Winter before the sap begins to rise for putting on leaves. If you cut in Summer or Fall the trees have a great deal of moisture in them. They reduce this naturally in Winter to reduce freeze damage. If you cut and split the wood like this it will dry over Summer and burn great in when the cool season comes.
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Old 02-08-2012, 09:51 PM
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Tagging in because I plan to buy one soon.
__________________
tailwinds...

Disclaimer: The information I provide is my unaffiliated opinion and not reliable as financial advice. Past performance guarantees SHTF.
Old 02-08-2012, 10:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattB4 View Post
Cut your trees down before the end of Winter before the sap begins to rise for putting on leaves. If you cut in Summer or Fall the trees have a great deal of moisture in them. They reduce this naturally in Winter to reduce freeze damage. If you cut and split the wood like this it will dry over Summer and burn great in when the cool season comes.

Thanks for that excellent tip. Unfortunately I usually have to purchase my oak. I try to keep two seasons worth of fuel but don't always succeed.

This winter, being unusually mild, I will be ahead of the curve so next winter's wood will have two years of seasoning.

But I will remember to ask for oak that was cut in the winter.
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