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View Poll Results: What is your alternate heat source?
Propane Heater 73 27.04%
Kerosene Heater 34 12.59%
Generator to power furnace 31 11.48%
Wood 137 50.74%
Other 75 27.78%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 270. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-03-2012, 12:29 PM
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HandLoad HandLoad is offline
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Have a Beeeg Home - and Live in the NorthBest. So, it is Insulated very well, with Triple Pane Inerted Glass, R-40 + Roof Insulation, and R-21 Walls, Seals on all Doors, Windows, Outlets, and so on.

With just the Heat of Us Two Bodies, and Cooking and Lighting, The Home only needs Supplemental Heating when Ambient Drops and Stays Below Freezing for More than a Couple days. We Like Sleeping Temps to go as low as 55 or so before we begin to get uncomfortable. In the Mornings when we get up and Dress, we Kick Up the heat to 65 or so, just till Breakfast gets started. With all the Insulation and so on, we only add Heating in the Evening, just when we are getting Sedentary - Reading, Sewing, etc.

As for Power-Out Heating Methods, we have Two Wood/Natural Gas Fireplaces, A Catalytic Propane Heater that is Indoors Rated, and Some Radiant Heat Electric heaters with Fans that we can use when On the Generator.. We also have a Number of Candles, and Oil lamps.

YET ANOTHER THANKS FOR THE GRATEWALLOFFIRE!
Old 11-03-2012, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Resto View Post
Here in SW AZ I rarely use Heat. But I doo have a fireplace. Thanks for shareing the Great Wall of Fire, im gonna look into that.
I build my own fireback later which really sends the heat out into the room using Stainless Grade 304 #8 mirror finish and slotted angle iron as feet. Simply slide the steel into the slots you cut into the angle iron for support.

The place I bought the steel from custom cut the steel and formed the edges which I had bent in 1-1/4" in for top and sides. Although not super cheap to do..far superior to most commercial firebacks at a lower cost apples to apples. 0.160 ga plate.
Will NOT warp.

Source for steel is. (I swear I save everything. LOL)

https://www.stainlesssupply.com/orde...t-8-Mirror.htm
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Old 11-03-2012, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by 10 Bears View Post
I worked 30yrs in an unheated building in Ohio and frost was on the walls weeks at a time. You learn to dress for it. It is that simple. Your body will slowly adjust to both heat and cold.

Yes it can be uncomfortable. My suggestion.. make a low tent in your home for multiple people to sleep under using a blanket/sheets or tarp or two. Huddle. Preserve your joint heat.

If you have adequate blankets or a sleeping bag.. Do not sleep in your clothes. Sweat is the enemy.
That's it right there. But people are so spoilt to comfort that anything that makes them uncomfortable becomes a dire hardship. I stopped using climate control about 20 years back specifically as part of breaking myself away from the addiction to comforts. Now I'm comfy sitting on a rock, sleeping on the ground, etc. This had nothing to do with survivalism, actually. It was part of a personal philosophy of rejecting that which I see ruining modern society.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:00 PM
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here we are in november in florida. this week we had record breaking lows. i had to put on long pants until noon.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:09 PM
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I saw a show about reindeer herders in Siberia, who spent bitter cold nights in their tents without a fire. They slept inside a tent within a bigger tent, which provided sufficient insulation apparently.

The old four poster bed with heavy curtains may have been another version of the idea.

Addendum:
The Siberian herders used reindeer pelts for their inner tent. Odd point - they didn't sleep under cover. Their guest was unsure about sleeping in -40 C without a snuggly covering, but they assured him that it was best.

It might be due to frost forming from exhalation. It's better to place the frost line far away from the body - hence the double tent - than to have thick insulation for sleeping.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:23 PM
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Silk long underwear. I have a couple of pair from rei I've had 20 years. Nothing better, except a warm little gal lying next to ya...
Old 11-03-2012, 08:23 PM
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We don't have the option of backup heat as we are renters and our place is all electric. We can layer up on clothes and blankets tho. Ive also added plastic to insulate our craptastic windows. Plus a 45 lb furry footwarmer If it got too cold for that, our mutual assistance friend has extended an invite as they at least have a fireplace.
Old 11-03-2012, 08:27 PM
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It can be a chore to heat an entire house, but not so much to heat one room when there is no power. A kerosene lamp in a single room can keep the chill off (ie; keep from freezing).

We have a wood stove in our basement. If there was a long term disaster and below freezing temps, I'd shut the door to the upstairs and be warm in the basement, 2 walls fully underground. Also, this would help conserve fuel, in this case firewood, so it would last longer, rather than burning more wood to try to heat the entire house.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:51 PM
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We have a several ways to stay warm incase of a power outage. Our main house is heated with a propane hot air furnace but our living room has its own heat supplied by a pellet stove. So in the fall or spring when it is not below freezing ( I don't have to worry about pipes freezing) we use a generator to power the living room lights, pellet stove and entertainment center. This room is wired from its own sub panel which I can quickly disconnect and just start the generator.

If it is more towards winter and freezing pipes are a concern then we would use the generator to run the hot air furnace instead suppling power to the living room.

All of the electrical work was done by an electrician friend so the change overs are easily done and currant cant back feed into the system.

