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Old 08-17-2011, 09:10 AM
William731 William731 is offline
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Default Building with broken concrete chunks????



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I was driving through a shopping mall parking lot the other day and noticed they were tearing up some sections to be replaced. And I noticed the big piles of large (bout 1'-2' x 1'-2') chunks of concrete they had removed, and it got me wondering if it could be reused as a building material. Kinda like an old fashioned stone building? I know it would be a lot of work fitting all those "stones" but if it could be gotten cheap enough the savings would make it worth it, I think (time I got.... Money not so much). So I was wondering if anyone had ever heard of or seen anything like this done before??? Any and all help/advice welcomed and appreciated, thanks .
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Old 08-17-2011, 09:21 AM
nomadjanet nomadjanet is offline
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No but I have seen retaining walls built with them. I have seen people use them to build a wall that they were going to backfill dirt up against. Seems like it would be a good material to use in building an earth bearmed structure.

http://www.the-artistic-garden.com/r...-concrete.html

http://www.concreterepeat.com/News--and--Events.php
Old 08-17-2011, 10:01 AM
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If your stacking them like blocks then you can. But if they are jagged and asymmetrical I wouldn't. The problem is creating shear forces in your joints. Concrete that was poured to take maximum compression force because there is no shear when the material face is perpendicular to the direction of the load.

So as you stack irregular concrete chunks the surface that you apply the mortar is at an angle with respect to the direction of your load. So as load increases the shear force in the mortar increases.

But realistically you probably won't reach the shear limit.

What do you want to build?
Old 08-17-2011, 11:13 AM
William731 William731 is offline
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I was hoping to build a small (40' x 40' x 2 story) house. Small and simple.
Old 08-17-2011, 12:03 PM
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The other thing to consider is how big your footings will have to be to support all that unnecessary concrete for your structure.

How will you reinforce it? Drilling holes for rebar will be very time consuming.

Plus if you go to get a permit they may not approve the structure unless an engineer stamps your drawings. Or if you don't get one and they find out what you did, there will be fines.

you're thinking outside the box sure, but realistically the labor and effort youll need to pull it off isn't worth the cost of your own materials. Pouring your own foundation and walls would be easier.
Old 08-17-2011, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
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I was hoping to build a small (40' x 40' x 2 story) house. Small and simple.
40x40x2story is not a small and simple house. That is 3200 sq ft.
Old 08-17-2011, 01:36 PM
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they are great for retaining walls, Southernprepper1 did a video of a place where they used similar material to secure around a security gate put them up for fighting posisions as well as barriers.

That is a pretty big house and would take a LOT of material to build, but another thing that could be concidered would be raised garden beds out of this material, if placed right, it would make great defensive posisions around the yard
Old 08-17-2011, 02:43 PM
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lots of old houses made from stone and rocks , so the concrete chunks would make a good wall ! houses will be built with walls , just get a good mortar to put in between them and keep each piece level ! you can build a round house if you would like or any other style that suites your taste !
Old 08-17-2011, 08:30 PM
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Watch yourself. That could be considered theft. Around here they crush all the bug chunks they got from the slabs of ruined houses and sell the gravel.
Old 08-17-2011, 08:38 PM
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I wouldn't recommend it, if it's what I think it is odds are it's heavier ten he'll an drilling holes for rebar will only brake it to pieces. What makes concrete so strong is the rebar in the middle. It supports the weight and adds to the structure. You'd be better off buying some lumber and doing a house that way. Because realistically when u take into account the price of gas used to carry the amount of stone (assuming u have a regular pickup nothing fancy) then your going to be spending 5x the cash u would no doubt
Old 08-17-2011, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William731 View Post
I was hoping to build a small (40' x 40' x 2 story) house. Small and simple.
Working construction for 5 years now for an old school builder who doesn't like wasting lumber. The best width for a simple home is 28 foot, it works the block, decking, rafters will only have small scraps (kindling). from there the length can whatever you want, but keeping it in a length that is evenly divided into 4 foot lengths will work the material with less waste.
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Old 08-18-2011, 07:31 AM
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How is it any different that building with stone, which is built without rebar? The chunks would still have the rebar inside them. rebar gives concrete it's "tensile" strength, the makeup of the concrete mix is what gives it the "compresive" strength. I wasn't going to just load it up without asking, I was defiantly going to ask first. Just my thoughts at the moment.
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Old 08-18-2011, 08:07 AM
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Google "slip forming".
I would not build a huge house that way, but I've only read about it, never applied it.
Old 08-18-2011, 09:08 AM
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I've heard of that used as 'in fill' rubble before....two parallel walls side by side, with the rubble mixed with concrete between them as re-enforcement. Similar things were done in Europe, for castle walls, and I'd really love to do that as a wall around my property, but I'm not sure about a house.
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Old 08-19-2011, 01:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William731 View Post
How is it any different that building with stone, which is built without rebar? The chunks would still have the rebar inside them. rebar gives concrete it's "tensile" strength, the makeup of the concrete mix is what gives it the "compresive" strength. I wasn't going to just load it up without asking, I was defiantly going to ask first. Just my thoughts at the moment.

it is not much different than building with stone ! most of the concrete that you would get would come from side walks old parking lots and the tinsel strength would be greater than 3000 psi witch is common for home owners !

if you build the walls say 2' thick just think of the insulating factor that you would have !
Old 08-19-2011, 04:43 PM
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if you build the walls say 2' thick just think of the insulating factor that you would have ![/QUOTE]

i had a stone house with 2 1/2 foot thick walls, no insulation at all. it was miserable. hard to cool, impossible to heat. when i bought it i thought it would be a frugal home....i couldnt have been more wrong. it was built like a fort and had lots of charm but i wouldnt ever do it again. maybe i was just unlucky....

also: i have heard broken or recycled concrete be refered to as " urbanite" in the green building movement
Old 08-19-2011, 08:28 PM
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They're using 'urbanite' in the base foundation of cob houses out there in the alternative section - where otherwise they would use a dry stone wall foundation. Apparently the dry stone wall factor stops seepage of moisture but I wouldn't guarantee it. And these cob structures are small. And it's only the intensely green ones who aren't just getting a poured concrete floor, who are making dirt floors and making those footings and foundations out of stacked up rubble.

I see no value in making a rubble house in that by the time you're done making allowances for all this rubble you could have built and insulated a square wooden box three times over. If you are using the stone for walls how do you get your insulation in? You'd only want a concrete house in the tropics because it has such a cooling effect. I lived in a poured concrete house when I was younger, 8 inch outer walls, 6 inch internal walls and it was cold. cold cold cold.

It has great thermal mass but no insulative powers. You need a fire in every room - and it needs to be a reasonable fire.
Old 08-19-2011, 10:54 PM
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My dad recycled broken up concrete by making pathways to and from the garden. It worked out well. Now that the grass is growing between each chunk, it looks really good.
Old 08-19-2011, 11:13 PM
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i guess the insulating factor would be different were you lived !
Old 08-20-2011, 12:17 PM
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The R factor is constant. Has nothing to do where you live. Your wall isn't only as efficient as the materials used to build it. Concrete is not a good insulator.
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