Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Farming, Gardening & Homesteading
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Farming, Gardening & Homesteading Country lifestyle, homesteading and living off the grid.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-01-2012, 10:43 PM
dac dac is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 694
Thanks: 503
Thanked 510 Times in 281 Posts
Default Best Areas in the US to live self sufficiently



Advertise Here

Since about 5th or 6th grade when I read ďMy Side of the MountainĒ Iíve always wanted to live self sufficiently in a less populated area. (Not in a hollowed out side of a tree) Iíve got about 2 and a half years of college left and Iíve started looking for an area to move to and set up my own homestead. Now What Iím looking for is an area of the US with a low population/density, cheap land and lots of woods to hunt. Right now Iím really looking into northern Maine because all the factors seem right, Iím hopefully heading up there this summer or early next fall to check it out. Thereís a few other areas IĎm looking at but I want some more Ideas on what areas to check out. So if anyone knows any areas of the US you think I should check out please post it up.

Thank you in advance
dac

P.S. before anyone asked me If I know how hard it is I know. I grew up hunting and fishing and gardening and doing most of the fixes around the house(My dad is dead so Iím the ďmanĒ of the house) The only thing that would be really new to me would be any live stock.
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to dac For This Useful Post:
Old 01-02-2012, 01:26 AM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 51
Posts: 50,603
Thanks: 91,915
Thanked 104,664 Times in 33,541 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

My criteria would include plenty of available water, and a long enough growing season that you can direct sow your crops. Starting plants indoors and transplanting them is fine for a small kitchen garden, but it would be a huge undertaking in a garden large enough to feed your family.
The Following User Says Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 01-02-2012, 08:57 AM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 16,433
Thanks: 18,727
Thanked 22,868 Times in 9,287 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Water: a great deal of the USA is drought-prone. Year after year they suffer from droughts. Also a large portion of the US population's water supply is municipal controlled; meaning if there is any interruption in the workings of the government that water supply system will stop. Growing up farming, I saw how important water is to producing food. There is only a minority of areas in the world that honestly have plenty of water and never have droughts.

Population density: Granted during SHTF scenarios waves of sheeple may flood across an area searching to better places to be; but urbanites are not trained to survive in rural environments. Overall the 'best' regions are rural where you can have larger spreads of land to yourself.

Growing season gets shorter as you move Northward. Even in Canada they have long enough growing season to be self-sufficient. So the only places in the US that may lack a long growing season is Northern Alaska [up into the Arctic Circle].

The 'trick' is to bug-out before SHTF.

Historically you can examine any / all of the accounts of early settlers to North America. In every case, they had gardening tools and seed. In every case the first few years they starved and died. It takes 5 years of gardening in an area to finally figure out how to feed yourself from your garden.
__________________
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to ForestBeekeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 01-02-2012, 09:16 AM
letsgetreal letsgetreal is offline
Really?
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 16,130
Thanks: 6,475
Thanked 10,226 Times in 4,917 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster Top Poster 
Total Awards: 2
Default

IMO, whatever youre doing now, is what you'll be doing PSHTF. AT this point , you're where you are, what if you had a SHTF there? Are you prepared for that? You have more things to worry about than where to BO to. Folks have survived in Easten KY for hundreds of years, but so have they down in Florida, up North and out West.

The thing is, for when it does NOT SHTF, how are going to live? Seems to me you need to live where your work is, your income. If you're independantly wealthy, then it comes down to what do want to be doing? If you want to be on a self sustaining farm, then you need to get on with it. If you need experience in livestock, you need to get on with it. They take at least 5 yrs to get the hang of getting them to thrive. You need to get all the equipment and stuff. right now, you should be reading and practicing. Get with folks who's already doing it and learn from them.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to letsgetreal For This Useful Post:
Old 01-02-2012, 11:14 AM
methemom's Avatar
methemom methemom is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: northern mi
Posts: 3,592
Thanks: 5,569
Thanked 3,453 Times in 1,670 Posts
Default

To search a locale, try to go to county websites and search how much annual precipitation, how much land is in farm land, what the sustaining industries are, local population and so much more. almost every county in the usa has a list of statistics gleaned from the last census which will tell you much about the general area. You have already narrowed down your choices to some extent. By reading about the areas of interest first you can zero in on the most likely choices. Then plan a trip to visit those areas and talk to people there, live there for a while if you can, subscribe to local news, etc etc... in your last school years you can have a potential location and even potential
work lined up. We did a version of this search to determine which locations were most desirable for retirement. PM me if you want to talk further about your search!
best wishes
The Following User Says Thank You to methemom For This Useful Post:
Old 01-02-2012, 11:31 AM
catmando catmando is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3,245
Thanks: 7
Thanked 3,256 Times in 1,483 Posts
Default

the best place to live in a SHTF world is your mommas basement.. unless your not already there...lol
The Following User Says Thank You to catmando For This Useful Post:
Old 01-02-2012, 11:40 AM
REM's Avatar
REM REM is offline
Getting There!
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: East Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 8,969
Thanks: 15,264
Thanked 12,218 Times in 5,072 Posts
Default

It never rains in...?

http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...ghlight=garden

This is awesome!!
Old 01-04-2012, 05:21 PM
high peaks man high peaks man is offline
3/11 ACR Scout
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 481
Thanks: 757
Thanked 723 Times in 285 Posts
Default

Quote:
dac;3607448] Now What I’m looking for is an area of the US with a low population/density, cheap land and lots of woods to hunt. Right now I’m really looking into northern Maine because all the factors seem right, I’m hopefully heading up there this summer or early next fall to check it out.
Thank you in advance

Have you considered how you would support
yourself/make money in Maine?