These are only short term solutions. I do not like running things on a generator for to long. So if it something more than a few days we bring a wood stove in from the garage to install in our dining room.

The dining room is very central and has vents to the second floor. We built a "plug" for one of our windows for the metal bestos chimney. We pop out the two sashes in the double hung window, insert the plug, caulk the gap, install the metalbestos, place a piece of slate on the floor and the wood stove on top. Though we don't use the wood stove, except for emergencies, we do keep several cord of wood on hand.
Old 11-03-2012, 08:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DukeOfDeath View Post
We have one of those small heat-powered fans that we sit on top of the stove and the ceiling fan set on its lowest setting(pointing upwards) and the heat is slowly and efficiently pushed throughout the main level.
Same here. I just open the bedroom door awhile before bedtime and it gets some heat but I like a cooler bedroom anyway.

THis is my main heating all winter. I have a propane furnace but it's too expensive to use.

In power outages, I also cook on top of the wood stove. Just bought myself a stainless steel coffee percolator to make coffee on it.
Old 11-03-2012, 10:34 PM
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Well for sure put up some plastic over your windows on the inside (use a hair dryer to heat it/make it stick around the window frame). A fire is nice but the smoke/smell makes it hard to keep a low profile. You could try some candles, which can warm a room up about 10 degrees if it is small enough. Try sleeping under a wool blanket with a dog. That will keep you very warm.
Old 11-03-2012, 10:48 PM
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Saw I already voted.. old thread but always important stuff. At least here in our icy paradise.

Yea, wood for the cabin. Not well insulated, but the small room gets hot really fast, and actually I like it not being so enclosed as it minimizes the risk of CO poisoning if something goes wrong.

If I got stuck here? Wow, whole other business. I'd freeze to a speedsicle. There are no backup systems if both the water born heat and the electric is out. If the electric works, can always cuddle up with my heating fan.

I'd probably cook outdoors in one of our fire pits (I bet I wouldn't be alone), and we'd huddle around the fire for some time. Then, being inside, I guess I would have to barricade myself into the least drafty room (Which one I wonder, since I have three doors to outside and the kitchen doesn't even have a door), build myself a little fortress under a table, cover door and window with layers. Talk about unpleasant... You don't get that much heat out of your own body heat... Wait for spring. Ugh. I feel cold just thinking about it.
Old 11-03-2012, 11:02 PM
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Question: Duke mentioned rotating Kerosene. Does kero have a shelf life? I know gasoline turns to shellac if allowed to sit in a tank long enough.
Old 11-03-2012, 11:08 PM
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I think it's best to have several methods of keeping warm. If the primary goes out, move down the line. My last resort is to group the whole family together in a semi-small room at least at night. I have a large family and if the room is kept super insulated the body heat alone should keep the room around 50 degrees. This is a last ditch resort.
Old 11-04-2012, 01:11 AM
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We have a generator and fuel and also a kerosene heater and fuel. We also have a fireplace but only have 1 face cord wood right now. Have a mountain of warm blankets including couple Down comforters. Will switch from one source of heat to the other if needed depending on which room we are in. Have a gas furnace also. Want to conserve as much of our alternative resources as we can. We turn the furnace to 60 at night and it is toasty in our bedroom with the Down Comforters. We very seldom have a power outage but it could happen.
Old 11-04-2012, 01:17 AM
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How do you keep warm when there's no power?

This clip, 2:20 to 2:40...


Just kidding. I've nothing but love for human peoples.
Old 11-04-2012, 03:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
I saw a show about reindeer herders in Siberia, who spent bitter cold nights in their tents without a fire. They slept inside a tent within a bigger tent, which provided sufficient insulation apparently.

The old four poster bed with heavy curtains may have been another version of the idea.

Addendum:
The Siberian herders used reindeer pelts for their inner tent. Odd point - they didn't sleep under cover. Their guest was unsure about sleeping in -40 C without a snuggly covering, but they assured him that it was best.

It might be due to frost forming from exhalation. It's better to place the frost line far away from the body - hence the double tent - than to have thick insulation for sleeping.
Interior of a Chukchi Yaranga with its reinder skin Polog (inner tent) Chukotskiy Peninsula, Chukotka, Siberia, Russia - - -
http://www.arcticphoto.co.uk/superga.../rc1004-21.htm

The indigenous people's wisdom is self evident.
They use a three layer approach - the outer tent - the inner tent - and one's clothing to create a warm microclimate around the body.

As an alternative to heating up all the air (and furnishings) in an apartment, one might pitch a small tent over their bed, and sleep within it.
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Old 11-04-2012, 04:03 AM
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I freak out and start burning furniture in my kitchen sink,
Old 11-04-2012, 04:39 AM
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I had to use a cold compress for my wrist this week,out of the bottom of a very cold freezer came the pak,it was wraped one side clear thin plastic and on the other it was bubble wrap(Bubbles inside).The temp diff was amazingly noticable,so my best thought would be to use it on the windows.There is a product here called "Air-cell" which is relativly cheap and employs the same tactic.."Bubbles",only biger bubbles,that they use in roof insulation.My bet there is that for the cost it might be a cheaper all-round insulation for the whole house and better obviously if installed while building.
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