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Old 09-15-2011, 01:06 PM
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Default Could this be mulberry?



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I found this very large shrub/tree growing behind the library yesterday.

The leaves are unique and they look like the ones in the field guide for red mulberry. The leaves are toothed, and there are several shapes on the same bush/tree.

The 'catkins' seem rather long.

I'm not familiar with mulberry.

Maybe it's something else altogether?

Arkansas - September

Thanks for any help!
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:10 PM
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I had a mulberry growing in my back yard as a child and it had self planted little trees all along the fence line and none of those looked like what you have there... Im not sure what that is, wish I could be more help there.

Jewel
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Old 09-15-2011, 02:04 PM
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Thanks Lady Jewel. It doesn't look like the mulberry in the videos either.
Well, I was hoping with those distinctive leaves that someone would recognize it right off the bat.
Old 09-15-2011, 02:25 PM
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Looks like a ragweed.
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Old 09-15-2011, 02:32 PM
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Thanks Reality Czech!
It looks just like the pictures of the giant ragweed!
Old 09-15-2011, 02:42 PM
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"Uses: Native Americans rubbed crushed leaves on insect bites and steeped the leaves to make a tea taken for fevers and pneumonia and used as a wash for hives. The root was chewed to alleviate fear at night. Stem fibers were used as thread. Giant ragweed provides wildlife cover."

http://www.kswildflower.org/flower_d...p?flowerID=485

Thanks - now that I know what it is I can include it in my notebook
Old 09-15-2011, 03:18 PM
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http://thecontraryfarmer.wordpress.c...giant-ragweed/

Read this article - it only gets better!
The seeds are high in protein, and more.
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Old 09-16-2011, 02:20 PM
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Greetings All,

The article (blog) referred to above is not terribly accurate. The protein content of giant ragweed seeds [from Spinner and Bishop, The journal of Wildlife Management, April, 1950, Vol. 14, No.2, pp 175-180] is consistent with all such measurements taken later at about 20 percent protein. This is about the same as most of the Eastern Agricultural Complex food seeds. Don't get me wrong, 20 percent is still on a par with a sirloin steak, pound for pound, but of course plant proteins don't have the optimal amino acid composition for us bipeds, but still good. The seed itself is armor plated, and in the indigenous world would have been placed on a metate for grinding into meal.

If you get hayfever in late summer/early fall, proceed with giant ragweed seed as food very cautiously. Most antigens are on the pollen, but this is untested immuno-system territory.

Thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
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Old 09-16-2011, 03:56 PM
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Thanks edibleplantguy for setting the record straight. There is a lot of misinformation on the web.
Would you know if the oil content of the ragweed seeds are as high as they say? They're claiming 19%.
Well, in any case, it's useful and plentiful.
I will try to gather and grind some of the seeds myself as soon as they're ripe. I don't think I'm allergic we'll see!
Thanks again for always helping out!
Old 09-17-2011, 03:29 PM
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Greetings miles2go22,

The source I quoted above, and I believe this is quite consistent with other measurements is actually more like 22 to 24 percent. They are exceedingly oily. Since oils have roughly 2.8 times the calories as sugars and other carbohydrates, gram per gram, this makes them excellent survival food for vast numbers of wildlife species, not to mention us.

Thanks for asking and thanks for reading.

edibleplantguy
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Old 10-25-2011, 11:53 AM
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definitely ragweed, interesting fact i know about it is that if you have allergies to ragweed pollen or any other pollen you can chew the ragweed leaf and its a natural anti histamine. it lasts for an hour or two, just takes like a one to two square inch chunk o leaf.
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Old 10-25-2011, 09:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anarchoprimitivist View Post
definitely ragweed, interesting fact i know about it is that if you have allergies to ragweed pollen or any other pollen you can chew the ragweed leaf and its a natural anti histamine. it lasts for an hour or two, just takes like a one to two square inch chunk o leaf.

really? never heard that before...
Old 10-26-2011, 10:04 AM
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How will eating any part of the plant affect people with seasonal allergies? I don't get anything wrong with my throat—only my nostrils, which begin to spew gunk like a fountain—but it sounds very interesting.
Old 03-27-2012, 04:48 PM
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Isnt mulberry, im not sure wat it is though
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