You will need some money to survive here.

It can be difficult for people who have lived here all their
lives to eek out a living , we are at the end of the economic pipeline.

Maybe you will bring a usable profession or skilled trade in demand ?

I usually tell people to bring their own money if they want to live here.

N. Maine especially is whole different world, nice but not much industry or business .
The Following User Says Thank You to high peaks man For This Useful Post:
Old 01-04-2012, 06:10 PM
dac dac is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 694
Thanks: 503
Thanked 510 Times in 281 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by high peaks man View Post
Have you considered how you would support
yourself/make money in Maine?

You will need some money to survive here.

It can be difficult for people who have lived here all their
lives to eek out a living , we are at the end of the economic pipeline.

Maybe you will bring a usable profession or skilled trade in demand ?

I usually tell people to bring their own money if they want to live here.

N. Maine especially is whole different world, nice but not much industry or business .
right now I'm in college for a criminal justice degree. I'm finishing up that in may and switching to a different major(probably education) for my bachelors. I know some carpentry and I'm either taking a class in welding or electrical this spring.
The Following User Says Thank You to dac For This Useful Post:
Old 01-04-2012, 07:05 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 16,433
Thanks: 18,727
Thanked 22,868 Times in 9,287 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dac View Post
right now I'm in college for a criminal justice degree. I'm finishing up that in may and switching to a different major(probably education) for my bachelors. I know some carpentry and I'm either taking a class in welding or electrical this spring.
We always need Law Enforcement.



The state recently re-consolidated school districts. Which caused some school districts to vanish. The reasoning was that we had over 70 administrators who were all making over $100k. Schools are still on shaky ground with their budgets. One district near me just announced a week ago that they will be laying off more teachers and programs.

I have a friend who was a middle-school teacher in NJ for over 10-years. She moved up here to bug-out but has not been able to find any full-time employment. She has a couple part-time tutoring gigs. But is reduced to mostly baby-sitting gigs.



Maine is un-like most other places I have lived. Nearly every guy here is a carpenter AND plumber AND electrician AND welder.

They really do not require licensed contractors for much of anything. If you grew up doing 'a little carpentry and plumbing and electrical' then you can likely already doing those skills in a part-time capacity.

I have been in other places where nobody could touch those things without a state contractor's license.

The same goes for welders.

__________________
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ForestBeekeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 01-04-2012, 10:32 PM
ChristiM's Avatar
ChristiM ChristiM is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: NE Mississippi
Age: 40
Posts: 214
Thanks: 656
Thanked 287 Times in 127 Posts
Default

I live in Mississippi and even though I hated it as a child? I love it now. We live in a smaller town (only 27 thousand, give or take) with lots of land available that includes plenty of trees. We own 73 acres that we garden, hunt & raise animals on. The town I live doesn't have much serious issues (gangs, murder, rapists, etc...) with plenty of woods to hunt. We also have a great growing season (as long as you can handle the humidity & the heat). I know.. go ahead with the jokes. lol
We can always use law enforcement but MS needs new teachers, current teachers that are open minded also.
Old 01-05-2012, 11:08 AM
high peaks man high peaks man is offline
3/11 ACR Scout
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 481
Thanks: 757
Thanked 723 Times in 285 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dac View Post
right now I'm in college for a criminal justice degree. I'm finishing up that in may and switching to a different major(probably education) for my bachelors. I know some carpentry and I'm either taking a class in welding or electrical this spring.
In the last couple years building projects/new homes have been minimal in rural areas here. There are a glut of used homes on the market everywhere.
Some of the built up areas, Portland-Bangor have seen some commercial/residential development.
But, on the whole, not seeing many if any help wanted ads statewide for skilled trades people.

If the rest of the country's economy starts growing, give us a few years to catch up.
Old 01-05-2012, 12:40 PM
dac dac is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 694
Thanks: 503
Thanked 510 Times in 281 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
We always need Law Enforcement.



The state recently re-consolidated school districts. Which caused some school districts to vanish. The reasoning was that we had over 70 administrators who were all making over $100k. Schools are still on shaky ground with their budgets. One district near me just announced a week ago that they will be laying off more teachers and programs.

I have a friend who was a middle-school teacher in NJ for over 10-years. She moved up here to bug-out but has not been able to find any full-time employment. She has a couple part-time tutoring gigs. But is reduced to mostly baby-sitting gigs.



