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Old 09-28-2011, 03:51 PM
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Default Is it possible to paint over chrome finish on light fixture?



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I have a functional light fixture that I want to use in my bathroom, but it is the wrong color (chrome vs. an oil rubbed bronze color).

Would there be a good way to somehow get paint to stick to the chrome finish so I could reuse the same light fixture?

If so, please walk me through the steps to get started. Thanks!
Old 09-28-2011, 04:28 PM
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I would sand it with some fine grit sand paper (200-300 grit) wipe it off with acetone then prime and paint with some rattle can paint.
I have seen the “decorator” lines of paint that have the fancy finishes in the store, but never used them
Since it is a light fixture it be handled after it is put up so the rattle can paint should hold up well
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Old 09-28-2011, 04:44 PM
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You could prime it with some Bulls Eye 123. Use the brush-on. That stuff will stick to anything. You can use any topcoat, so just pick what you want.
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Old 09-28-2011, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodgepu360 View Post
I would sand it with some fine grit sand paper (200-300 grit) wipe it off with acetone then prime and paint with some rattle can paint.
I have seen the “decorator” lines of paint that have the fancy finishes in the store, but never used them
Since it is a light fixture it be handled after it is put up so the rattle can paint should hold up well

This is good advice.
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Old 09-28-2011, 04:55 PM
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I've used the "decorator" rattle cans on brass and chrome and it turned out great, I went over the fixtures with some steel wool, i think it was the medium one, then rattle can primed and did two coats with the color I wanted
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Old 09-28-2011, 04:59 PM
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I'm mostly with Dodgepu360, but use a coarser grit of sandpaper. Your sanding metal, so ti's not going to scratch very deep.

Make sure you create a criss cross pattern of sanding lines, because the paint will grab that better.

Then use 200 grit to smooth the roughest parts.

clean with acetone

Plain paint will probably work if it won't be handled much, prime then paint if you want a tougher finish.

I painted a chrome pick-up bumper ounce using this technique and some high quality primer and paint. I used "epoxy" primer. Because it is supposed to be stronger than regular. I doubt you need to go that route for a lamp.
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Old 09-28-2011, 05:06 PM
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Thanks to everyone for these terrific ideas!

Would these techniques also work on a metal shower enclosure that has a brass colored finish?
Old 09-28-2011, 05:10 PM
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I'd use an etching primer on a lightly keyed surface for a better grip for the topcoat to grab onto.
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Old 09-28-2011, 05:24 PM
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Thanks to everyone for these terrific ideas!

Would these techniques also work on a metal shower enclosure that has a brass colored finish?
Those colored finishes are usually essentially chrome.

Paint and showers, not usually a good mix.

But if you decide to give it a try, definitely go with the high quality exterior grade primer and paint. And give it several days to dry before using the shower.
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Old 09-28-2011, 06:58 PM
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For the lamp fixture, if it's real chrome and not just a fake chrome finish, Krylon has a color called Oil Rubbed Bronze. It's real dark brown, almost black. I have some and it worked great for me.
For painting things that will be regularly exposed to alot of moisture, you wanna sand it REAL well to get any old paint or finish off completely. It'll come out better if you use a rotary sander or dremel to get a uniform surface. Then put some HEET or rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle and spray it down with it. This removes moisture and any oils or solvents left on it that will allow moisture to inhibit the adhesion of the paints.
Then prime it well with epoxy primer. Epoxy primer will seal the moisture out and create a protective coating. Which will make the paint last longer. Unless you want to have to repaint it again next year?
Make sure to get a primer shade that works well with the color you plan to paint it. If you plan to paint it Oil Rubbed Bronze, get a dark primer color. The reason is that too many layers will result in too much thickness, especially with epoxy primer. If you use a white primer you'll need a couple solid coats of paint to make it your desired shade. With a dark primer a couple light coats will do.
You might even be able to find some "Zynolyte epoxy rust mate" in your desired paint color. That would be your best bet. You don't need primer with that stuff.
This might seem like overkill, or alot of steps for a paint job. But if you choose to simply paint it quickly without sanding well, without the alcohol bath, and/or without epoxy paint or primer, you'll see why I'm suggesting it.
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:07 PM
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I tried it on a shower and it failed miserably, it was a real pain and in the time and materiel it took to do it I should have just bought the fixtures I wanted
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:10 PM
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What steps did you take to prepare your surface before painting?

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I tried it on a shower and it failed miserably, it was a real pain and in the time and materiel it took to do it I should have just bought the fixtures I wanted
Old 09-28-2011, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShaynaGirl View Post
What steps did you take to prepare your surface before painting?
If it's chrome plate then it will be several layers of different plate - copper, nickel and then chrome. If you rub it down to copper an etching primer will latch onto that firmly.
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