Maine is un-like most other places I have lived. Nearly every guy here is a carpenter AND plumber AND electrician AND welder.

They really do not require licensed contractors for much of anything. If you grew up doing 'a little carpentry and plumbing and electrical' then you can likely already doing those skills in a part-time capacity.

I have been in other places where nobody could touch those things without a state contractor's license.

The same goes for welders.

the classes I'm taking are more of basic stuff you can do at home kind of stuff. I would still need to learn way more stuff then I already know to use it as a career.

I'm not really sure what to switch my major to. All I know is that a criminal justice degree is useless because it limits you to being a cop or going to law school(I don't have that kind of money and don't want to a lawyer). If I switch major I can still be a cop because most departments just want you to have a degree and I can have a back up plan for something else.
Old 01-05-2012, 08:45 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 16,433
Thanks: 18,727
Thanked 22,868 Times in 9,287 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dac View Post
the classes I'm taking are more of basic stuff you can do at home kind of stuff. I would still need to learn way more stuff then I already know to use it as a career.

I'm not really sure what to switch my major to. All I know is that a criminal justice degree is useless because it limits you to being a cop or going to law school(I don't have that kind of money and don't want to a lawyer). If I switch major I can still be a cop because most departments just want you to have a degree and I can have a back up plan for something else.
How about para-legal?
__________________
Old 01-07-2012, 07:32 PM
BugMan BugMan is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ventura County, California
Posts: 91
Thanks: 52
Thanked 91 Times in 46 Posts
Default

Born and raised about as far north in Maine as you can get. Great place to have grown up when I did, but my little home town of 5K residents continues to loose population with now less than half that number. Most younger folk left in search of a better life.

Not impossible, just very difficult to make a good living that far north, even if you're self employed. But land's affordable and water's abundant; and you're young enough to give it a good try :-)
Old 01-07-2012, 08:29 PM
dac dac is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 694
Thanks: 503
Thanked 510 Times in 281 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
How about para-legal?
I'm kinda trying to avoid more "desk rider" jobs if I can. I'm still not sure what I'm gonna end up doing yet. I'll hopefully figure out soon.
Old 01-09-2012, 09:16 PM
wvdoc wvdoc is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: west virginia
Posts: 124
Thanks: 217
Thanked 52 Times in 38 Posts
Default

Look at west Virginia. There are lots of rural areas. Property
is relatively affordable in most areas and property taxes are
pretty good as well. Lots of game to hunt. Weather isnt bad.
Usually long growing seasosns except at the highest elevations.
Most of the state gets alot of precipitation. Probably would want
To come to the west of the allegheny front as the eastern panhandle
is growing rapidly as people move out of he dc area. Pm me if you're
interested
Old 01-10-2012, 01:26 AM
dac dac is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 694
Thanks: 503
Thanked 510 Times in 281 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wvdoc View Post
Look at west Virginia. There are lots of rural areas. Property
is relatively affordable in most areas and property taxes are
pretty good as well. Lots of game to hunt. Weather isnt bad.
Usually long growing seasosns except at the highest elevations.
Most of the state gets alot of precipitation. Probably would want
To come to the west of the allegheny front as the eastern panhandle
is growing rapidly as people move out of he dc area. Pm me if you're
interested
I actually am looking at West Virgina also. from what I've seen it looks nice down there.
Old 01-10-2012, 03:10 PM
Ellen Ellen is offline
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: AZ
Posts: 906
Thanks: 686
Thanked 721 Times in 324 Posts
Default

We have 50 acres in AZ about 8 miles off the highway on a dirt road. We are putting in a well this year but there is no electric. The roads are ok to get by on but bad enough to deter unwanted guests. Just throwing it out there that we are looking for serious people who need an alternative and can't afford to get their own. We KNOW we can't live out there alone. Without neighbors I am not comfortable taking off for a few days at a time without someone to lookout for us.

50 acres needs working; tilling, pulling weeds and cactus for farming, etc. It's a beautiful state and has beautiful views 360 degrees. There is a small hill on the site allowing homes to be built that are not visible from the road. A huge wash borders the property that will make a nice pond once it's dammed off. Growing season is a little short but really not too bad. Needs work, needs people. We are looking!
Old 01-12-2012, 07:48 AM
Akita's Avatar
Akita Akita is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: North America
Posts: 1,411
Thanks: 1,295
Thanked 1,945 Times in 754 Posts
Default

Come to Alaska. It will change your life.
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Should people be able to live in areas like national parks? NAUTHIZ General Discussion 3 04-02-2011 09:42 PM
How Do I Self-Sufficiently Grow Cress & Mustard? NAUTHIZ Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 1 03-28-2011 02:38 PM
Do you live in disaster prone areas? breeze07 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 55 08-25-2010 09:15 AM
for those who live in a coast areas here something i found hank2222 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 13 08-16-2010 12:53 AM
Hurricane Ike Live Video News Links - Watch Live Newsfeed General Discussion 0 09-13-2008 04:40 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net